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It was recommend by one of the guys at the shop to not use a motorcycle hitch hauler (600lb) for my new 2020 African Twin Adventure Sport. I am going to haul it on long road trips and would prefer to not pull a trailer. I have a camper topper on the truck. current hitch is 2.5 in receiver and rated for 15000 lbs / 1500 hitch weight.
 

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It was recommend by one of the guys at the shop to not use a motorcycle hitch hauler (600lb) for my new 2020 African Twin Adventure Sport. I am going to haul it on long road trips and would prefer to not pull a trailer. I have a camper topper on the truck. current hitch is 2.5 in receiver and rated for 15000 lbs / 1500 hitch weight.
Hey Dan Reed,
I answered your PM so, again, if you need further answers, please feel free to ask.
Scott
 
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Hey Dan Reed,
I answered your PM so, again, if you need further answers, please feel free to ask.
Scott
Hi FIRE UP, I can remember your thread. How did that work out for you. I have a Versa Haul and have considered throwing the AT on it. Did it hold up? I would have to reinforce my vehicle hitch, it is only rated for 500lbs tongue weight.
 

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Hi FIRE UP, I can remember your thread. How did that work out for you. I have a Versa Haul and have considered throwing the AT on it. Did it hold up? I would have to reinforce my vehicle hitch, it is only rated for 500lbs tongue weight.
Well Two60z,
So far, we've carried that A/T on the Versa Haul about 2,500 miles or so, on the back of the motorhome and, it's worked flawlessly. But, I did do quite a bit of augmentation to the weight carrying capability of the Versa Haul. The hitch on our motorhome is rated at 10,000 lbs. with a tongue weight capacity of 1,000 lbs. Now, the Versa Haul's weight carrying capacity is either 500# or, 600#, depending on which model you have. By the way, the primary difference between the two models of Versa Haul and their respective weight carrying capabilities is the fact that, the tire tray on the 600 # unit is longer than the 500# model. It's the same unit, primarily.

Anyway, since the weight of the A/T (A/S DCT version) hovers right close to 540#, that would be taxing the Versa Hauler (that I have) by a bit. So, my answer to it was to add TWO more receivers. Long story short, I welded the two receivers onto some 1/2" thick, 4" x 6" angle iron and bolted them to the bottom side of the rear of my motorhome frame, right where the factory hitch is bolted. Then, I fabricated two, 2" x 2" x 36" x 3/16" wall tubing, , to be used as extensions inside those two new receivers. And, those two extensions are bent to a precise set of angles in such that, they support the bottom side, of each end, of the Versa Haul. They don't take ALL the weight, just 1/3 each.

Then I set each one (the extensions) so they're actually bolted to the Versa Haul. The main reason I did it that way is because, if I'd have welded those extensions to the Versa Haul, it would be IMPOSSIBLE to fit all three 2" tubing sections, into all three receivers at one time. I can do precise work but, that's TOO precise. It's just way easier to slide each extension into its respective receiver and then, bolt it to the Versa Haul.

Then, when all that was done, I knew that the A/T is one SERIOUS top heavy bike. And, trying to guide it up the ramp of the Versa Hauler, then, walk it along the tire tray 'till it hits the stop on the other end, WHILE STANDING ON THE GROUND, is about as DANGEROUS as it gets. So, I created a form of scaffolding to walk on and, walk that AT right up and along the tire tray. WAAAAAY SAFER! Once the A/T has the two front tie downs on it which, the wife takes care of, I step down and, finish tying the bike down. Once that's done, the scaffolding is dissasembled and both it and the supports for it, are stored in a compartment. The whole process of setting up the ramp and the scaffolding, then loading the bike and completely tying it down, takes me about 10 minutes or so.

Then, we hook up the Jeep to the receiver that the Versa Haul has and, we're off and running. Hope this helps some.
Scott
 

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Let the future tell the truth, and evaluate each one according to his work and accomplishments. The present is theirs; the future, for which I have really worked, is mine.

Nikola Tesla

That is Slick

Well Sir, I'm no poet or theorist so, I suppose that Tesla quote means something, just not sure what.
Scott
Seems some robot translator moved my reply to a different thread. Your Versa Haul / AT has a bright future. Nice Rig.
 

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I know this post is a year old, but I found it on a search and going to resurrect.....

Here's our situation.....

