Africa Twin vs Super Tenere - Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin Forum
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-05-2016, 03:07 PM Thread Starter
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Africa Twin vs Super Tenere

Found a French video with the Africa Twin and Super Tenere Dyno charts. Maybe someone who speaks french can give us a general rundown of what he's saying but for now you can still take a look at the chart.

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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-05-2016, 07:32 PM
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Don`t know what he`s saying but most importantly we can see the charts and seeing great off the line power and a good stream of power throughout the power band is all I need to see

Thanks for finding and posting this.
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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-05-2016, 09:00 PM
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Hard to read those charts, but looks well down on performance compared to the Super Tenere if I do read them right. Slightly disappointing... I knew the AT was slower than most big adventure bikes, but at least expected it to be closer to the Super Tenere, which is a bike many criticise as being under-powered.

Oh well, I guess I'm not buying it for outright performance...
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-05-2016, 09:55 PM
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Originally Posted by anotherbiker View Post
Hard to read those charts, but looks well down on performance compared to the Super Tenere if I do read them right. Slightly disappointing... I knew the AT was slower than most big adventure bikes, but at least expected it to be closer to the Super Tenere, which is a bike many criticise as being under-powered.

Oh well, I guess I'm not buying it for outright performance...
Considering the Super Tenere weighs 80 pounds (584# wet) more than an Africa Twin and puts out 90 RWHP (rear wheel horsepower) you're looking at 1 HP per 6.5 pounds of weight. At 504 pounds wet and (est) 80 RWHP, the Africa Twin comes in at 6.3 pounds per HP. The AT is down on horsepower, but should be pretty evenly matched in performance. Except in really rugged off road settings where the weight advantage of the AT will let it out perform the S-10 easily.

(Calculated AT RWHP by allowing 15% drive train loss - so 0.85 x 94 hp at flywheel is 80 at rear wheel. Should be close enough.)
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-06-2016, 01:44 AM
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The article with the video

Le tout nouveau bicylindre parallèle de 998 cm3 de la Honda Africa Twin, ne dépasse pas 100 chevaux sur le papier. Les ingénieurs Honda l'ont voulu ainsi, ils ont misé sur l'agrément, la réactivité du moteur et la concordance technique avec la transmission à double embrayage DCT optionnelle. Nous avons pu passer au banc de puissance une version standard, à boîte de vitesses classique.

Signalons que notre moto d'emprunt affichait moins de 300 kilomètres au compteur. Néanmoins, la Honda Africa Twin 2016 a tout de même atteint 103,3 chevaux à 7 809 tr/min et 10,8 mkg de couple à 5 858 tr/min (valeurs relevées au vilebrequin). A comparer aux données constructeur : 95 chevaux à 7 500 tr/min et 98 Nm à 6 000 tr/min. Les mesures relevées au banc de puissance sont donc assez fidèles aux données officielles. Par ailleurs, l'allure des courbes correspond également de près à celles évoquées par Honda. Nous retenons la grande linéarité des courbes (puissance et couple), signe d'un remplissage optimisé, sans creux ou trous à l'accélération.

Les reprises sont d'ailleurs très convaincantes et le bloc Honda se distingue par sa grande réactivité à l'ouverture des gaz : Il est vif et reprend partout sans être mièvre. Peu avant 4 500 tr/min, un léger - très léger - creux se remarque sur la courbe. Il correspond pile à la plage de régime d'homologation et Honda a du le prendre en compte lors du développement du moteur car ce léger plat est aussi discret sur les courbes que guidon en mains. Signalons enfin que l'allonge de ce moteur s'avère quelque peu atténuée à haut régime (après 7 500 tr/min). Compte tenu de l'allure générale des courbes et de la santé de ce moteur à mi régimes, Honda pourrait sans doute garnir davantage ce bloc au niveau de l'allonge. Ce sera sans doute le cas pour un futur modèle qui héritera de ce moteur. Une moto plus sportive ? ou une super Deauville 1000 cm3 ? pourquoi pas...

google translation

The all-new parallel twin 998 cm3 Honda Africa Twin, does not exceed 100 horsepower on paper. Honda engineers wanted it so, they relied on the approval, engine responsiveness and technical consistency with the DCT transmission optional double clutch. We were able to move Rig standard version, conventional gearbox.

