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When remote riding do you carry a ‘old school” map/atlas ?

  • No

    Votes: 7 25.0%
  • Yes

    Votes: 9 32.1%
  • I’m alway in city/towns/villages

    Votes: 1 3.6%
  • I just trust/rely on my GPS

    Votes: 5 17.9%
  • No because I’m not proficient navigating with one

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Yes, and I can somewhat navigate by one

    Votes: 2 7.1%
  • Yes and I’m proficient with map/compass navigation

    Votes: 11 39.3%

  • Total voters
    28
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
OK admittedly I am a tech s l u t, I love technology and me, my bike, my truck, an my home are all seriously wired. But when I do travel I ALWAYS have a non-electronic backup especially when remote traveling on my bike. Luckily for me my home state has (and I carry) a state atlas, a kinda big but well detailed multi page atlas. But It has got everything covered from fire roads (two tracks) , and rail tracks, power line’s and a lot of the larger state trail system, even large drainage ditches..Yea i’m Old school military trained to read and navigate buy maps and compass, but this map is pretty much so detailed that if you have even just some small bit of intelligence and eyesight, getting lost would be.. well let’s put it this way, the law of Darwinism should take you if you get lost with it.

So a question: When traveling on remote adventures do you take a physical map with you ?

And OMG! PLEASE do not say “ I have my phone and it has all the maps I need” Because when I say remote travels, I mean remote travels, places when you gotta travel for an hour(or better) just to get some where WITH a cell signal.
 

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We don't have too many truly remote places in the UK but I just love paper maps. I find that using a satnav alone leaves me cold, yes it will get me from A to B but I want to know what is around me so whether on 50 mile or 350 ride I'll look at the map beforehand and at various points on route.
 

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While I do rely on my GPS I do carry a gazetteer of Colorado with me. There are plenty of remote locations we’ve been and even with a GPS unit we’ve been lost and relied on the paper map and GPS to figure out where we were.. I never leave home without it.

As a side note, by day ride pack includes tools and an MRE in case I’m stuck overnight...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
We don't have too many truly remote places in the UK but I just love paper maps. I find that using a satnav alone leaves me cold, yes it will get me from A to B but I want to know what is around me so whether on 50 mile or 350 ride I'll look at the map beforehand and at various points on route.
Yea I can see that, lol no matter what way you go eventually you will hit the coast line, not to mention the U.K. has been around for a couple of years now so it is fairly well dotted with villages and towns.

While I do rely on my GPS I do carry a gazetteer of Colorado with me. There are plenty of remote locations we’ve been and even with a GPS unit we’ve been lost and relied on the paper map and GPS to figure out where we were.. I never leave home without it.

As a side note, by day ride pack includes tools and an MRE in case I’m stuck overnight...
Yea I got a gazetteer of Michigan, absolutely love that thing. I’ve been a few places where I’ve lost my GPS signal because of tree cover, yes it does come back and update the map when you hit a clearing or lighter tree cover. But I still won’t risk being with out my trusty map and compass...
 

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I'm with the trusty group of Map/Compass people.
TOPO maps are a must for any off the beaten path adventure, Motorcycle, Truck or walking...
 

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And OMG! PLEASE do not say “ I have my phone and it has all the maps I need” Because when I say remote travels, I mean remote travels, places when you gotta travel for an hour(or better) just to get some where WITH a cell signal.
Nothing wrong with going old school, but just as a point of order, you can easily download maps for offline use, no cell signal required. I do it all the time traveling outside the US...
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Nothing wrong with going old school, but just as a point of order, you can easily download maps for offline use, no cell signal required. I do it all the time traveling outside the US...
True, and I happen to have a app like that on my phone... But, my paper maps have never ran out on a battery or “crashed” because of a software issue...
 
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OK admittedly I am a tech s l u t, I love technology and me, my bike, my truck, an my home are all seriously wired. But when I do travel I ALWAYS have a non-electronic backup especially when remote traveling on my bike. Luckily for me my home state has (and I carry) a state atlas, a kinda big but well detailed multi page atlas. But It has got everything covered from fire roads (two tracks) , and rail tracks, power line’s and a lot of the larger state trail system, even large drainage ditches..Yea i’m Old school military trained to read and navigate buy maps and compass, but this map is pretty much so detailed that if you have even just some small bit of intelligence and eyesight, getting lost would be.. well let’s put it this way, the law of Darwinism should take you if you get lost with it.

So a question: When traveling on remote adventures do you take a physical map with you ?