Wife and I ride a 2017 DCT that will tip the scales right at 550lbs with the goodies. We also just purchased a Class C with the Ford Chassis with the new V8 Godzilla engine that pulls like a draft horse. The receiver on the rear I-beams has a 750lb rating.

I am considering this guy... as it has a 600lb rating.

Any thoughts or experience to share?

 

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Well Big_John,
Here's my opinion, for whatever it's worth. It's really hard to tell the kind of quality of that unit, from an Amazon ad. Based on what I see, I myself would shy away. I say this because I have built my own haulers and, I've also purchased commercially made ones. The Versa Haul unit is what I'm presently using. If you red my previous posts, you see that, while the Versa Haul is capable 500#, and it most likely could handle that A/T's weight, I'm one of those that simply does not want any issues down the road, so to speak.

I've been a fabricator as well as a fireman for decades and decades. So, to help this Versa Haul sustain the weight, I installed two more receivers. I then added the tubing from those receivers to the bottom side of the Versa Haul. Everything at that point, bolts together. I put it all loosely together, then go around and tighten everything up. This entire process takes me about 10 minutes or so. No biggie.

Now, here's something for you to REALLY consider. The A/T IS, as you say, around 550# or so. And, it's a fairly top-heavy bike. So, loading and off loading that bike, onto and off that rack, can be a very, very dangerous and ergonomically awkward affair. You CERTAINLY don't want that big beast to start to topple over as you're either going up the ramp, down the ramp or, even on the tray. I certainly don't. Sooooo, what I did was create a temporary Scaffolding for that part of the operation. The two tubes that are used to augment the weight carrying of the A/T from the additional receivers, are just under 2" x 2" inside.

That means I can get some 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" tubing, to stick in those holes, and lay a Harbor Freight 9" x 72" tray/ramp on top of those added tubes. I also use a second HF ramp as a ramp for me to WALK ON as I'm loading the bike.

Here's how it works. The Versa Haul is on and tightened down securely. I break out the extra 1 1/2" tubes and slide them into the openings of the tubes that come from the receivers. I then lay one of the HF ramps on those tubes and secure them in place with two long pins. I then add the second HF ramp to the end of the other one. Now, I've already pre-aligned the bike for the Versa Haul ramp. I start the bike and, put it in D mode.

As I very gently apply throttle, that A/T starts up the Versa Haul ramp. At the very same time, I start walking up the HF ramp, alongside the A/T. Still applying throttle, the bike slowly continues up the Versa Haul ramp and I too, am still walking along side it. The bike levels out on the tray, up against the tire chock on the other end. I am at this time, finishing up walking on my scaffolding. I then lock the parking brake, and put the bike into NEUTRAL and shut off the key.

At that time, the wife is already setting up tie-downs for the front end of the bike. Once she's done, the bike is stable enough for me to let go, and jump off my scaffolding. I then apply more tie downs in other tactical positions. Once the bike is tied down securely, I then un-secure my scaffolding and, remove it and place it in one of my side compartments in the motorhome. I do the same with the other HF ramp that I walk up on, while the bike is powering itself up the VersaHaul ramp. I remove the temp tubes too, and place them in the same compartment.

Once that's all done, I hook up our Jeep to the tow bar that's attached to the receiver that's built into the Versa Haul. And, we're off for a good time.

Now, this is what I do for my operation. How you decide to load and unload your A/T, is up to you, THEY'RE HEAVY! I have only ONE BODY and, I'm not gonna destroy it trying to counter a falling A/T while loading or unloading. The temp scaffolding was my only answer to this dilemma. It works for me.

Incedentally, the "Godzilla V-8" in your new Class C motorhome, is not a V-8. It's Fords 420 Cu. In V-10 that's 330HP for the Class C's. For a class A on a Ford F-53 Chassis, it's the same engine only, it's a 365 HP version. And, unless construction techniques have changed in the last few years, you don't have "I-beam" frame members. You have C-channel frame ends. Not that any of that is a big deal. But, I would definitely consider the addition of a couple of more receivers to really stabilize that rack/carrier. The A/T will rock all over the place with only the one receiver, even if a hitch tightener is used which, I highly recommend. Any questions, you can PM me or, ask on here in case others are thinking of the same approach. If you click on my pics above, you'll see the scaffolding and walk-up ramp that is temporarily in place, for loading and un loading the A/T.
Scott
 

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Well Big_John,
Here's my opinion, for whatever it's worth. It's really hard to tell the kind of quality of that unit, from an Amazon ad. Based on what I see, I myself would shy away...
Scott
sounds all very wise what Fire Up says here and in the post where he shows its rig and all the work he did to make it work. Very nice motorhome by the way.
The Amazon hitch may work for a 250cc motocross but I don't think it would be safe for an AT beast on a trip furthermore than a few blocks.
 

