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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone

While at the Honda dealer for a service, in the showroom I kept being drawn to one of the most underrated motorcycles, the Honda VFR1200X Crosstourer. I don't go off-road and the V4 engine and shaft drive somehow appeal to me. As Honda have stopped production, there are some offers of a lot of motorcycle for what seems like not a lot of money. I know they are a tourer, heavy and a bit dated in specification. Having said all this I'm still thinking should I or shouldn't I. The quality of the bike seems first class. Without knowing how must experience of this VFR1200X bike exists on this forum, I decided to ask the great and good among you for an opinion if you have such experience. I know the AT and VFR are different tools for different job and I'm probably being mesmerised by the V4 and shaft drive.

Any comments much appreciated, apologies for being a tart and even thinking of divorce.
 

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Heavy/Weight....appears to be the downside of them. A friend has one and loves it. I went from a GSA to the AT and like the feeling of lightness. I'm not sure I could go back to that much weight and I'm over the need to have a shaft drive after 17k miles with the AT. The odd 5 minutes every now and then on chain adjusting/maintenance would have me looking at the Cross Runner over the Cross Tourer. Belting V4 but for me, a more manageable package.
 

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My brother has a VFR1200X DCT and when we ride together we sometimes swap bikes. We both like my 2018 ATAS more because it feels much lighter and rides better. The reason he didn't look at the Africa Twin before was because it was chain drive and had tube tires. After riding it, none of that mattered anymore, lol. He's probably going to get an AT in the near future, and probably a manual version like mine.
 

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I have it in the back of my head that if I moved away from the Africa Twin that I would have a look at the VFR1200X. But my wife and I were eyeballing one at a recent stop on a ride and the owner was telling us be was thinking about getting an Africa Twin. Sometimes I think it's just that desire for something new that has us eyeballing something else.

The 631lb curb weight makes the VFR1200X a bit of a heavy beast, though. Which is why I also have looked at the BMW S 1000 XR.

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the great comments guys, all of which makes sense.

One downside of the Crosstourer is the valve adjustment job for the front cylinders requires throttle body removal along with all the ton of other stuff. The BMW S1000 is the same and is quite a DIY job. While technicians say the 16k valve check interval rarely requires adjustment and you could comfortably do it at 32k, this makes valve adjustment on the AT a relative doddle.

This is all helping my brain get my heart under control.
 

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My buddy has one a really likes it. He does long distance rallies, typically on his BMW K1600 and is a mid-pack finisher in the IBR. He got the VFR for rallies which have hard to reach points due to terrain that his K1600 can’t accomplish. We have ridden together extensively off road in the sand and trails of NW FL and the bike is more capable off road then many people may think. He has a 2017 DCT and we have also logged multiple day trips all on-road. The only thing he can’t stand is the seat, he is going to swap it out for a Day-Long. As stated, not as nimble or light off-road as an AT, but an AT is not as light or nimble as many other adventure bikes, so it comes down to purpose...and you’re right, he got an awesome deal on the bike which is why he purchased it.
 

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A good friend of mine has a Crosstourer 1200 manual and we have done a number of long trips together, the last one being this time last year in Austria, Slovenia and Croatia. I have ridden his bike many times and he has ridden my CRF1000 (which is also manual). He does not go offroad at all and he values the engine torque/power, shaft drive and tubeless tires but he complains that the bike is (top-)heavy. I find the engine awesome, the midrange shove of torque is addictive but do not like the feel of the shaft drive in lower gears/speeds and I also find it top-heavy.

For somebody who does not go off tarmac at all, it is a viable option, especially if you find the CRF1000/1000 slightly underpowered.

PS Ray, I wouldn't worry about the valve service, it can be safely left to 32K miles and I would be surprised if, even then, any valve was found out of spec.
 

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For somebody who does not go off tarmac at all, it is a viable option, especially if you find the CRF1000/1000 slightly underpowered.
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Ah well. At least the slightly underpowered CRF1000 will get better average fuel economy (4.5 vs. 5.9 L/100 kms).
 

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You should probably buy it, keep the AT too, then after a couple years come back and tell us about it🙂

You gotta have more than one bike.
 

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You should probably buy it, keep the AT too, then after a couple years come back and tell us about it🙂

You gotta have more than one bike.
And they all said "AMEN!"
 
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