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FWIW, I’ve used the stock charger to keep my iPhone charged while using navigation and had no problem. Works just fine, and I doubt a GPS would draw more power or cause a problem. Granted, I wasn’t riding at night so no need for high beams.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Willy,
I'm gonna have to concur with DoubleThumper on this. This is what's in the '18 owners manual:

Accessory Socket CRF1000A II/D II The accessory socket is located in the left side inner panel cover. Use accessory devices at your own risk. In no event shall Honda be liable for any damages to your accessory device when in use. Open the cover to access the socket. Rated capacity is 24 W (12 V, 2 A).

And, kind-a like I stated earlier, ALL of my lighting is LED so, at least on the lighting side of things, the electrical draw, even at idle, is minimal. Your statement of:

"If this is true, just don't idle the bike with everything electrical running for many, many minutes."

I'm wondering about that. Now, don't shoot the messenger here, I'm still learning quite a bit about the AT. I would think that, in this time frame of manufacturing motorcycles, especially Honda, they would engineer an electrical system, and again, especially the AT, to be capable of handling ANY set of electrical demand circumstances in operation. The AT, any version, is purchased and sent all over the world and, is presumably expected to operate in night time operations as well as daytime. The specs Honda puts in the Service manual are not all that definitive, like they are in other manufacturers manuals. At least not in the way I would understand them.

But, when I say the electrical system should handle any given set of operational circumstances, i.e. hi beam, low beam, flashers, idling, etc. I'm suggesting a BONE STOCK AT. Not one that has multiple aftermarket electrical devises, i.e. GPS, auxiliary lights (multiple sets), phone charging, GPS charging, and whatever else is or can be installed on an AT that demands some sort of electrical current. Those of you that have installed many of the aftermarket items I mentioned, have not stated that you've experienced any low voltage supply problems, at any rpm range, at least not that I've red anyways.
Scott
 

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I know my voltmeter says 13.2 and hags there most of the time no matter what I have on. But I have yet to see what I would do maxed out with all my lights and electronics on @ idle speed for the most part I’m moving when using that stuff. I‘m guessing it is just precautionary; in general people see a 12v outlet and try to run everything off it, inverters, laptops, their campsite. I could easily see someone setting up camp with the high beams on and a flood light plugged into the socket..
 

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Hey Scott:

Yeah, I didn't want to assume the output of the charging circuit was proportional with engine RPM. I have no idea.

But yes, if one assumes (wrongfully or not) a linear-ish relationship, then I speculate 21.5 A @ 3000 RPM, or more or less what you estimated.

I guess Honda knows this is an issue on that circuit, otherwise they would have not posted a recommendation (or warning?). All I know is Honda recommends limiting the accessory socket to a 2 A load. Maybe this is higher on the ATAS models (7.5 A?).
The owners manual for my 2019 ATAS shows 2A and the power point on the dash is also marked 2A
 

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My 2005 rancher es has the same low output warning for the accessory outlet. Like OP, I originally thought what is this tom foolery?

Turned out to be a moot point. It has no issue handling my big sprayer motor while puttering around spraying the pasture. It also powersy 12 volt air compressor fine and runs the 3000 lb winch.

All are rated 3 to 4 times the amperage that the manual says not to exceed. I've yet to blow a fuse.
 

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My 2005 rancher es has the same low output warning for the accessory outlet. Like OP, I originally thought what is this tom foolery?

Turned out to be a moot point. It has no issue handling my big sprayer motor while puttering around spraying the pasture. It also powersy 12 volt air compressor fine and runs the 3000 lb winch.

All are rated 3 to 4 times the amperage that the manual says not to exceed. I've yet to blow a fuse.
Specs are usually related to wire size and thus current capacity.
250Watts approximately 25 Amps @ typical 10V is about all you are going to get on old vehicles - depending on the fuse or course.
Newer vehicles and motorcycles use less copper and smaller wire sizes - hence the 2-4 Amp max on power outlets. Anything more than that and wire insulation begins to soften, melt and the wires short out.

Know your amps, volts, watts and wire size current capability before assuming it should work.
 

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Willy,
I'm gonna have to concur with DoubleThumper on this. This is what's in the '18 owners manual:

Accessory Socket CRF1000A II/D II The accessory socket is located in the left side inner panel cover. Use accessory devices at your own risk. In no event shall Honda be liable for any damages to your accessory device when in use. Open the cover to access the socket. Rated capacity is 24 W (12 V, 2 A).

And, kind-a like I stated earlier, ALL of my lighting is LED so, at least on the lighting side of things, the electrical draw, even at idle, is minimal. Your statement of:

"If this is true, just don't idle the bike with everything electrical running for many, many minutes."

I'm wondering about that. Now, don't shoot the messenger here, I'm still learning quite a bit about the AT. I would think that, in this time frame of manufacturing motorcycles, especially Honda, they would engineer an electrical system, and again, especially the AT, to be capable of handling ANY set of electrical demand circumstances in operation. The AT, any version, is purchased and sent all over the world and, is presumably expected to operate in night time operations as well as daytime. The specs Honda puts in the Service manual are not all that definitive, like they are in other manufacturers manuals. At least not in the way I would understand them.

