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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I'm considering an Africa Twin after owning a Triumph Tiger 1050 for 10 years and wondered if any members had changed from a tiger to a twin? As I get older its more difficult to move the bike around therefore not going for the Adventure Sport. I have also considered a1200 GS, but obviously more expensive!
Thanks in advance - normally I would go for a test ride, but the weather is appalling and I've spotted some great deals on 2019 models!!
Thanks, John
 

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I'm curious as to why you would think that a 500 pound bike (Twin) would be easier to move around than a 400 pound bike(tiger).
 

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I had a tiger 1050 that I really liked. It was a great bike and now I own an ATAS. I traded the tiger for an Aprilia Caponord, and that bike for the ATAS. The Africa twin is a very comfortable bike to ride, more so for me than the tiger. The ATAS also has more features such as abs and traction control and is more suited to dirt roads.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Hi Mudslilingr,
My ABS model Tiger is 443 lbs dry so wet 20litres fuel + oil guess 490+ and it carries its weight high I believe?
I believe the Honda weight is wet and I assume includes ABS.
So maybe not much difference!
 

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Be aware that even the regular AT is a big bike physically. I'm 6'4" and even I find the AT to be challenging in certain situations such as pushing it around or mounting and dismounting on uneven terrain. If you struggle with the Tiger, you'll struggle with the AT, that's the reality of it. Now, once you're rolling it's a gem.
 

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Hi John,

While testing some bikes at the beginning of 2019, the AT had me smiling and had grabbed me within the first few hundred yards of the test ride. I knew straight away that this was the machine for me. I am an old sod who only rides for fun in good weather, this thing takes 30 years off me when I'm on it and I forget about all the aches and pain of age. I would say that you must find time time to try it before committing yourself. I would also say these forums dig around in the issues and sometimes lack balance. My AT has been absolutely fault free, I do love and take care of it well!

Wherever you end up Sir, have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi Noivson,

Haha your quote made me laugh.

My Tiger is the later model by the way.

Thanks for your input
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi Ray Collington - I'm fit but over 70 so I get you.

I've booked a test ride on one tomorrow.

I bought a Honda Varadero 15 years ago without test riding one and discovered I'd bought an elephant!

Thanks for all your comments.

I shall report back!!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks, Allen for your comments
 

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Hi John,

At our age we have probably had a lifetime of buyer remorse, usually started by marketing hype or a hungry salesman. I keep telling myself I need to stop having to get myself out of situations that I shouldn't have gotten myself into, sadly it still sometimes happens. The other issue is there is so much choice in this sector. Due to a 30" inside leg, I had to avoid the AS version and run the standard version with the seat in the lower setting. After a career in the truck industry and having had a gutful of automated transmission headaches, I decided to go with the least complicated gearbox option. Not sure if this was the right decision, it just means I will never have DCT issues to contend with. This opinion has earned me stick from the DCT fans.

I don't know if they still exist, there were some good deals around in the UK earlier this year. Everybody has to eat but you don't want the salesman driving a Bentley on you!

A young man says "he who hesitates is lost" the older guys says "act in haste, repent at leisure" but you already know this.

Good luck!
 

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The AT is so tall compared to other bikes I have that I always feel a little uncertain of its balance when pushing it around, and I'm tall. But once it's rolling, it changes. Pretty easy to keep my feet up in very slow traffic (well below walking pace).
 

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I see the specs on the 1050 say wet weight of 517 lbs. My Atas is listed as 533 lbs. So very little difference in weight of the 2 bikes. Given the atas hold 6.4 gal vs 5.3. Of the triumph brings the weight even closer. The atas sits a bit higher.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Interesting how important first impressions are!
I called into my local Honda dealer for a test ride on a used 2019 AT which I had booked the day before to be greeted by surprised salesman and no bike ready to ride but after a phone call and 50 minute delay one was produced an ex Honda off road school bike- not the bike I was interested in, but hey ho.
The one I rode today had done only 2000 miles - in the pouring rain so couldn't really hammer it, but my observations are as follows
1, Seemed slightly taller than my Tiger but managed flat feet down with seat on high no problem and I'm 6ft 1" and certainly not intimidating.
2, Bars felt a little wide, but it was good manoeuvring in all the traffic and a great view ahead.
3, Gearbox felt very slightly notchy, but it was easy up and down the box and clutchless up changes no problem.
4, Performance was good with a really sporty exhaust note - loved this!
5, Throttle was slightly snatchy in a 20mph zone in second gear. but so is my Tiger at times.
6, Brakes felt good - slightly better than I'm used to.
7, Lots of information especially useful gear indicator; from the instruments, but the display is definitely a bit dim.
8, I love the Tricolour - blue metallic with red and white and gold bars and wheels.
9, I Hate the spoked wheels running tubed tyres which obviously can't be plugged!!
10, Riding my Tiger back home I was impressed with the super smoothness and power of the triple!?!?
11, Overall It felt different and I'm impressed, but I think I might test ride a used BMW1200GS next but that could be too heavy? or jump in and buy the Africa twin?!?
I called into my local BMW dealer on the way home to look at some used 1200 GS's and greeted with a warm welcome, and the receptionist even dried out my sodden gloves befor I left - I was also offered a test ride on the spot
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hello,
I was very tempted to buy a used 2019 manual AT in tricolour I had spotted, but many of the problem posts have put me off.
I do realise the internet can have many negative posts and few positive - i.e. if its good nothing to report/post!
These seem to be a problem
1, Blown fork seals
2, Tank venting /fuel pump issues.
3, Documented gearbox problems.
4, Honda quality does not seem to be what it was. I have owned 2 Hondas previously with no issues!
5, Wire wheels with tubes - BMW's wire wheels are tubed.

