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Discussion Starter #1
I know it won't be as long-legged on the slab, but just wondering if anyone has done it, and how it feels off-road?
 

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Interested as well be keen to shorten the ratios occasionally find myself needing to be between gears.
 

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Just got the 15 tooth Superlite in the mail today. Now just need the bike to get here so I can install it. They also have a 14 tooth, shop around for them, they are less on the web than on the Tourtech site.

There was another recent thread on this where a rider had changed to the 15 tooth and noticed an off road improvement without significantly altering his road performance.
 

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Yup I've done it. Mixed results..

Good: 1st gear is super low and makes navigating technical stuff less "clutchy".

Bad: You change gear more, 1st gear is good for about 4 feet if you're are taking off. Furthermore, the speedo inaccuracy is massive. I need to hit an indicated 121 kph in order to actually do 100 kph according to my GPS. It's actually a real pain to have to mentally adjust for the speedo all the time. There is always the speedo healer but it's pricey and worse, a giant pain to install.

I swapped back to my 16 tooth front sprocket today. The bike seems happier with this setup and certainly has enough torque to make it work. I don't mind using a little more clutch now and then if it means a working speedo and a more relaxed riding experience. I think the engineers at Honda got it right.
 

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Many many years ago a friend and I swopped the rear sprocket of our very similar 500/550 Hondas. I can't remember the difference in sprocket sizes, but it was small, 2 or 3 teeth. The 500 revved so high, it was painful to ride and the 550 became so lame almost bordering on useless, slow , no decent top speed and heavy on fuel. Needless to say we changed it back to original.

As my father in law always said " you never change only one thing "


As said above " I think the engineers at Honda got it right."
 

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Yup I've done it. Mixed results..

Good: 1st gear is super low and makes navigating technical stuff a lot less "clutchy".

Bad: You change gear more, 1st gear is good for about 4 feet if you're are taking off. The speedo inaccuracy is massive. I need to hit an indicated 121 kph in order to actually do 100 kph according to my GPS. It's actually a real pain to have to mentally adjust for the speedo all the time. There is always the speedo healer but it's pricey and worse, a giant pain to install.

I swapped back to my 16 tooth front sprocket today. The bike seems happier with this setup and certainly has enough torque to make it work. I don't mind using a little more clutch now and then if it means a working speedo and a more relaxed riding experience. I think the engineers at Honda got it right.
Did you go 14 tooth or 15?
 

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I'd rather change the size of the rear sprocket, don't know why. I did that with my Versys 650 and the best bit was it made the speedo dead accurate. It maybe wouldn't be a bad idea if it helped the AT's inaccurate speedo.
 

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I'd rather change the size of the rear sprocket, don't know why. I did that with my Versys 650 and the best bit was it made the speedo dead accurate. It maybe wouldn't be a bad idea if it helped the AT's inaccurate speedo.
The only problem with that, is that like the V-strom the AT has a "optimistic" speedo lol, so I believe you have to up a tooth right? I'm thinking if you change the rear sprocket by a tooth the effects would not be as dramatic as the front sprocket since it is much bigger to begin with. not too mention it is a whole lot easier!
 

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I'd rather change the size of the rear sprocket, don't know why. I did that with my Versys 650 and the best bit was it made the speedo dead accurate. It maybe wouldn't be a bad idea if it helped the AT's inaccurate speedo.
On the US bikes the speedometer is dead on.
 

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My UK bike is exactly 10% optimistic... why so much ? , the temp is also about 2 degrees C high... again... Why ? Perhaps 17 bikes are more accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
1 tooth in the front is generally worth two in the back.

Going two teeth in the front has gotta be way too much.

Benjah: did you go with a 14 or 15?
 

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This is not true, on mine at 80 MPH indicated on bike My GPS says 72 MPH. It may be true for your bike but unfortunately mine is inaccurate. :(
Hmm, mine is within one mph of my Zumo 665 and I have read other US bikes reported to be the same.
I wonder why yours would be different? I'm still on stock tires are you?
 

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The 15 tooth on front changes the ratio 6.7%, speedometer changes by same amount. You'd have to go up 3 teeth on rear and then the chain probably would require a link to work. I like the lower ratio, I've hit 105 mph and not hitting rev limiter, so it's got plenty on top and runs over 30 mph in 1st gear, so for me, it's better. I prefer to save my clutch. This is for a manual.
 

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Hmm, mine is within one mph of my Zumo 665 and I have read other US bikes reported to be the same.
I wonder why yours would be different? I'm still on stock tires are you?
Wild, hmmm. I am not on stock tires now, but I took the speed measurement with stock tires. I was using the GPS on my phone so maybe thats innacurate? If my speedo is correct then I have been speeding around quite a bit :p
 

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A change from 16 to 15 in rear sprocket makes the final ratio 6.7% shorter while a change from 42 to 43 in the back makes it only 2.4% shorter. It may be worth doing the latter as I find the 6th rather tall (did the same thing with the rear sprocket in my VFR VTEC and transformed the bike) but the speedo will be 2.4% more optimistic - and it is already quite optimistic in European bikes.. :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #20
For the expense, and ease, I'd way rather try swapping the front first.

It's barely even a half hour job to do that.

I'm gonna try it.

I ride a manual and setting up for off road.
 
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