Honda Africa Twin Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have had Alpina Tubeless wheels fitted to my ATAS for 16 months. So far no air loss at all. I was initially expecting a bit of air loss due to so many O rings but that hasn't been the case.
I would be interested to hear from others with Alpina wheels regarding air tightness
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Just curious, is it just a personal choice going tubless on the AT or is there another reason ? I've thrown tubes in tubeless tires some times in the past. My reason mainly was cuz of to many nail punctures and plugs. Can you ride off road ? Raise and lower the pressure to suit the terrain ?

Sent from my KYOCERA-E6560 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Can tubeless be aired up and down when going off road ?

Sent from my KYOCERA-E6560 using Tapatalk

Yes they can. Many bike likes the 1250GS, Triumph Scrambler 1200, RnineT Scrambler have tubeless wheels. You can always put a tube in a tubeless wheel if that's your thing, but personally I prefer tubeless as it takes 5 minutes to fix if you run over a nail. With a tube you're in for quite a job, if you don't have a center stand, and haven't practiced many times in ideal conditions.


If I decide to throw money at the bike, these are the ones I'm getting. As opposed to o-rings, the spokes are attached from the outside:
https://www.bikehps.com/acatalog/Kineo-Wire-Spoked-Wheels-Honda-CRF1000L-Africa-Twin-2015-onwards.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Yes they can. Many bike likes the 1250GS, Triumph Scrambler 1200, RnineT Scrambler have tubeless wheels. You can always put a tube in a tubeless wheel if that's your thing, but personally I prefer tubeless as it takes 5 minutes to fix if you run over a nail. With a tube you're in for quite a job, if you don't have a center stand, and haven't practiced many times in ideal conditions.


If I decide to throw money at the bike, these are the ones I'm getting. As opposed to o-rings, the spokes are attached from the outside:
https://www.bikehps.com/acatalog/Kineo-Wire-Spoked-Wheels-Honda-CRF1000L-Africa-Twin-2015-onwards.html
Wow....those are some nice rims.

Sent from my KYOCERA-E6560 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I agree that the Kineo are the best engineered of the spoked tubeless wheels. The Alpina have proved to be airtight but a wheel without seals has to be better
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
410 Posts
There was a post on one of the CRF groups on FB recently. A UK owner practically giving away a set of Alpinas that leaked front and rear. Looks like he found a home for them as the post has been removed.

Alpina have changed their manufacturing process recently (rims are now forged) and the prices have gone up.. almost to the point at which Kineos are competive. Not quite.. but not far off.

Ive been very happy with mine. Not so sparkly as some I've seen. but exactly what I wanted. I still do think its regrettable that Honda did not use tubeless spoked wheels like they have on the VFR variant and the X-ADV.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Any way you look at it, these rims are an expensive upgrade.

Personally, I would need a very compelling usecase (outside of bling) to upgrade to such rims just to go tubless.

If the thought of a complex trailside repair of a punctured tubed tyre daunts you, just take along some emergency "puncture repair in a tin" along.
I have heard reports that people who had had a puncture (not slashes or other massive damage off course, but then again tubless will be no better), repaired it with said "in-tin repair foam", and have gone on to ride the tyre out (till it wears out) without having to change tube again.

The most compelling (but still not quite enough to take me over the line) is the idea of running 2 sets of tyres on the bike. I live in Europe and offroad is something you need to go and search for. There are few open trails around. Typically I need to ride at least 400km to reach any meaningful dirt.
i.e. stock set fitted with street friendly tyres, and a tubless pair on the sexy rims with offroad bias tyres. (or visa versa)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Any way you look at it, these rims are an expensive upgrade.



Personally, I would need a very compelling usecase (outside of bling) to upgrade to such rims just to go tubless.



If the thought of a complex trailside repair of a punctured tubed tyre daunts you, just take along some emergency "puncture repair in a tin" along.

I have heard reports that people who had had a puncture (not slashes or other massive damage off course, but then again tubless will be no better), repaired it with said "in-tin repair foam", and have gone on to ride the tyre out (till it wears out) without having to change tube again.



The most compelling (but still not quite enough to take me over the line) is the idea of running 2 sets of tyres on the bike. I live in Europe and offroad is something you need to go and search for. There are few open trails around. Typically I need to ride at least 400km to reach any meaningful dirt.

i.e. stock set fitted with street friendly tyres, and a tubless pair on the sexy rims with offroad bias tyres. (or visa versa)
Extra tubes and a $3 repair kit for me.

