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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey there guys.
I’ve been fiddling around with my new Africa Twin and have had a few accidental (yet successful wheelies) and I’m wondering what settings need to be turned off (or on) to be able to reliably wheelie ?

Do I need to turn down the Honda traction control / torque limitation in addition to lowering wheelie control setting ? Or is the wheelie control enough ?
Any additional tips regarding what settings or even what gear to be in would be much appreciated.
 

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2021 Africa Twin 1100
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Wheelie control 3 only pulls the bike all the way through the fork and then stops. Wheelie control 2 allows lower ish wheelies, Wheelie control 1 allows you to basically send it straight up into the sky.

I can wheelie with TC in 7, however it will sometimes cut power when it steps out a little on initial takeoff; on the road I usually run TC3 or less.

My usual road setting is TC3, W1, with Throttle 2. Throttle 1 is a little too jerky in traffic as far as I'm concerned.

In first gear all you have to do is ride c.a. 30kph, close the throttle a sec and then whip it; it'll come right up. In other gears you'll need the good ole clutch-up. That said, with the weight of this bike you'll probably make your fork seals and headstock bearings cry out loud by wheelie-ing it too often.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wheelie control 3 only pulls the bike all the way through the fork and then stops. Wheelie control 2 allows lower ish wheelies, Wheelie control 1 allows you to basically send it straight up into the sky.

I can wheelie with TC in 7, however it will sometimes cut power when it steps out a little on initial takeoff; on the road I usually run TC3 or less.

My usual road setting is TC3, W1, with Throttle 2. Throttle 1 is a little too jerky in traffic as far as I'm concerned.

In first gear all you have to do is ride c.a. 30kph, close the throttle a sec and then whip it; it'll come right up. In other gears you'll need the good ole clutch-up. That said, with the weight of this bike you'll probably make your fork seals and headstock bearings cry out loud by wheelie-ing it too often.
Wow this is amazing detail and a great response. Thank u so much. !!
One quick question and this might sound silly but what is the “clutch up”? Is that when u clutch in while rolling and dump clutch and rip throttle ?
 

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What kind of settings would you use on a 2019 ATAS?
I would suggest 0 on the TC
Although I regularly pull the front wheel off the ground, usually I just skim the wheel 2 inches or so high, this way I don’t draw to much attention. Just incase there’s a cop around that I didn’t notice, normally I can let it go for a few seconds, but occasionally the traction control will kick in because I let it go to far and the front wheel spin starts to slow to much, the ECU looks for a difference between front and rear wheel speed to determine if the rear wheel is slipping; so for any wheelie’s on pre-2020 model’s you are better off with turning the TC off.
 
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2021 Africa Twin 1100
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Wow this is amazing detail and a great response. Thank u so much. !!
One quick question and this might sound silly but what is the “clutch up”? Is that when u clutch in while rolling and dump clutch and rip throttle ?
A proper clutch up is the act of throwing your weight onto the front fork while quickly pulling the clutch, giving a blip of throttle and then dumping the clutch while moving your weight back as the front fork decompresses. That said, it really ****s up your clutch and the standard clutch on the AT is alright at best, it doesn't take hooliganism or extreme offroad riding that well. Clutch ups also cause the friction plates that sit in the basket to run into the edges and **** it up eventually due to the sudden loading, so I recommend getting a Rekluse with sleeves if you're really serious about your hooliganism. OEM clutch plates are no biggie as they cost like €80 for a set.

Clutch ups are useful for getting weight of the front wheel when you inevitably have to get over some bigger piece of wood or rock while on the trail. That said, offroad it's usually better to run TC1 or just off entirely as TC will probably get you stuck in the dirt sometime.
 

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I have to have the TC completely off to do any kind of sustained wheelie, otherwise it cuts power once the front wheel slows.

I would definitely make sure you are proficient at wheelieing a bicycle before you start hooning an AT, it is a veeeery heavy and topheavy bike to learn on.

Transferring your own body weight and knowing where you yourself should be moving to stay balanced is way more important a skill to have than knowing how to pop the front end up. Get good at stomping the pegs so you get a good drive of traction into soft terrain, which is where you would actually need to loft up over a log or something, and get in the habit of ending EVERY wheelie with a very gentle press of the rear brake, even if it is not needed to bring you down. Because eventually you WILL go too far back and that subconscious muscle memory is the only thing that's gonna stop you from looping it.

Do I have to say always cover the rear brake any time the front wheel is off the ground? I hope not..
 
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