DIY tubeless conversion - Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin Forum
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-20-2019, 02:48 AM Thread Starter
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DIY tubeless conversion

I’ve been toying with the idea of tubeless tires on the AT since buying it a year ago. I mainly use it to commute so if I get a flat I want to be able to fix it quickly and get moving again. I had a tubliss system on my KTM and hated it - it leaked constantly - so I didn’t want to go that way. My buddy had sent me details of a Japanese kit that used tape to seal the nipples. When I looked into this kit it seemed simple enough - so much so that I figured I could probably do it myself and save a fair chunk of money And I was right. The kit consisted of 2 main components - a gooey thick sealing tape and a couple of tubeless valve stems. The latter are used on most car tires so that was easy. I found the tape on Amazon and bought 2 inch wide for a mere $15. (I’ll post a link later). After the tires and tubes were removed I carefully cleaned the inner rim, removing all marks and grease. I then slowly applied the tape using a lot of pressure, trying to avoid air bubbles or creases. This stuff is super sticky so take your time and get it smooth. I cut off the surplus edging from the front rim and cleared a hole in the tape where the valve stem would go. (In hindsight I should have bought 1 inch and 2 inch tape). I had to drill the hole a little larger to accept the tubeless valve stem.
Just for security I replaced the original rubber liner over the tape. The new tubeless tires we fitted - ContiTrailAttack 2s - and the beads seared nicely. I inflated to 55 psi and left them overnight. In the morning neither tire had lost an ounce of pressure. 🙂
I set them to the correct pressure and a week later they are all good. Result.
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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-20-2019, 03:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcoma View Post
I’ve been toying with the idea of tubeless tires on the AT since buying it a year ago. I mainly use it to commute so if I get a flat I want to be able to fix it quickly and get moving again. I had a tubliss system on my KTM and hated it - it leaked constantly - so I didn’t want to go that way. My buddy had sent me details of a Japanese kit that used tape to seal the nipples. When I looked into this kit it seemed simple enough - so much so that I figured I could probably do it myself and save a fair chunk of money And I was right. The kit consisted of 2 main components - a gooey thick sealing tape and a couple of tubeless valve stems. The latter are used on most car tires so that was easy. I found the tape on Amazon and bought 2 inch wide for a mere $15. (I’ll post a link later). After the tires and tubes were removed I carefully cleaned the inner rim, removing all marks and grease. I then slowly applied the tape using a lot of pressure, trying to avoid air bubbles or creases. This stuff is super sticky so take your time and get it smooth. I cut off the surplus edging from the front rim and cleared a hole in the tape where the valve stem would go. (In hindsight I should have bought 1 inch and 2 inch tape). I had to drill the hole a little larger to accept the tubeless valve stem.
Just for security I replaced the original rubber liner over the tape. The new tubeless tires we fitted - ContiTrailAttack 2s - and the beads seared nicely. I inflated to 55 psi and left them overnight. In the morning neither tire had lost an ounce of pressure. 🙂
I set them to the correct pressure and a week later they are all good. Result.
Please let us know how you get on with this, what was the tape called so we can look it up on Amazon??
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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-20-2019, 04:16 AM
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Butyl tape is what i would use if i ever do this to mine


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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-20-2019, 04:49 AM
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Originally Posted by olmoggy1 View Post
Butyl tape is what i would use if i ever do this to mine


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I will probably just send my original rims off to have them bartublessed
seems the sensible cost effective way, and I think you get some sort of warranty..
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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-20-2019, 05:29 AM
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Not wishing to upset anyone, IMHO using tape to seal the spokes seems substandard engineering to me. Great for an emergency but I would not do this to my new AT as a permanent solution!
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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-20-2019, 08:35 AM
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I did this over the winter with mixed results, using 3M 5200FC sealer around the spokes and 3M 4412N tape over that. On the rear it worked fine, and is still working with a thousand miles on it. The front failed after just a hundred miles or so; the tape lifted and the sealer around the spokes just peeled off. I had put the spoke band back in the front but not in the rear, but I can't say if that was the difference; it might have been poor cleaning. I cleaned it all up and put the tube back in the front.
Since the reason I wanted to change to tubeless was because I found I could not break the rear tire down with tools I would be carrying with me, it was a win, sort of. I can get the front tire off to fix the tube and I can plug the rear, if I need to.
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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-20-2019, 12:17 PM Thread Starter
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Here's the tape I used:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007Y7CLHM

I did a lot of research before doing this and as I use the bike to commute, I put about 100 miles a day on it. I'm in CA so its pretty hot and I was wondering how the extreme heat of summer will affect it - but I guess we'll find out in the long term. If it fails, I'll post up here.
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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-20-2019, 11:08 PM
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I use an Outext kit in February and have only added a couple of pounds, literally, to each wheel since that time. The 3M tape wold have been cheaper, but I cannot complain with the results.

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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-21-2019, 09:54 PM
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I used the 2inch 3M 4412N tape to seal my rear rim last July (>10000 km ago), worked great no issues. I check my tire pressure regularly and the most it has ever been down is 2 PSI (and only a couple of times). Did the front tire last August with 1.5 inch 3M 4411N tape, if I was to do it again I would have used the 1inch tape on the front to avoid trimming hassle. Initially the front lost a bit of air (2 or 3 PSI over a two week period, a couple of time) but then seemed to stabilize. I have about 3500km on the front. Since topping the tires up this spring I have added air once to each tire at different times after checking pressure, only a couple of PSI.
Haven't changed a tire since doing it. I will be changing the rear in a couple weeks, I am going on a trip into southern BC next week and the rear tire will be done by the time I return. I guess I will see how the tape has held up and if endures the tire swap.

I ordered valve stems that fit the existing holes so no drilling required (8.3mm).

Clean rim well and apply lots of pressure to remove bubbles when mounting tape. Unless you anchor the rim strip with the valve stem dont put it back in as it will rotate and block valve stem (dont ask me how I know)
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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 07-27-2019, 11:14 AM
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If you want a troublefree and permanent solution replace your wheels. Kineo are the very best.
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