Honda Africa Twin Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of July's Ride of the Month Challenge! Theme: Drop it like it's hot!
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
725 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gang,
As some of you read a while ago, I dropped my ONE WEEK OLD '18 AT/AS DCT on the street, at about zero mph, while making a U-turn and hit some sand on the pavement. BIG MISTAKE. Lesson learned. Anyway, that fall caused a broken front brake handle. And yes, there's specified point in that brake handle where IT'S SUPPOSED TO BREAK in the event of a fall or, any other hard contact with that brake handle. Well, I ordered up a brand new brake handle and also, the black plastic knuckle (as Honda labels it) due to it was damaged too.

But, in the mean time, I decided to weld up my broken brake handle 'cause, I knew Honda is not the speediest in getting supplies and I didn't want to run/ride that bike around with a broken stubby brake handle. That looks tacky. So, I welded it up.

Now, as to the "Hint" I'm referring to in my post heading. In the pics, you'll see what I call, a Stepped or Flanged washer. There's actually two of them that are involved in the retaining of that brake handle. One is on top of the black plastic knuckle and one is below it. Both fit inside that knuckle and, around the bolt that secures the handle. The top one, if you look close, is still on the bolt, as it's removed. But, the bottom one, CAN FALL away from the assembly and, the first time I did it, it fell down inside the crevasse that's between the tank and the frame. I had no idea what I was looking for. All I knew was, something fell when I removed that nut and bolt that secured that brake handle and, I heard it hit the tank and something a bit more solid.

I did NOT hear it hit the floor, CRAP! I searched all over but, no luck. Then, I got lucky. I broke out my trusty LED flashlight and started looking down inside that crevasse. Low and behold, that washer was wedged in between the tanks an frame. Now, to get it out without causing it to fall even deeper into the black hole. I got it out. Whew, that was close. Anyway, to prevent from some of you from experiencing the same potential dilemma of losing that little stepped washer, here's a plan. If and when you plan on either replacing or, like in my case, repairing that front brake handle, before you remove either the nut or the bolt from that brake handle, lay a towel over the gas tank directly under that area you're working. Now, if that little washer or, even the nut falls, it will fall on the towel and, not the abyss.
Scott


P.S. The first pic is of the welded handle. The others show the parts involved, including the stepped washer in question. By the way, yes, those are two different brake handles. The one I welded apparently sustained enough of an impact during the fall that it actually bent the tip some, before it broke. The one on the towel is a new one. You can see how it is considerably straighter, almost all the way to the tip than the repaired/welded one. No biggie, the welded one feels just fine in my fingers. I'm running the welded one instead of the new one just so, in the unlikely event the big girl decides to take another nap, dirt or street, and breaks that handle, it will break the welded one, not the new one.
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: DoubleThumper

·
Keeping’em Moderatorated
2018 Adventure Sports DCT
Joined
·
2,976 Posts
Gang,
As some of you read a while ago, I dropped my ONE WEEK OLD '18 AT/AS DCT on the street, at about zero mph, while making a U-turn and hit some sand on the pavement. BIG MISTAKE. Lesson learned. Anyway, that fall caused a broken front brake handle. And yes, there's specified point in that brake handle where IT'S SUPPOSED TO BREAK in the event of a fall or, any other hard contact with that brake handle. Well, I ordered up a brand new brake handle and also, the black plastic knuckle (as Honda labels it) due to it was damaged too.

But, in the mean time, I decided to weld up my broken brake handle 'cause, I knew Honda is not the speediest in getting supplies and I didn't want to run/ride that bike around with a broken stubby brake handle. That looks tacky. So, I welded it up.

Now, as to the "Hint" I'm referring to in my post heading. In the pics, you'll see what I call, a Stepped or Flanged washer. There's actually two of them that are involved in the retaining of that brake handle. One is on top of the black plastic knuckle and one is below it. Both fit inside that knuckle and, around the bolt that secures the handle. The top one, if you look close, is still on the bolt, as it's removed. But, the bottom one, CAN FALL away from the assembly and, the first time I did it, it fell down inside the crevasse that's between the tank and the frame. I had no idea what I was looking for. All I knew was, something fell when I removed that nut and bolt that secured that brake handle and, I heard it hit the tank and something a bit more solid.

I did NOT hear it hit the floor, CRAP! I searched all over but, no luck. Then, I got lucky. I broke out my trusty LED flashlight and started looking down inside that crevasse. Low and behold, that washer was wedged in between the tanks an frame. Now, to get it out without causing it to fall even deeper into the black hole. I got it out. Whew, that was close. Anyway, to prevent from some of you from experiencing the same potential dilemma of losing that little stepped washer, here's a plan. If and when you plan on either replacing or, like in my case, repairing that front brake handle, before you remove either the nut or the bolt from that brake handle, lay a towel over the gas tank directly under that area you're working. Now, if that little washer or, even the nut falls, it will fall on the towel and, not the abyss.
Scott


P.S. The first pic is of the welded handle. The others show the parts involved, including the stepped washer in question. By the way, yes, those are two different brake handles. The one I welded apparently sustained enough of an impact during the fall that it actually bent the tip some, before it broke. The one on the towel is a new one. You can see how it is considerably straighter, almost all the way to the tip than the repaired/welded one. No biggie, the welded one feels just fine in my fingers. I'm running the welded one instead of the new one just so, in the unlikely event the big girl decides to take another nap, dirt or street, and breaks that handle, it will break the welded one, not the new one.
The engineers at Honda spent hundreds of thousands of hours planning and engineering the Africa Twin so that when someone is working on it and drops anything it will ALWAYS fall into a crack, they also made it so a lot of the "fixed" nuts come loose and do the same; just as a added bonus. I have to say they did an excellent job in achieving their goal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
The engineers at Honda spent hundreds of thousands of hours planning and engineering the Africa Twin so that when someone is working on it and drops anything it will ALWAYS fall into a crack, they also made it so a lot of the "fixed" nuts come loose and do the same; just as a added bonus. I have to say they did an excellent job in achieving their goal.
I wanted something shorter than the OEM and something that if my Bark Busters did not adequately take up the hit would not break quite so easily. I purchase these and have been quite happy with them for over a year. Extending Brake Clutch lever Set For Honda CRF1000L Africa twin 2015-2017 | eBay
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,359 Posts
The engineers at Honda spent hundreds of thousands of hours planning and engineering the Africa Twin so that when someone is working on it and drops anything it will ALWAYS fall into a crack, they also made it so a lot of the "fixed" nuts come loose and do the same; just as a added bonus. I have to say they did an excellent job in achieving their goal.
I thought that was with every motorcycle?

54965
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
725 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The engineers at Honda spent hundreds of thousands of hours planning and engineering the Africa Twin so that when someone is working on it and drops anything it will ALWAYS fall into a crack, they also made it so a lot of the "fixed" nuts come loose and do the same; just as a added bonus. I have to say they did an excellent job in achieving their goal.
Yes sir, I do believe you are exactly correct. And, their hidden zone of dropped nuts and bolts, does not JUST apply to the Twin. It HEAVILY applies to the Goldwing as well. There are hundreds, if not thousands of Wing owners running around with quite an assortment of nuts, bolts, washers, spacers, wrenches, screwdrivers and more, down in the UNKNOWN ZONE/DARK HOLE of the belly of their Wings. And believe me, you DON'T want to go digging around trying to find what you lost. You'd rather go several hundred miles to a Honda dealer to get the correct nut, before you'd become a surgical master and discect that Wing enough to find what you lost. Been there done that!
Scott
 
  • Like
Reactions: AT-Dragon
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top