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Discussion Starter #1
So I apologize up front as some may consider this a dumb question, but I have the opportunity to buy either a standard 2019 DCT or a 2018 Adventure Sport manual (within $300 of each other). I am racking my brain to decide, but wondered if anyone here could offer some fresh perspective. I plan on test riding both in the next few days, and that may help me decide. But in the end, I have been riding for about 4 years and have no issue with a manual transmission.
My situation is that I'm getting both bikes for around the same price. So either is a good deal.
Even if I like the DCT better, I'm stuck with the fact that I can get all of the extras I get with the Adv Sport (bigger tank, heated grips, 12v adapter, bigger screen, crash bars, etc.) for about the same price as the standard DCT.
So here's my dilemma:

Argument for buying the Adv Sport:
If I buy the DCT, I would add crash bars and 12v adapter almost right away, adding about $1,000 to the price. So at this point the Adv sport is a much better deal. Especially considering the better windscreen, and heated grips which I would also eventually add to the DCT.

Argument for the standard DCT:
I can eventually add all of the things to the DCT that are on the Adv. sport (except the bigger gas tank), but I can never add the DCT transmission to the Adventure Sport.

I failed to mention that there are no Adv sport DCTs on sale in my area, which would make my choice much easier. :)

So in the end, is it worth getting the the DCT and building up the add-ons over time, or getting the Adv Sport which already has most of what I would add to it, and live with the manual transmission?
Is the DCT so good that it's worth forgoing the better deal of the Adv. Sport.
BTW, the 2019 DCT = $11,600 the 2018 Adv Sport = $11,900.

Sooooooo confused....
 

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Opinions vary by large degree here. For me personally, I see no advantages to dct unless I was living in a city, commuting, sitting in traffic.

While I appreciate the appeal of the dct and for the technology, it runs contrary to what I want out of motorcycling. I'm a big fan of the zen associated with having my 2 hands and 2 feet employed. I like the added control of the clutch.... I do seek more off road situations, and there are several guys that will talk about the advantages here of dct, it's just not something that appeals to me in any way. I'm definitely glad we have choices, if the AT was only offered in dct, I would not own one.
 

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I have a standard AT with DCT. Of the two you mention, I'd go for the ATAS for the same reasons you quote...range, crash bars etc. But for you...test them both and see which one lights your fire
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Opinions vary by large degree here. For me personally, I see no advantages to dct unless I was living in a city, commuting, sitting in traffic.

While I appreciate the appeal of the dct and for the technology, it runs contrary to what I want out of motorcycling. I'm a big fan of the zen associated with having my 2 hands and 2 feet employed. I like the added control of the clutch.... I do seek more off road situations, and there are several guys that will talk about the advantages here of dct, it's just not something that appeals to me in any way. I'm definitely glad we have choices, if the AT was only offered in dct, I would not own one.

That's a valid point. I'm totally happy with a manual transmission, so I don't see a real need for DCT either. But don't want to regret not picking the DCT down the road. But also don't want to regret missing out on the extra "stuff" that comes with the Adv Sport. I'm 6'1 so the size difference of the two bikes is not an issue either. I do ride mostly in the city right now, but plan on more long trips with maybe 15%-20% "light" off road.

When I had a Vulcan 900, the gearing made it so i had to shift often on the twisties. My current bike, Yamaha Fz8 has a wider rev band and I can pretty much leave it in 3rd on back roads. So I'm not constantly shifting gears on it. From what I read, the AFT has a pretty decent rev band with low end torque, so I don't feel that I would have to constantly change gears on it like I did with the Vulcan if I were to get the manual gear box.
 

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I had a similar choice to make when I purchased my 2019 Std. DCT vs a ATAS back last November. In my case the ATAS was sold before I had the chance to buy it so I ended up with the DCT. i am quite happy with the DCT and am now glad I got it. You really don't know how nice the DCT is until you ride one for a while. It makes riding it so much less intrusive to your riding and I can totally concentrate on my riding skills without having part of my brain occupied with shifting etc. while on really twisty roads. I find the DCT really fun and adding a new dimension to my riding that I have not experienced before. I had made all the same arguments about being comfortable with shifting and feeling more in control etc. but I found out I was wrong about all that after owning my DCT. I also found I like the lower seat height and the standard suspension is still very good off road and more capable than I need at my age and riding level. I also have heard about all the fuel tank problems with the ATAS and I am glad I dodged that bullet. The ATAS crash guards are not that robust so I would probably end up replacing them anyway as well as the skid plate. I added heated grips at a reasonable cost so that is not a big issue. The fuel range is less than the ATAS but I am consistently getting 45-48 US MPG so a 220 mile range works just fine for me. So far I could not be happier with my DCT. Just my .02.

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Dan. The more I think about it, the more I veer towards the DCT. I don't have a lot of experience with motorcycle parts, but the general rules of the universe state that OEM parts are never as good as "most" after-market parts. So I would likely replace the crash bars anyway (an possibly the heated grips). The tank size is not a factor for me, so not worried about that part.
It's good to hear about someone that was in my situation and was happy with their outcome. I honestly think I'd be happy going either way here. The AFT is a great bike. But I have been cursed with the trait of over analyzing every big decision I make. In the end, I may just have to flip a coin. :)
 

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All replies are good here. I can add from personal experience, the higher optioned bike has a higher resale value.
I can honestly say I liked the color scheme better on the ATAS DCT. (2018) Scoured the 'net for a great price and used the printed ad as a bargaining tool.
Now that I've ridden it for a while I'm completely happy with the DCT. Learning curve and all. One more bit: I've been riding for over 50 years, about all types. Dirt, Street, and Track, RR and MX
Been there done that, old codger.
 