Sent from my KYOCERA-E6560 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
410 Posts
I think you will find that anyone who moves over to tubeless do it for perfectly justifiable reasons. The only reason we do it is because we have been forced to. Honda in their wisdom released the bike with flawed wheel rims a huge number of which have been subject to warranty claims and replacement. And in some cases these replacements have themselves been faulty.
Honda could have avoided all this by releasing the bikes with the same type of wheels that are on the ADV-X and VFR variant. So buyers weren't faced with this dilemma. BMW and Triumoh owners don't have this issue to deal with. There are a large number of owners for whom the stock wheels are perfect. But there are also a large number who will never go off road and tubes are nothing short of a liability. Each to there own. But the fault, the root cause of all this is a bad decision by Honda. It will be interesting to see if this decision is changed on the 2020 1100cc bike.

My own decision was very simple and hardly painful at all. I had budgeted to pay full price for the bike, but when the moment came I was offered a very nice discount and that cash saved meant the new wheels cost about £600. Money I had put aside for panniers. They can wait... I'm in no rush.

The wheels weren't the only bad decision for the bike. The stupid 2a powersocket is a waste of time. I'm unlikely to ever use it. Instead I shall be installing a 15a socket in the next few weeks. A tool box that requires a hex key. A storage compartment that isn't "easy open" air filters that are a pain and valves and plugs that are an expensive nightmare to check/replace. But despite all that, these bikes are fantastic.. We all do what we think is right for ourselves, to suit our own needs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
I think you will find that anyone who moves over to tubeless do it for perfectly justifiable reasons. The only reason we do it is because we have been forced to. Honda in their wisdom released the bike with flawed wheel rims a huge number of which have been subject to warranty claims and replacement. And in some cases these replacements have themselves been faulty.

Honda could have avoided all this by releasing the bikes with the same type of wheels that are on the ADV-X and VFR variant. So buyers weren't faced with this dilemma. BMW and Triumoh owners don't have this issue to deal with. There are a large number of owners for whom the stock wheels are perfect. But there are also a large number who will never go off road and tubes are nothing short of a liability. Each to there own. But the fault, the root cause of all this is a bad decision by Honda. It will be interesting to see if this decision is changed on the 2020 1100cc bike.



My own decision was very simple and hardly painful at all. I had budgeted to pay full price for the bike, but when the moment came I was offered a very nice discount and that cash saved meant the new wheels cost about £600. Money I had put aside for panniers. They can wait... I'm in no rush.



The wheels weren't the only bad decision for the bike. The stupid 2a powersocket is a waste of time. I'm unlikely to ever use it. Instead I shall be installing a 15a socket in the next few weeks. A tool box that requires a hex key. A storage compartment that isn't "easy open" air filters that are a pain and valves and plugs that are an expensive nightmare to check/replace. But despite all that, these bikes are fantastic.. We all do what we think is right for ourselves, to suit our own needs.
Yep, definitely a "to each their own" thing...kinda like oil choice.

Sent from my KYOCERA-E6560 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Like I always say you can put a tube on a tubeless wheel. You can't go the other way around. A tubeless tire makes so much sens without any compromise but a slightly higher price. Then again, there's a few bikes in this price range that do have great tubeless wheels. Tube tires are great, until you roll over a nail, don't have a center stand and are stuck in 35C mosquito infested area :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Just had my rear tire punctured by a rock. Thankfully I was just 20km from home and was able to ride back home on the flat tire (specially with the covid situation, it limits your options to get help). I relooked at the different options and considering I could only find positive reviews around the latest Alpina rims, I took that route. The Kineo is still clearly the best and most simple option, but even the Alpina almost look like a bargain compared to the Kineo, I had to set my limit somewhere.

In over 300000km this is my 3rd or 4th flat tire, but peace of mind has a price, specially when I ride with my gf onboard. Had we been 4-500km from home on a Sunday, none of the options would have been great. WIth a small repair kit and tubeless tires, 5 minutes and you're back on the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
And I asked King-Wheels for Alpina if they had any issues with air leaks and here was the reply:

-------------------------------------------------------------
Hello

With the older style nipples we had some issues if solvent cleaners was used on the rims or pressure washing too close as this can force grit down and can damage the orings

Less than 4% suffered from issues

The new style Alpinas use forged rims and now have double orings to seal the rims rather than one ( sts2)

We have not had one air leak issue and do not anticipate any problems , but still do not recommend using solvent cleaners or pressure washers too close to the nipples

Hot soapy water is sufficient
-------------------------------------------------------------
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
787 Posts
About 15k miles on mine now And still happy. TBH, they lose a couple of psi over the winter layup, but then my summer car does the same so I don’t have any concerns. It also must be pointed out that AFAIK, the O rings Alpina use aren’t O rings per say....they are elastomer rings, so more durable than ordinary O rings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
About 15k miles on mine now And still happy. TBH, they lose a couple of psi over the winter layup, but then my summer car does the same so I don’t have any concerns. It also must be pointed out that AFAIK, the O rings Alpina use aren’t O rings per say....they are elastomer rings, so more durable than ordinary O rings.
And are yours the STS or STS2 with forged aluminum?
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top