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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Say I want to sell my 2017 Honda Africa Twin. I list it at $10,000 because I paid over $11,000 for it three years ago and I have a couple thousand worth of accessories I have added.

It shocks me when I look up in the blue book, to find the trade in value is $6490.

Yes the dealer resale is $9270, but I’m not a dealer. I can’t offer warranty or service, and I don’t want to take the bike back if the customer isn’t satisfied.

So what is the street value? If its half between the Kelly numbers, then its $7880. Hold that thought.

I find used 2017s on the internet from $7000 to $11,000. That gives me hope.

Then I find ads for new old stock 2017 models selling for $8,999 and $9,500. That’s with full warranty and 0 miles.

Well my bike comes with crash bars and skid plate. Plus hard panniers, and foot pegs and a windshield and a top box. That stuff cost me time to research and install, plus many hundreds of dollars. And I should get my money back when I sell, right?

Turns out not so much. A dealer will tell you, they’d rather trade for a clean stock bike with no accessories. They especially frown on any added electrical items or performance parts. The message is, if you think its worth something, take it off and go sell it on ebay.

So what are farkles worth? Crash bars, bash plates, racks or lights that might cost hundreds retail, those might be worth 25% to 50% on the bike or parted out. Likely more parted out, if they are like new.

With bling farkles its even worse. Items like covers for the brake fluid reservoir, or headlight protectors or spiffy risers or levers, yes they cost money. But after all, farkling your bike isn’t an investment strategy, its just an expensive hobby.

Given that disappointing fact, your heavily farlkled bike is worth marginally more that it would be bone stock.

Okay what can I get for my AT?

Compared to $9,000 to $9,500 for a new one, and +/- $7,880 blue book, with a few scuffs and some miles on it, the stock bike must be in the ballpark of $7,500 to $8,000.

For the aftermarket stuff, I really don’t want to pull it off and hassle with selling it, so I guess I’ll go with leaving them on, and selling the bike for whatever deal I can make with the buyer. If I have a couple thousand into farkles, maybe I can ask for a thousand and settle for something less when it comes to those.

Somebody tell me where my thinking is wrong.



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You are correct in what the dealer said, that is, very, very few dealers put value in the accessories. OEM accessories tend to take precedence, but usually for 25 cents on the dollar at best. Gold Wing genuine accessories (on Gold Wings) might do better than that.

Most will say Blue Book is what the shopper will be using as guidance. So be prepared. I typically strip the bike of transferable accessories and use them myself. I seldom sell them off because the return on effort is more often than not worth the time. The rest stays with the bike.

Region and season matters. If your region is low on ATs and there is a lot of season left, your chances improve of getting closer to what you are asking. Finally, mileage and general inspection matters in the offer, of course.
 

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You are correct in what the dealer said, that is, very, very few dealers put value in the accessories. OEM accessories tend to take precedence, but usually for 25 cents on the dollar at best. Gold Wing genuine accessories (on Gold Wings) might do better than that.

Most will say Blue Book is what the shopper will be using as guidance. So be prepared. I typically strip the bike of transferable accessories and use them myself. I seldom sell them off because the return on effort is more often than not worth the time. The rest stays with the bike.

Region and season matters. If your region is low on ATs and there is a lot of season left, your chances improve of getting closer to what you are asking. Finally, mileage and general inspection matters in the offer, of course.
Isn’t the Blue Book value a wholesale price? Retail is what most of us are going tp pay or negotiate on when making a purchase.
 

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Isn’t the Blue Book value a wholesale price? Retail is what most of us are going tp pay or negotiate on when making a purchase.
I was thinking used bike, like what the ministry of transportation would consider when transferring ownership during a private sale.

Nevertheless, the potential buyer will almost always low-ball even the Blue Book estimate.

One of the most popular, and dumbest buyer questions, " ... what is the lowest offer you will accept?" :rolleyes:
 

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While we all like to farkle our bikes to customize them or add functionality to it for our own use. But unfortunately, farkles and accessories are probably one of the worst returns on investment purchases you can make. As DT suggests, resale on them is pennies on the dollar. At best they may add a couple hundred to the resale, but more often they will probably just be something that sways the needle on two similarly priced bikes. In some cases, they can detract from value.

I know you put a lot of time into researching the various pieces, we all do. But we all research what we want and value what we want. We have to realize upon resale that may not be exactly what a prospective buyer wants.

