Honda Africa Twin Forum banner

Has your 2018-2020+ Africa Twin Adventure Sports experienced fueling/idling/stalling/loss of power?

  • Yes. I have had the dealership/Honda resolve the issue(s) under warranty at no cost.

  • Yes. The dealership resolved it for me, but my warranty was expired and I had to pay out of pocket

  • Yes. I have had these issues, but resolved the problem on my own and Honda is not aware.

  • No. I have not had these issues, but I took precautionary measured (Guglatech Filter, etc.)

  • No. But I am concerned that I will have this issue down the road.

  • I have contacted Honda about my concerns

  • I have filed a Safety Defect Report with NHTSA or other regulatory agency per Owners Manual


Results are only viewable after voting.
661 - 680 of 698 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I’ve been watching this thread since I got my ATAS ES DCT June 13. I have put 5k miles on it since then, including a 4,300 mile loop from Olympia, WA to Denver, CO. and back. 10 days of riding with one 710 mile day. Several days were high desert with temps near 100F. Negotiated several high speed passes when I needed to hit 90mph. I haven’t had a single negative incident with the bike. I kept up with this thread so I could handle the problem if/when it occurred but so far, nothing. Seems it’s inevitable from what I’ve read here but...
I was in the same situation, my bike seemed to run fine, but I decided to look in the tank to make sure there was no issue. Unfortunately, I was able to confirm I had the issue. The fuel strainer was was very clogged with flakes everywhere. Looking inside the tank is preventative maintenance at this point, in my opinion. Waiting until you have a problem could cause you to have an even bigger problem. Being stranded or having to limp home is not something you want to deal with even on short trips. It doesn't take much effort to look inside the tank and at least you will know for sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I’ve been watching this thread since I got my ATAS ES DCT June 13. I have put 5k miles on it since then, including a 4,300 mile loop from Olympia, WA to Denver, CO. and back. 10 days of riding with one 710 mile day. Several days were high desert with temps near 100F. Negotiated several high speed passes when I needed to hit 90mph. I haven’t had a single negative incident with the bike. I kept up with this thread so I could handle the problem if/when it occurred but so far, nothing. Seems it’s inevitable from what I’ve read here but...
Hi there dallas!

Have you looked in the tank? I'd suggest a $30-$50 endoscope off of Amazon. Or you can take the tank off and pull the fuel pump to see what it looks like. Personally, I'd do the scope to determine if it's worth removing the tank to clean. Simply put, the pictures don't lie and if it's in there, it's going to happen eventually. I honestly expect that all of the AS tanks have this issue and it's just a matter of if/when you expose them to the right conditions for long enough for it to start letting go and cause problems.

Either way, I wouldn't be comfortable just crossing my fingers and hoping there's nothing in there. Especially on those high-speed 90mph passes :) I had similar passes, one was getting in front of a semi-truck before the passing lane ended, cars approaching from the opposite direction JUST 20 miles before I encountered the fuel issue for the very first time. I've wondered a few times what would've happened had it cut out just then. I ride pretty conservatively, but even the conservative need to pass now and then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Hi there dallas!

Have you looked in the tank? I'd suggest a $30-$50 endoscope off of Amazon. Or you can take the tank off and pull the fuel pump to see what it looks like. Personally, I'd do the scope to determine if it's worth removing the tank to clean. Simply put, the pictures don't lie and if it's in there, it's going to happen eventually. I honestly expect that all of the AS tanks have this issue and it's just a matter of if/when you expose them to the right conditions for long enough for it to start letting go and cause problems.