And OMG! PLEASE do not say “ I have my phone and it has all the maps I need” Because when I say remote travels, I mean remote travels, places when you gotta travel for an hour(or better) just to get some where WITH a cell signal.
I always travel with my TomTom and Iphone ... but I ALWAYS have a paper map visible in the tank bag. It is the only way to get a broader view of the route.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I always travel with my TomTom and Iphone ... but I ALWAYS have a paper map visible in the tank bag. It is the only way to get a broader view of the route.
True, that’s also another good point on why to carry one..
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well found another point on what I prefer paper over electronic when it comes to maps at least in running routes or over viewing them. I hate the fact that when zooming in on a area to see something better the roads become bigger but al those tiny descriptions don’t . On a lot of mapping software the writing is the same size tiny font that sometimes is a PITA to read ( lol getting older suxs). Although I will say I do love that on digital maps you can do satellite views...
 

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Some of the riders I know are adamant a GPS should never be on a bike and the rider should only use paper maps. They always seem to overlook or ignore that when using paper you have to stop, dig the map out, refold it and then place it back in the map pouch. The GPS keeps scrolling through as you move from one location to another. I prefer the GPS and always keep one or more paper maps with the bike either for trip planning or in case the GPS fails. My phone is for communication if needed.
 

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I just use the GPS app (e.g. Google Maps) in the mobile device. I have never experienced or heard of the GPS resource failing in a phone.

In addition, when the network goes out-of-range, I switch to an offline app to continue the journey. It will access the GPS signal in the phone and synchronize the pre-downloaded map(s).

More likely the device battery will die, or you will lose or damage it. In that case, find the nearest gas station and acquire a paper map - I spoze?
 

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Moss grows on North side of trees, Sun rises from the East, US Routes are numbered ODD for North & South. Even for East & West.
Lowest Starts in the North East. Three Digits are Connecting or By-Pass. Interstates are Numbered Opposite : Starting in the West and South.
Of Course that's Usually. Just stay off the Interstate....Now that a bit of info that shows my age :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Moss grows on North side of trees, Sun rises from the East, US Routes are numbered ODD for North & South. Even for East & West.
Lowest Starts in the North East. Three Digits are Connecting or By-Pass. Interstates are Numbered Opposite : Starting in the West and South.
Of Course that's Usually. Just stay off the Interstate....Now that a bit of info that shows my age :)
Unfortunately,
Moss is not reliable, clouds cover the sun, and back forest roads don’t always have signs. But true, for a vast majority of times those observations will help you find your way. The moss trick ONLY works in very specific conditions unless you can recognize them never rely on that. Flowing water is a much safer bet (if you can find that), go with the flow. Any man made road will eventually get you somewhere and knowing the above info is a great help at getting you close to where you want to be..
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I just use the GPS app (e.g. Google Maps) in the mobile device. I have never experienced or heard of the GPS resource failing in a phone.

In addition, when the network goes out-of-range, I switch to an offline app to continue the journey. It will access the GPS signal in the phone and synchronize the pre-downloaded map(s).

More likely the device battery will die, or you will lose or damage it. In that case, find the nearest gas station and acquire a paper map - I spoze?
You need to ride with me, I’ve been and can take you places where the woods are deep and thick and I’ve had reception drop for long periods and gas stations or anybody is not some thing you would ever see unless you drive for a while to find it, now that’s not saying that GPS is useless it still works, somewhat, depending on the device it will have some, if not all of the area map and you have the ability to scroll through it and that advantage of knowing the last direction you were headed, so they are very helpful and well worth having. But if you are going places like I do occasionally go, a waterproof backup map and compass is a must.
tho I will add, all this advice so far would work for the vast majority, a lot of adventures are usually not to far from people or some sort of town and the AT has great range, that said, there are many places in North America that it would be just plain stupid not to have some kind of backup.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Some of the riders I know are adamant a GPS should never be on a bike and the rider should only use paper maps. They always seem to overlook or ignore that when using paper you have to stop, dig the map out, refold it and then place it back in the map pouch. The GPS keeps scrolling through as you move from one location to another. I prefer the GPS and always keep one or more paper maps with the bike either for trip planning or in case the GPS fails. My phone is for communication if needed.
A waterproof map and good compass and the ability to properly use them, will never fail you, but there Is nothing wrong with using GPS. Just if you are going some place remote you HAVE to plan on them to definitely fail. Use that trick and plan for it and there are no issues on using them, if fact they are a asset as you pointed out.
 
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