But, when I say the electrical system should handle any given set of operational circumstances, i.e. hi beam, low beam, flashers, idling, etc. I'm suggesting a BONE STOCK AT. Not one that has multiple aftermarket electrical devises, i.e. GPS, auxiliary lights (multiple sets), phone charging, GPS charging, and whatever else is or can be installed on an AT that demands some sort of electrical current. Those of you that have installed many of the aftermarket items I mentioned, have not stated that you've experienced any low voltage supply problems, at any rpm range, at least not that I've red anyways.
Scott
Lenny from RevZilla agrees with you :)
Also talks about "excess capacity" which is the meat of this discussion.
How to add heated gear to your motorcycle
 

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Before my Adventure Sport, I had, still have an R1100GS, a bike designed in the early 1990s. It came as standard with a power socket. Rated at 15A and connected directly to the battery, always live it could be used to power items or as a charging point for the optimate. So useful in almost every way imaginable. When I got the Honda... I was rather more than just disappointed with the power socket. I wondered what's it for? What use is it to me? No use at all as it turns out.. Though that might change when I finally catch up with the times and buy a smart phone. My GPS is connected to the aux. connection behind the front plastics. Anyway... I am going to copy my antique BMW and add an always live socket. Using the alleged toolbox that covers the battery to hold it with the fuse in the box itself.
 

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For clarity to Forum folks:

The optional accessory 12V socket is limited to 2A at 12V. This is according to Honda. Further, the year 2018+ optional accessory 12V has no built-in fuse (maybe the fuse is elsewhere?). The pre-2018 year version of the accessory did and the accessory wiring harness was different.
Yeah, the kit I put on my 2016 came with a little 2A sticker I applied to the fairing next to the socket. It also has a 7.5A fuse in the harness. Not sure which part of the wiring system restricts the socket to 24W. That makes me wonder if some other part of the circuit has some issue with higher current flow. And if it really is to be limited to 24W, why not put a 3A fuse in the circuit? So many questions.
 

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Yeah, the kit I put on my 2016 came with a little 2A sticker I applied to the fairing next to the socket. It also has a 7.5A fuse in the harness. Not sure which part of the wiring system restricts the socket to 24W. That makes me wonder if some other part of the circuit has some issue with higher current flow. And if it really is to be limited to 24W, why not put a 3A fuse in the circuit? So many questions.
Agreed. I could see your said numbers getting through one model year, but multiple model years? That would almost imply a design limitation of some sort. It could also mean some really lazy business on Honda's part, or they are cutting back on effort.
 

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Lenny from RevZilla agrees with you :)
Also talks about "excess capacity" which is the meat of this discussion.
How to add heated gear to your motorcycle
The DC electrical system on the bike can be thought of as a pressurized water system with valves, pipes & hoses. The pressure (voltage) is provided by a pump somewhere like the alternator or the magneto AND the battery if there is one. The fluid in the system is the electrons which move down the pipes (conducting wires, measured in amps) and the power available at any place in the system is simply the pressure times the available flow rate (volts x amps = watts). The battery is a special kind of power provider. If the external system pressure (voltage) at the terminals is greater than the native pressure in the battery then electrons will flow into the battery, charging it. If the system pressure is below the battery pressure it will provide electrons to the system, tapping its internal reserve of electrons.

The water analogy holds pretty well across the DC use spectrum. Open a lot of spigots (turn on a lot of items), and the power available at each opening will decrease (usually a current limit) unless you have a pump that can keep up with the flow desired. If you exceed the power capacity of the pump (like low RPM, say) the system pressure will drop (voltage) and the battery will begin to add some power into the system while it can. Know that there is a pressure (voltage) regulator on the main pump so it won't blow (fry) downstream components.

The size of the pump (alternator/magneto/stator) is a complex relation of magnetic field strength, core wire gauge & armature/winding count, # of phases, and most importantly, rotor RPM. Just like any rotating pump, the higher the speed, the higher the power potential. The AT has a pretty decent power generation capability - almost 500W at 5,000 rpm. That's 41A with change at 12V. It could power a decent desktop gaming computer. If your bike is pushing around 2/3 or more of this "load" (28A) low RPM can likely end up drawing current from your battery even while the motor is turning. Starting could be a problem too unless you shut some of this load down.

It can be a good idea to put a short spreadsheet together to keep track of the load you've added to the machine. Add the amps up and try to stay under the 28A for starting. Use low power components if you can: LED lights vs. incandescent for example. Rowe Electronics makes a nifty power manager that can delay some load when the ignition is turned on so starting is not impacted.


Several folks on the forum have mounted a PDM60 on their Twin.
 
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I just checked and the smaller fuse box 2 under the seat has the option circuit for the 12V socket. The biggest draw to share this 10 amps would be heated grips. Thankfully Honda eliminated the in-line 2A fuse on the 12V socket on the 2018. A GPS should not draw more than 1A.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Olias,
I thank you for that information. This what's great about this forum. Lots of helpful folks.
Scott
 

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I just checked and the smaller fuse box 2 under the seat has the option circuit for the 12V socket. The biggest draw to share this 10 amps would be heated grips. Thankfully Honda eliminated the in-line 2A fuse on the 12V socket on the 2018. A GPS should not draw more than 1A.
What year bike Olias?
 
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