Either way, I wouldn't be comfortable just crossing my fingers and hoping there's nothing in there. Especially on those high-speed 90mph passes :) I had similar passes, one was getting in front of a semi-truck before the passing lane ended, cars approaching from the opposite direction JUST 20 miles before I encountered the fuel issue for the very first time. I've wondered a few times what would've happened had it cut out just then. I ride pretty conservatively, but even the conservative need to pass now and then.
Thanks for the tip on the scope. I hadn’t seen it specified here and I kept forgetting to ask if anyone here knows of one. I ride pretty conservatively also but that occasional pass you described...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,946 Posts
Thanks for the tip on the scope. I hadn’t seen it specified here and I kept forgetting to ask if anyone here knows of one. I ride pretty conservatively also but that occasional pass you described...
Note on using a scope:
The bottom side lip on the filler neck is like a serrated steak knife so take precautions with the shaft of the scope, especially if it is plastic coated..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Sounds like a solid plan. Reach out if you run into any questions. It wasn't as daunting as it first seemed to me once I figured out the order of operations.
I have experience cleaning Honda Gold Wing GL1200 tanks, although has been 30 years. My goodness, 1990 was that long ago. Lol. I’m not intimidated by the task, and with that said, this thread has given me better ideas than how I carried out the task the last time. I’m better equipped today than I was then. I have a garage, air compressor, tools, electric lighting, etc. The last time I undertook cleaning crap out of two in a driveway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
I’ve been watching this thread since I got my ATAS ES DCT June 13. I have put 5k miles on it since then, including a 4,300 mile loop from Olympia, WA to Denver, CO. and back. 10 days of riding with one 710 mile day. Several days were high desert with temps near 100F. Negotiated several high speed passes when I needed to hit 90mph. I haven’t had a single negative incident with the bike. I kept up with this thread so I could handle the problem if/when it occurred but so far, nothing. Seems it’s inevitable from what I’ve read here but...
Dallas, you might be able to imagine how glad I am to here of your successful trip! I’m wondering if fuel mixtures have an impact on how fast or how severe the flaking occurs. Different areas in the US use different seasonal mixes. I have 425 miles on my 2020 AT AS ES DCT. That isn’t 10 gallons of Tennessee mixed unleaded 87 Octane fuel. First tank went in at the dealer in Chattanooga and the second by me here in Cookeville, TN. I used the lizard cam on my tank two days ago and I can see the flaking along the welds. I couldn’t locate the filter with my scope, I didn’t spend a lot of time looking either. I’m still pulling the tank to do a thorough inspection and install the two Guglatech fuel pre-filters.
On the positive note: I hope you never have this issue, period. And I hope I never have to turn my ATAS in for warranty work on the fuel pump.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Thanks for the tip on the scope. I hadn’t seen it specified here and I kept forgetting to ask if anyone here knows of one. I ride pretty conservatively also but that occasional pass you described...
You bet. Here's the one I picked up from Amazon, it works pretty well (see most internal tank pics I've posted here). It does get a little finicky and drops the connection with my phone too often, but that may be my phone. If you're using a VPN on your phone (i.e. ExpressVPN), you'll need to turn that off to use the scope or you'll be pulling your hair out trying to figure out why it won't connect. Ask me how I know lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Note on using a scope:
The bottom side lip on the filler neck is like a serrated steak knife so take precautions with the shaft of the scope, especially if it is plastic coated..
Oh yeah, I'll second that. In fact, I cut a piece of landscape irrigation tubing (the black type used for drip systems and such) and then fed the scope through that to prevent the scraping on the endoscope cable. It'd take a bit to probably affect the cable, but God knows we don't need more flakes from the cable in our tanks :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Dallas, you might be able to imagine how glad I am to here of your successful trip! I’m wondering if fuel mixtures have an impact on how fast or how severe the flaking occurs. Different areas in the US use different seasonal mixes. I have 425 miles on my 2020 AT AS ES DCT. That isn’t 10 gallons of Tennessee mixed unleaded 87 Octane fuel. First tank went in at the dealer in Chattanooga and the second by me here in Cookeville, TN. I used the lizard cam on my tank two days ago and I can see the flaking along the welds. I couldn’t locate the filter with my scope, I didn’t spend a lot of time looking either. I’m still pulling the tank to do a thorough inspection and install the two Guglatech fuel pre-filters.
On the positive note: I hope you never have this issue, period. And I hope I never have to turn my ATAS in for warranty work on the fuel pump.
Even if you could spot the fuel pump, the filter is within the fuel pump plastic casing so you're not going to be able to tell the condition of that without yank'n the tank I'm afraid. IMO, if you're seeing flaking in the tank... you've got plenty in the pre-pump filter :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Even if you could spot the fuel pump, the filter is within the fuel pump plastic casing so you're not going to be able to tell the condition of that without yank'n the tank I'm afraid. IMO, if you're seeing flaking in the tank... you've got plenty in the pre-pump filter :)
From the pictures I saw posted here and the lack of mileage, I knew it would be worthwhile to just pull the tank and the pump, conduct a thorough cleaning, inspection and do whatever is necessary to prevent it from failure. Funny thing Honda has forgotten that gasoline engines need clean fuel, clean air, and good spark in order to run well and last.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I have '17 DCT that I enjoy very much. I'd like to replace it with a 2020 ATAS ES DCT. I want the IMU, tubeless tires and cruise contol. But, I heard there were certain problems. So I've spent the past couple hours reading through most (not all) of the posts.
A couple things.
1. The problem is in the tank welds so STOP TALKING ABOUT GAS! The tanks are made with galvanized steel for corrosion resistance. Welding seams in the tank vaporises the zinc coating some of which deposits as zinc oxide. There is probably some magnetic (iron) weld spatter in there as well. Honda may or may not apply something to the welds to restore corrosion resistance lost to the weld. The zinc oxide is soluable in acids, which is why a vinegar rinse may be effective.
Somewhere in their process it didn't go as planned, but they got a lot of these tanks.