Note that our borrowing motorcycle showed less than 300 km on the odometer. Nevertheless, the Honda Africa Twin 2016 still reached 103.3 horsepower at 7809 rev / min and torque of 10.8 kgm at 5858 r / min (values ​​measured at the crankshaft). To compare with manufacturer's data: 95 horsepower at 7500 rev / min and 98 Nm at 6000 r / min. The measures identified Rig are fairly faithful to the official data. Moreover, the curves also correspond closely to those mentioned by Honda. We retain the linearity curves (power and torque), a sign of an optimized filling, without hollows or holes in acceleration.

Repeats are also very convincing and Honda block is distinguished by its high reactivity in the throttle opening: It is quick and takes anywhere without being cutesy. Shortly before 4500 rev / min, a slight - very slight - troughs remark on the curve. It corresponds to the stack approval rev range and Honda had to take it into account during engine development because this lightweight dish is as discreet as the curves handlebar hands. Note finally that the extension of this motor turns somewhat attenuated at high speed (after 7500 rev / min). Given the general shape of the curves and the health of this midrange engine, Honda could probably fill more this block at the draw. This is probably the case for a future model that will inherit this engine. A sportier bike? or super Deauville 1000 cm3? why not...
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-06-2016, 07:57 AM
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Dyno charts are generally optimistic so if they read over the claimed 95HP take it with a pinch of salt. The curve is the important part.

I will certainly add an after market exhaust to my AT once I've done a few hundred KM's. This should further reduce the weight and give better throttle response if I can remove the cat.

@erey - is the exhaust a two or three piece system on the AT ? ...sometimes the catalytic converter is a separate piece. I can't really see from pictures as it looks like there is a heat guard in the way.
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-06-2016, 09:00 AM
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I looked up BMW R1200GS and KTM 1190 Charts too to compare. Well, that was interesting...

CRF1000L, wow
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-06-2016, 11:21 AM
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Fair point Bill on including the weight in the calculation. Though, in that case the Triumph Tiger 800 could be interesting comparison, as it's significantly lighter than the DCT Africa Twin, and I believe produces similar peak HP. Though, it revs a lot higher too, so hopefully the AT would be stronger in the mid-range.

I've never added an aftermarket exhaust and done a remap on a bike before, but I'm considering it with the AT as I can't help but feel there's more potential to be had out of a 1000cc engine. But I'm a bit nervous about it. For those who have done this sort of thing before, does it affect reliability or longevity of the engine? Does it tend to significantly reduce fuel economy?
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-06-2016, 11:46 AM
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Originally Posted by anotherbiker View Post
Fair point Bill on including the weight in the calculation. Though, in that case the Triumph Tiger 800 could be interesting comparison, as it's significantly lighter than the DCT Africa Twin, and I believe produces similar peak HP. Though, it revs a lot higher too, so hopefully the AT would be stronger in the mid-range.

I've never added an aftermarket exhaust and done a remap on a bike before, but I'm considering it with the AT as I can't help but feel there's more potential to be had out of a 1000cc engine. But I'm a bit nervous about it. For those who have done this sort of thing before, does it affect reliability or longevity of the engine? Does it tend to significantly reduce fuel economy?
In terms of fuel economy it depends on what you're actually getting done. But for the most part performance costs something and it's usually gasoline.
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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-06-2016, 12:57 PM
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The full comparaison

http://www.moto-station.com/article1...-legendes.html

The exaust is in 2 parts. The catalyc converter is not a separate piece.
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