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I will say this; my 18 ATAS is a pain to run at slow speed (slower than walking). But that aside, after you learn all the nuances of the DCT it’s one ****-of-a-ride..
 

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I rented both a standard and a DCT last year when I was trying to make up my mind. The one thing that pushed me to the standard shift was how it felt in the twisties. If you like to ride twisty roads hard, I recommend the standard much more. I just never felt I had the best control of gearing on the DCT even when using the thumb shifter. Maybe I would have gotten used to it after a while, but I really liked the normal feel of shifting with a clutch and foot pedal when really getting on it in the twisties. For off-road riding, I can see where the DCT perhaps makes things a bit easier in that you don't have to coordinate as much, but I don't do much off-road.
 

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My wife has had an Africa Twin DCT for over a year here in Mexico, it replaced her BMW F800GS. Yesterday, because she is out of town so she couldn't say no, I rode it for about 250 miles on road surfaces from rough cobblestones, to dirt to twisty secondary roads to interstate-type surfaces at 90MPH+ Previously I had only ridden it around the block and told her I didn't care for the DCT.

Well, that ride totally changed my view. Took me about 20 minutes to quit looking for the clutch lever and after that I loved it! When I start looking for my next (or 'another') motorcycle - I'll be seriously looking at an Africa Twin DCT! :)
 

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I will say this; my 18 ATAS is a pain to run at slow speed (slower than walking). But that aside, after you learn all the nuances of the DCT it’s one ****-of-a-ride..
I've heard this before but my 2019 DCT is not like this at all. I can plunk along like a trials bike even without using the rear brake. I was stuck in traffic this last weekend and was able to putt along at a very slow creep without any issues at all - nice and smooth clutch engagement.
 

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Maybe I would have gotten used to it after a while, but I really liked the normal feel of shifting with a clutch and foot pedal when really getting on it in the twisties.
I really do think you would find you get used to it. I found it a bit odd at first myself, because I kept having to think about using the paddle shifters at first. But repetition builds muscle memory and eventually it becomes as second nature as the foot pedal and clutch. You stop thinking and just do.

My wife has had an Africa Twin DCT for over a year here in Mexico, it replaced her BMW F800GS.
My wife also traded her F800GS in on an Africa Twin after having ridden mine a couple of times :)


Sent from my SM-N975U1 using Tapatalk
 

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To start, welcome to the Forum JAWS50.

= = =

What a great problem to have, eh?

Try both the standard and DCT and decide. As others mentioned already, the OEM crash protection is substandard compared to many aftermarket offerings. I have the AltRider offering (lower assembly) and love it. I use heated riding gloves because I personally find heated grips ineffective for my hands. I actually need heat on top of my hands and around the finger tips, not in the palm. Gloves (lithium battery) provide a solution that works for me and I can take them anywhere. I am thinking about a 12V socket, but so far I have not added one yet. A portable pocket lithium USB battery pack seems to do the trick for my rides.

A final warning: Once you go DCT, you may never go back.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
What a great problem to have, eh?

Try both the standard and DCT and decide. As others mentioned already, the OEM crash protection is substandard compared to many aftermarket offerings. I have the AltRider offering (lower assembly) and love it. I use heated riding gloves because I personally find heated grips ineffective for my hands. I actually need heat on top of my hands and around the finger tips, not in the palm. Gloves (lithium battery) provide a solution that works for me and I can take them anywhere. I am thinking about a 12V socket, but so far I have not added one yet. A portable pocket lithium USB battery pack seems to do the trick for my rides.

A final warning: Once you go DCT, you may never go back.
Thank you for the welcome and as you said, this is a great problem to have. The more I read, the more I lean towards the DCT. I do wonder if I'll miss having the bigger ATAS, but in the end, either bike is a great bike. If I lived out in Montana, I might need the extra range of the ATAS tank, but here in Ohio, I think the standard tank's range will do fine for me. I have a heated jacked that I love, but heated gloves sound wonderful. I have a connection port to add some to my jacket so that may be my next purchase, other than crash bars. Now I just have to go down the rabbit hole of researching and deciding which crash bars to get. I'm currently deciding between Touratech and Altrider. There are plenty of discussions in this forum on crash bars that are very helpful.

By this weekend I hope to not just be a forum member, but a proud owner of a new AT. :cool:
 

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Re the idle
I've heard this before but my 2019 DCT is not like this at all. I can plunk along like a trials bike even without using the rear brake. I was stuck in traffic this last weekend and was able to putt along at a very slow creep without any issues at all - nice and smooth clutch engagement.
I feel a little foolish commenting on any of this after only one (250 mile) ride on s bike that isn't mine but I found the same to be true on my wife's AT DCT. I could go as slow as it was possible for me to keep the bike upright and it was smooth and easy with no stuttering/hesitation/lurching whatsoever. Frankly, I went out on her bike pretty much determined to do so with the intent of telling other friends I ride with why DCT sucks! I came back a convert!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Re the idle


I feel a little foolish commenting on any of this after only one (250 mile) ride on s bike that isn't mine but I found the same to be true on my wife's AT DCT. I could go as slow as it was possible for me to keep the bike upright and it was smooth and easy with no stuttering/hesitation/lurching whatsoever. Frankly, I went out on her bike pretty much determined to do so with the intent of telling other friends I ride with why DCT sucks! I came back a convert!
The fact that you set out to prove it sucks, and came back a convert, says a lot about the AT DCT. It also says a lot about you as a person who is open minded enough to consider other possibilities and admit when you're wrong.
 

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I went for DCT because a really good specific deal was available although did not mind manual bikes either. As others said, now I found difficult to consider ever going back to manual, it is so good!
 
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