2. Honda is not <still> producing tanks with a faulty process. When they designed the 2018 ATAS they committed , internally, to use that tank design for years. They don't fire up a tank production line every year to make some more, they fired it up ONE TIME, made hundreds (thousands?) and put them in a warehouse. Your 2020 ATAS tank was made in the same run as the 2018s. Thus the problem persists across years.

Now my problem is, do I wait another year to see if there is an official resolution, or, do I buy one and drive it straight home and clean the tank?

First world problems.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,730 Posts
Now my problem is, do I wait another year to see if there is an official resolution, or, do I buy one and drive it straight home and clean the tank?

First world problems.
Unless there is an official recall that makes Honda take some other course of action, you may as well get 2020 take it straight home, and clean the tank. Without one, the issue probably will not be resolved in 2021 either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I have '17 DCT that I enjoy very much. I'd like to replace it with a 2020 ATAS ES DCT. I want the IMU, tubeless tires and cruise contol. But, I heard there were certain problems. So I've spent the past couple hours reading through most (not all) of the posts.
A couple things.
1. The problem is in the tank welds so STOP TALKING ABOUT GAS! The tanks are made with galvanized steel for corrosion resistance. Welding seams in the tank vaporises the zinc coating some of which deposits as zinc oxide. There is probably some magnetic (iron) weld spatter in there as well. Honda may or may not apply something to the welds to restore corrosion resistance lost to the weld. The zinc oxide is soluable in acids, which is why a vinegar rinse may be effective.
Somewhere in their process it didn't go as planned, but they got a lot of these tanks.

2. Honda is not <still> producing tanks with a faulty process. When they designed the 2018 ATAS they committed , internally, to use that tank design for years. They don't fire up a tank production line every year to make some more, they fired it up ONE TIME, made hundreds (thousands?) and put them in a warehouse. Your 2020 ATAS tank was made in the same run as the 2018s. Thus the problem persists across years.

Now my problem is, do I wait another year to see if there is an official resolution, or, do I buy one and drive it straight home and clean the tank?

First world problems.
Well okaaaaaaay then, lol.. welcome to the conversation.

