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Yes, it’s all true. Well, it kind of depends on your bike. Some motorcycles with great big flywheels and big gears, like many Harleys and some BMW Boxers, need the clutch – or at least a little clutch – for nearly every shift. Most sportbikes only need you to use the clutch to pull away from stops and for the shift from first to second gear.

At slow, around-town speeds, we mostly use at least a little clutch to shift anyway; you don’t need to pull the lever all the way in every time you use it. But if you’re steadily accelerating, and especially at WOT (wide open throttle), you’ll find that after second gear, if you roll the throttle closed just enough to unload the driveline, for just a split second, with your toe pressing on the lever, then third gear will slip right in without using the clutch at all. Fourth, 5th and 6th will slip in even easier since the gaps between them are increasingly smaller. Done smoothly, it’s no harder on your gearbox than using the clutch.
Read more about Ask MO Anything: Is Clutchless Shifting Bad For My Transmission? at Motorcycle.com.
 

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Ask MO Anything? ok........

Why is the word for "a fear of long words" hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia so long?
and
What happens when you get 'scared half to death' twice?
 

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The long answer is it depends on many factors. I don't worry about it because I am great at rev matching. I have a manual shift Jetta VR6 and I tend to shift faster than the hydraulically operated clutch can fully disengage. Over the years, I learned how to avoid the clunk.
On a motorcycle engine, it is less likely to cause damage because of the constant mesh design but you can potentially break one of your dogs if you get it really wrong on a powerful bike.
Whoever that was that says you need clutch on a Harley doesn't know what they're talking about. It is even less critical because the belt drive provides shock damping in the driveline.
Having said that, just a little clutch helps smooth things out and can be done just as quickly. In fact, I can shift just as fast as a DCT on a motorcycle and in a VW Type R.
 
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