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I didn't find the carrier on Amazon, I searched for "Best Motorcycle Carrier" and it won two different 'shoot outs' in the elite category. Guys that have purchased it claim it is built like a beast.

Now with that said, I completely hear everything you all are saying. When I haul bikes now, I load them up steep ramps in the back of my 4x4 Ram. In ten years, I have dropped one bike, one single time and that was enough to know to be smart and safe. 500-600lb bikes certainly have my respect, especially my 640lb VFR1200X. Tilting 6" one way or the other, means that bike is on the ground.

I have had a 400lb carrier for the last 6 years and never hauled a bike heavier than a 350lb Honda XR650R on it, but it has always done the job nicely.

I do like the idea of two additional beams, extending from the chassis I-beams and will probably do that. Excellent suggestion. I am an amateur fabricator, but I do have a MIG and can do all my own work.
 

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Beware of advertised weights. I can't vouch for the accuracy of my scales, but I weighed my 2017 DCT with Outback Mototrek pannier racks (no bags), full Altrider engine guards, a small tool box, and a cheap top box, and it was like 610 pounds. Can't recall how much fuel was in it. I'd like to get a loading ramp that wasn't several hundred bucks, but the cutoff is usually around 600 pounds. Might be OK, might not.
 

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I have a trailer, a hitch mount and a ramp for loading Ol' Red onto or into the back on my F150. The trailer is very capable, but a pain to deal with more so than the hitch mount. Both while driving and storage. My hitch mount will carry 600 lbs which easily supports the AT without bags. It goes on the truck easily and when installed correctly is very stable.




Regarding loading, the trailer is the easiest to manage single-handedly. The hitch mount is the next easiest, followed by loading into the back of the truck which requires 2 people to be done safely.
 

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Yeah... after thinking on this for a couple of days..... I am NOT pulling the trigger. I think the AT is just too close in weight to those 600lb carriers and I don't want to see my bike, spread in pieces across the interstate.

For now, we will just carry it in our 14' cargo trailer.
 

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Yeah... after thinking on this for a couple of days..... I am NOT pulling the trigger. I think the AT is just too close in weight to those 600lb carriers and I don't want to see my bike, spread in pieces across the interstate.

For now, we will just carry it in our 14' cargo trailer.
Well Sir,
That's a good decision. Everyone's got to work within their limits of what's safe, and what's not. There are very few gents who would go through what I have, by adding twin receivers to augment the weight carrying capability of a single receiver. As has been shown on here and other places, a few manufacturers of single receiver hitch mount carriers. And, they claim to be "stable". Well, their version of stable, and mine, are usually, quite different.

Even with the use of a Hitch tightener, a single receiver hitch mount, will still sway or wobble with a heavier bike on it. It's inevitable. I know, I've done it all. I've built my own hitch tighteners simply because, any commercially produced ones, can't hold a candle to what's needed for real stability. I'm one of those that over builds because, want my bike to still be there, after riding on a rack , on our coach, on Americas less than quality roads, freeways and highways.

Due to the logistics of how we travel and what we desire at a given destination, a trailer is out of the question. Soooo, we use the Versa Haul, and tow our Jeep. Or, we use a Rampage lift/carrier and tow our GMC Sierra 1500 Extended Cab 4x4. It all depends on which bike I or we want and, what kind of riding is to be done at either one, or multiple destinations. The Rampage, if you've (or anyone reading this) is not aware of it, is a simple but, very capable winch powered lift/carrier that mounts in the back of a truck (or, with a little engineuity, across the back of a motorhome).

I usually use it for hauling my '08 GL1800 Goldwing but, that got traded in for my present AT/AS/DCT. And, it also loads and carries our '15 BMW K1600 GTL-Exclusive (right close to 800+ lbs). It's a very, very secure and ultra stable system. Again, it all depends on what we want for riding, when we arrive.
Scott
 

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Here's the Rampage:
 

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A couple more:
 

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