It's got what you want, ride it home and spend the relatively little amount of time to do the preventative work on it and then enjoy it. I've said all along, it's disappointing but it's not something that would've swayed my decision to buy it. I do wonder how much more difficult it is to clean right out of the crate vs after it being exposed to the conditions that seem to exacerbate it. Share some pics of what it looks like when/if you do, please.

For anyone not mechanically inclined and would have to resort the dealer repairs/remediation as the only course of action, then my advice would probably be to wait or pass on the purchase.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
I have '17 DCT that I enjoy very much. I'd like to replace it with a 2020 ATAS ES DCT. I want the IMU, tubeless tires and cruise contol. But, I heard there were certain problems. So I've spent the past couple hours reading through most (not all) of the posts.
A couple things.
1. The problem is in the tank welds so STOP TALKING ABOUT GAS! The tanks are made with galvanized steel for corrosion resistance. Welding seams in the tank vaporises the zinc coating some of which deposits as zinc oxide. There is probably some magnetic (iron) weld spatter in there as well. Honda may or may not apply something to the welds to restore corrosion resistance lost to the weld. The zinc oxide is soluable in acids, which is why a vinegar rinse may be effective.
Somewhere in their process it didn't go as planned, but they got a lot of these tanks.

2. Honda is not <still> producing tanks with a faulty process. When they designed the 2018 ATAS they committed , internally, to use that tank design for years. They don't fire up a tank production line every year to make some more, they fired it up ONE TIME, made hundreds (thousands?) and put them in a warehouse. Your 2020 ATAS tank was made in the same run as the 2018s. Thus the problem persists across years.

Now my problem is, do I wait another year to see if there is an official resolution, or, do I buy one and drive it straight home and clean the tank?

First world problems.
There is a bit of sarcasm injected into the discussion on gas, since Honda Service managers are tending to blame it on bad gas, leaves in the tank etc. I’ve noticed that the problem appeared to develop within less miles on the east coast compared to some posts from guys on the west coast. So what you’re stating is that chemical makeup of the gasoline can no way exacerbate the problem and clog the filter sooner than later. Also, that the outside temperature the tank and gasoline are exposed to will not speed up the oxidation rate of fuel contamination. By the way, it is the fuel that will carry the particulate into the filter and fuel pumps. Most of us aren’t experts on welding galvanized steel and tend to speculate on the issue, and some tend to make jokes about what the Honda “experts” are blaming it on. Myself, I’m going to deal with it instead of holding my breath waiting for Honda to issue a recall and do the right thing. I will, however, in the future consider not purchasing another new Honda. This is my second new Honda in three years with serious engineering/manufacturing errors. Dam, am I stupid.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,730 Posts
The 2020 tanks are a completely different shape. New tank same problems.
I thought one of the reasons they went to a different tank shape on the 2020 was because they had determined the issue with the 18/19 models and made a manufacturing change. But then the reports began about the 2020 models as well.



Sent from my SM-N975U1 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Your 2020 ATAS tank was made in the same run as the 2018s
I do not believe any company will make a "run" or production of a part for 3 years worth of sales. In this case let's say some 30.000 tanks for worldwide market ATAS sales.
Specifically as other members above say, the 2020 is another shape. Then, I doubt they made 2 shapes of tanks in 2018, one for 18's and 19's, and other for 20's
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,942 Posts
I do not believe any company will make a "run" or production of a part for 3 years worth of sales. In this case let's say some 30.000 tanks for worldwide market ATAS sales.
Specifically as other members above say, the 2020 is another shape. Then, I doubt they made 2 shapes of tanks in 2018, one for 18's and 19's, and other for 20's
Sounds like an opportunity for an aftermarket tank design to step-in and offer an alternative. The problem is: A new Honda owner will likely have a problem spending even more money on something that should have worked without issue in the first place.
 
661 - 680 of 698 Posts
Top