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Discussion Starter #1
Went to do my pre-ride inspection this morning and found what appears to be a roofing nail embedded in my OEM Dunlop. Weird thing is, the tire is holding pressure.

I wanted to upgrade to Mitas E-07's anyway, so I will take the opportunity to buy new tires and tubes. My question is; which tubes? I don't have any experience with tube tires and I want to know if there is any advantage to buying a heavier tube. I have read that a heavier tube can cause handling problems during high speed road riding. Is this the case? Am I less likely to have a puncture if I have a heavier tube?

Thanks in advance for any advice.

 

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From what I read, the heavy duty tubes prevent pinch flats. My dealer told me all they could get was the "Dakar" version of the tire, which has thicker sidewalls that guard against pinch flats anyway. I don't have much experience with tubes, but that is what I have inferred from reading.
 

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Hi pavnryn, there is lots of information on tube types in Forum's and on the web.
One thing I have learnt, is if you carry a spare tube to replace a punctured one, then brand and type don't matter that much.
But if you want to repair a punctured tube with a patch kit, then make sure you fit a 100% Natural Rubber tube,
the other type Butal Rubber will most likely split or tear once punctured making it useless to repair.
I have also learnt to do both, fit a carry spare Natural Rubber tubes as well as a patch repair kit.
Be prepared :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
From what I read, the heavy duty tubes prevent pinch flats. My dealer told me all they could get was the "Dakar" version of the tire, which has thicker sidewalls that guard against pinch flats anyway.
There was another poster on this board that mentioned the Dakar version is difficult to mount on your own - particularly out in the field - because of the very stiff sidewall. I am not riding any single track, mostly fire roads and hunting roads so I think I am going to try the standard version. I want to be self sufficient when I am riding alone, so I'm going to mount them at home and see how it goes.

if you carry a spare tube to replace a punctured one, then brand and type don't matter that much. But if you want to repair a punctured tube with a patch kit, then make sure you fit a 100% Natural Rubber tube
From what I have been reading in the various forums, natural rubber definitely looks like the way to go, most riders seem to think natural rubber deflates slower in the event of a puncture. That makes sense in light of your comment that butyl tubes tend to tear or split. But I also read that natural rubber loses air faster on a day to day basis - have you noticed that? I check my tires every ride, so it shouldn't be an issue.
 

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From what I have been reading in the various forums, natural rubber definitely looks like the way to go, most riders seem to think natural rubber deflates slower in the event of a puncture. That makes sense in light of your comment that butyl tubes tend to tear or split. But I also read that natural rubber loses air faster on a day to day basis - have you noticed that? I check my tires every ride, so it shouldn't be an issue.
Yea, I have heard and been told this many times as well, that Rubber Tubes loose pressure, guess what, it's true, I checked my pressures and after 2 weeks the rear lost 2psi, wow big deal!
I think, (for people who ride frequently) if anyone doesn't check their M/C tire pressures at least every week as well as other components, than you shouldn't be allowed to ride one of these wonderful machines, part of the riding experience is making sure your equipment is up to scratch. Am I right ? :)
 

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On my trip to Portugal (aug 2016) I did 8000 Km and I had to check every week. Lost about 0.2 bar every week so you have to check many times. On my VFR1200F (Tubeless) have to check every month and most of the time the stay at there pressure.
 

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There was another poster on this board that mentioned the Dakar version is difficult to mount on your own - particularly out in the field - because of the very stiff sidewall. I am not riding any single track, mostly fire roads and hunting roads so I think I am going to try the standard version. I want to be self sufficient when I am riding alone, so I'm going to mount them at home and see how it goes.



From what I have been reading in the various forums, natural rubber definitely looks like the way to go, most riders seem to think natural rubber deflates slower in the event of a puncture. That makes sense in light of your comment that butyl tubes tend to tear or split. But I also read that natural rubber loses air faster on a day to day basis - have you noticed that? I check my tires every ride, so it shouldn't be an issue.
Unfortuanately my dealership couldnt get the non-Dakar version, I hope you have better luck than I did!
 

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The thing to be careful about with tubes is matching your tube to the intended usage. Typically the thicker the tube the more puncture resistant it is but also the hotter it will run. Heat is generated when the tire (and therefore the tube) flexes during operation. The greater the flex the greater the heat generated (this is one of the reasons why lower tire pressures are not really suitable for the highway where frequency of flex is higher). Thicker tubes generate more heat as they flex and therefore run hotter. A tube running too hot can also fail. If you look at the stock tubes on an Africa Twin you will find that they are really quite thin. This means that they will run cooler at sustained high speeds with reduced risk of blow out but will also pinch flat relatively easily. Real heavy duty tubes are resistant to pinch flats but are less suitable for sustained high speed use. Of course there are intermediates between the two that are sometimes a good compromise. Friction generated between the tube and the tire as they flex independently from each other also contributes to overall operating temperature but this can be somewhat reduced by rubbing talc on the tubes before installation. Heavy duty tubes are also a lot heavier which affects the unsprung weight of the wheel assembly (not ideal for suspension control) and will often make balancing of the wheel more difficult (more weight required).
 

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Have written to Avon for their advice as I have fitted HD tubes with the RR tyres for road use.
Will await the response and post as it comes.
Interesting thread here.
Z
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Received my new tires and tubes yesterday, I ended up ordering the Michelin UHD tubes - 4mm thick and natural rubber. If I had seen ATDCT's comments first, I would probably still be dithering over what to buy. It seems everything is a trade off with this bike.

Now that they're here, I'm going to spoon them on as soon as the weather gets warm enough. Put the new tubes on the scale, and the rear tube weighs in at 4.6 lbs. I'll weigh the old tubes when I pull them out to try and get a sense of the weight difference.
 

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Received my new tires and tubes yesterday, I ended up ordering the Michelin UHD tubes - 4mm thick and natural rubber. If I had seen ATDCT's comments first, I would probably still be dithering over what to buy. It seems everything is a trade off with this bike.

Now that they're here, I'm going to spoon them on as soon as the weather gets warm enough. Put the new tubes on the scale, and the rear tube weighs in at 4.6 lbs. I'll weigh the old tubes when I pull them out to try and get a sense of the weight difference.
You want to be very careful about using UHD tubes, you are adding considerable unsprung weight (at 4.6 lbs - minus old tube) to your bike which will affect handling, quite considerably at speed. This extra weight is all inertia your bike must overcome, unsprung. If there is a reason you need UHD fair enough, if not, take them off when you can. This is not the same as adding 4.6lbs of sprung weight, e.g. luggage.
 
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