To someone who didn't particularly chose or want the items you added, the value just isn't there in resale. For example, I prefer soft bags and very much disklike top boxes. So even without looking at you have mounted, I know the hard panniers and tail box are of no value to me except maybe the racks and only if they would work with the bags I want. The top box if any modifications were made to body pannels etc., to accommodate mounting it will subtract value from the bike for me. Windscreens are personal, so unless you have one I was already looking to buy, it is also of no value. The crash bars and skid plate are the only two things that might add value to me and that would depend on whether it was something I was looking for already or could live with. Otherwise, I am looking to take them off and buy something else.

The dealer isn't wrong saying that your best resale value is going to be in removing them and find a buyer on eBay, forum classifieds, etc. Who will pay you the most for accessories and farkles, is a buyer that particularly wants those exactly accessories and farkles. Otherwise, it is a sliding scale of value.
 

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One of the most popular, and dumbest buyer questions, " ... what is the lowest offer you will accept?" :rolleyes:
My standard response to that is "What is the highest amount you are willing to offer." If it isn't within the range I had in mind for what I would accept, then I thank them for their interest and we are done :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Isn’t the Blue Book value a wholesale price? Retail is what most of us are going tp pay or negotiate on when making a purchase.
Here's how I understand it.There is not one blue book price, there are two. Go to the Kelley site for a 2017 Honda CRF1000

You see a trade in price at $6,490 and a typical listing price at $9,270. That is a dealer's reference, what he would offer you vs what he would sell it for. So yeah, there's $2,780 profit in the trade for him.

The median is $7,880. As a private party, I think you might expect that to be a reasonable asking price.

What gets me is how many bikes I see for sale with asking prices up to $11,500. Even bikes with mileage on them over 20,000. That seems wacked, when dealers all over the country are advertising NOS (new old stock) 2017s at $9,500 and less. Zero miles, full warranty.

Why would you pay more for a used bike with an expired warranty?



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People are hoping to snatch an uninformed buyer?

Or, a pressure tactic to pump the asking price to help ensure getting the realistic price, or a bit better.

For private sales, I just ask for a fair price with a lower cut-off where I say, " ... thanks for taking a look, but no deal."

These are difficult days to be a seller's market. Just look at the used Harley surplus out there. It is literally a debris field. Hopefully potential buyers still see decent value in the Honda offerings.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
People are hoping to snatch an uninformed buyer?
Yeah. They'd have to be awful clueless to pay $11,500 for a bike with a real market value of maybe $7,500


Or, a pressure tactic to pump the asking price to help ensure getting the realistic price, or a bit better.
I can see asking for an optimistic $9,000 and thinking you'd come down to $7,500.

But asking $11,500, will anyone even call that guy?


These are difficult days to be a seller's market. Just look at the used Harley surplus out there. It is literally a debris field. Hopefully potential buyers still see decent value in the Honda offerings.
Many of us have cancelled our rides or trips this year because of the closures. Maybe that will change in a couple months, but I won't bet on it. Which makes this not the best year to be trying to sell your bike.



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. . .

Many of us have cancelled our rides or trips this year because of the closures. Maybe that will change in a couple months, but I won't bet on it. Which makes this not the best year to be trying to sell your bike.
Yeah, I hear ya. :rolleyes:

I cancelled a rally, which also required a border crossing. Wee bit of a bummer, but not a life show-stopper.
 

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I think there's a bit of luck involved when selling a bike with some bits added....provided you've picked the right bits to add, they'll help sell an Adv bike.
Here in the UK an ad will often have two prices. The bike with everything as is...say £8000, but without the pink brake lever, hugger and leather bar end tassles...£7500....and both being negotiable with an ono or an ovno.
The prevailing market, well put together and honest advert and what the manufacturer are doing with current models also impacts.

Back in 2017, folk in the UK had been buying the ATDCT for about £11.5k in July and August. In September, one dealer started selling brand new ones for £9k with 0% deposit and 0% interest. All of a sudden anyone with a 1 month old 500 mile AT had suddenly lost well over £3k. (KTM do it regularly)

GLWS
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I think there's a bit of luck involved when selling a bike with some bits added....provided you've picked the right bits to add, they'll help sell an Adv bike.
Here in the UK an ad will often have two prices. The bike with everything as is...say £8000, but without the pink brake lever, hugger and leather bar end tassles...£7500....and both being negotiable with an ono or an ovno.
The prevailing market, well put together and honest advert and what the manufacturer are doing with current models also impacts.

Back in 2017, folk in the UK had been buying the ATDCT for about £11.5k in July and August. In September, one dealer started selling brand new ones for £9k with 0% deposit and 0% interest. All of a sudden anyone with a 1 month old 500 mile AT had suddenly lost well over £3k. (KTM do it regularly)

GLWS

What's an ono or an ovno in American speak?

Yeah, dealers discounting the NOS models cripples the resale market for folks trying to get back the money they have into a two or four year old bike.



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