Are the 2019 models any better?

Thanks for any responses, but I'm used to reliability. My tiger 1050 has only cost me one blown fork seal in all its 10 years.
 

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John, the list of problems you describe is exaggerated, yes there have been some blown fork seals but there are no major issues with the fuel pump or gearbox, at least for the manual version. One other issue you did not mention is the internal fork wear at the point of the lower clamp, but again in the vast majority of cases this does not affect fork operation. The bike is extremely reliable and many riders are riding them to remote parts of the globe without any support / issues (I have taken mine to Kyrgyztan / border of Mongolia and to the Moroccan Sahara, 40K trouble-free miles so far on all sorts of terrains).

The CRF really shines for riders who take it off-road / adventure riding and in this use it has almost no peers, especially for longer trips with luggage, but if it is to be used mostly on tarmac there are certainly better options (with 19/17 tubeless wheels for a start).
 

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Discussion Starter #17
XLGeorge,

Thanks for your reply.

Enjoy many more trouble-free kilometres!
 

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John

There are lot of brands and models I wouldn't touch with a bargepole. I have a late 2018 build bike and it is absolutely fine with no issues whatsoever. Given the high number of these bikes Honda have sold, it is inevitable that the issue feedback finds its way here. Look at any bike forum and you will see the unhappy stories and even German manufacturers have issues. There are a lot of satisfied AT owners and while there were some issues with early models, they seem to have been overcome. The ongoing tubed tyre/off road debate is one to consider although I carry the means of dealing with this. Proof that one mans meat is another mans poison. I would also add that some bikes do not receive a lot of TLC in the cleaning and maintenance department which doesn't help.

If your research still points you in the direction of the AT, don't let this put you off. This also of course depends on proximity and quality of your local dealers.

Good luck Sir!
 

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John,

My last bike was a 2016 AT number 342 in the UK so a early version. I didn,t have any issue with the bike. The switches where replaced under a call back but I didn’t have issues with it. Same with the recall of the centre stand not a big issue.
But I be honest when I read all the things on some forums I was thinking o **** what do I have to do buying a other bike because this CRF1000 is not good. So I looked to the GS and KTM then I found out that my AT is not so bad. My brother in law has a GS and told me his issues now believe I me was not happy with that. My son with his KTM same and daddy which his honda which is according some forum users is also a **** bike zero issues.
I investigated some stories:
The forks so I opened them and I didn,t see anything. Hyperpro is here in the area and even they say there is not wrong. But what also tell is that you have replace your ol of your forks every 2 year or if you do a lot of off road earlier. Reason the innerspring is bending against your innerpipe that steel on steel and then you go smal part in your oil. When you wait to long it becomes is everywhere and then your are damage your forkseals and wearing.
The people who changed the sprockets on a DCT didn’t realize that the electronics couldn’t handle because the rotation speed was changed.
My conclusion:
The story behind it is often totally different many times it is there own fault due wrong use or maintenance or there expectations where not as they want. In some cases it is a dealer with bad services but that we also with cars and has nothing to do with the brand.

Internet is nice but there is also a lot of crap on it. Make your own choice on your feeling and test the bike which you think from that could be something for me. Rent it for a day and enjoy it a seat you can change but the feeling that you are one with your bike not. If it not feels good don’t buy it.
I have changed my bike for the new 2020 ATAS DCT that is the bike which fitted to me.

Good luck with find your new bike.

Frank
 

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I got over 20,000 miles on my 2016 manual. Only problem has been a leaky fork seal. I ran a home made seal saver through kit and it has re sealed and has been good for the last 5000 miles. I have replaced air filters, oil and oil filter every 5k, chain and sprockets at 17,000, tubes once, i'm on 4th set of tires. Everything else is stock other than a bolt on rack and some crash protection with no issues at all. I think it is a great bike and is built better than most on the market and it is a blast to ride.
 
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