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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
[Hi there,

(If you don’t want to read all the story, here the shortcut for the question: how much better is the std 1100 comparing to the atas 1100 on hard off road? Any real world experience with the atas1100 on this condition?)

During four years I have been riding a crf1000 18 which I just sold. Love the bike but I’m anger to try this new generation. During 4 years I have ridden it mainly off road with a good bunch of enduro-like trails, kind of place where only smaller bikes generally goes. Except for some superficial scars bike has always behaved quite well, with 0 faults. My usage: 40% asphalt, 40% unpaved roads in different conditions and 20% trails with lot of rocks, roots, deep sand etc. Tarmac is just an unavoidable way to get to where I want: dirt roads and single tracks. But I’m in Brazil therefore that means relatively big distances of asphalt to get where really matters. And because of this I have always desired more comfort and a bigger tank for the on road part of the trips. Also the electronic suspension has some appeal.

Which leads to my question: is the atas 2021 manual a good choice for me?I know the standard version is lighter and more nimble. But my question is relative to the atas 1100. Will it handle (real) off road well? Will the rims be as resistant as the non-tubeless one? Is there someone that use the atas 1100 for (real) off road and share their experience? Most of the picture that I see is from people using the atas for touring... thanks a lot!
 

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I have ATAS 2020 manual no ES, and I would say if you truly want to take AT off-road go for the manual standard version. Least weight from the line-up, the cheapest option and the manual clutch won't cause you problems with muscle memory in urgent scenarios.

I think most people buy ATAS for touring and adventuring, not for off-road, and after talking to the dealer, that is what honda is aiming for with their AS models.

Every few kg adds up, and just picking my ATAS off the gravel road is an effort, can't imagine the logistics if you are stuck in the middle of the forest trail, pulling 240kg beast out of a ditch.😄

Tubed tires are a big plus if you're really going to put the bike through it's paces, and I do wonder how much abuse the ES can actually take, that's still a mystery.

I you are really worried about fuel range, just buy a little reserve cannister and put it on the bike.
 

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I would second what @Georgy is saying.
I’ve done a limited amount of off road work on my 2020 ATAS Manual (standard suspension) and I really feel that high up weight of the tank.
If I was buying again with off road riding as the main aim, there’s no question I’d opt for the standard (non AS) bike.
I can’t really comment on the whole tube/no tube question. I’ve never had issues with either 🤞
 

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I ride a similar profile to you, with the added challenge of significant elevation changes, on the '20 1100 AS. I think it fits the bill perfectly. It is much more manageable than the 1000 AS due to lowered ride height and other ergonomics. The weight difference between the non-DCT versions is only 29lbs, so negligible when it comes to getting the bike off the ground, which I've never struggled to do. The bike rides like an oversized Enduro to me and I don't find it a chore to beat the piss out of it in challenging terrain. And when it comes to blasting 800km paved days through the mountains, the AS is an absolute animal. A few buttons at the end of the trail and the suspension stiffens up and is ready to carve canyons with the best of them. The tubeless wheels are a huge bonus as I don't dread flats anymore. The fuel capacity is worth it. Riding with a friend on his '18 base model is a pain in the ass as we have to stop way too often for gas. We once had to ride a 180km detour for gas because of his bike.

There are definitely moments where I wish I was on a 250 instead of an 1100, but never a time when I think that having bought the base model AT would make my situation any easier.

63863
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You´ve made my day. That was exacly the kind of info I was looking for. Thanks a lot. I know by experience that there is a huge gap between what the marketing guys wants us to believe and the real world. They need to categorize their products so they need to choose which attribute which one will have on the ads, reviews etc: One bike for off road, another bike for touring - so it makes easy for the customer to choose. But that´s not necessarily based on the real world. That´s why I was looking for real experience rather than oppinion based on the specs.
I will go for the ATAS ES manual although i guess the std black with red frame is awesome!
I also never had a hard time getting the crf1000 out of the ground. I believe that´s more related to technique and sometimes physical strenght. I also ride a 2018 EXC KTM 300 and i would never take the Africa where i go with the 300 simply because my skill level would not be enough for that!
cheers





I ride a similar profile to you, with the added challenge of significant elevation changes, on the '20 1100 AS. I think it fits the bill perfectly. It is much more manageable than the 1000 AS due to lowered ride height and other ergonomics. The weight difference between the non-DCT versions is only 29lbs, so negligible when it comes to getting the bike off the ground, which I've never struggled to do. The bike rides like an oversized Enduro to me and I don't find it a chore to beat the piss out of it in challenging terrain. And when it comes to blasting 800km paved days through the mountains, the AS is an absolute animal. A few buttons at the end of the trail and the suspension stiffens up and is ready to carve canyons with the best of them. The tubeless wheels are a huge bonus as I don't dread flats anymore. The fuel capacity is worth it. Riding with a friend on his '18 base model is a pain in the ass as we have to stop way too often for gas. We once had to ride a 180km detour for gas because of his bike.

There are definitely moments where I wish I was on a 250 instead of an 1100, but never a time when I think that having bought the base model AT would make my situation any easier.

View attachment 63863
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have ATAS 2020 manual no ES, and I would say if you truly want to take AT off-road go for the manual standard version. Least weight from the line-up, the cheapest option and the manual clutch won't cause you problems with muscle memory in urgent scenarios.

I think most people buy ATAS for touring and adventuring, not for off-road, and after talking to the dealer, that is what honda is aiming for with their AS models.

Every few kg adds up, and just picking my ATAS off the gravel road is an effort, can't imagine the logistics if you are stuck in the middle of the forest trail, pulling 240kg beast out of a ditch.😄

Tubed tires are a big plus if you're really going to put the bike through it's paces, and I do wonder how much abuse the ES can actually take, that's still a mystery.

I you are really worried about fuel range, just buy a little reserve cannister and put it on the bike.
thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I would second what @Georgy is saying.
I’ve done a limited amount of off road work on my 2020 ATAS Manual (standard suspension) and I really feel that high up weight of the tank.
If I was buying again with off road riding as the main aim, there’s no question I’d opt for the standard (non AS) bike.
I can’t really comment on the whole tube/no tube question. I’ve never had issues with either 🤞
thanks a lot Buddy
 

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With this talk of being deep in the outback on a big machine, a lightweight "block and tackle" like an arborist might use for mechanical advantage could be a welcome addition to the tool kit. (Don't cheap out on the pulleys).

I recall riding across some, by all appearances, dry mud near the edge of a drying pond with my XR650L when it broke through that crust of a surface and sank straight to the engine cases. Mind you, I was not loaded down so, presumably, the bike weighed half of what a loaded AT might weigh. It took me 45 minutes to clear myself of that situation which included a lot of dragging the bike sideways inch by inch after I freed the mud's deathgrip on the wheels. I don't want to imagine having to do that with an AT, constantly looking for footing as the mud continued to hold a grip on the bike.
I was only 3' from solid ground.
 

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You´ve made my day. That was exacly the kind of info I was looking for. Thanks a lot. I know by experience that there is a huge gap between what the marketing guys wants us to believe and the real world. They need to categorize their products so they need to choose which attribute which one will have on the ads, reviews etc: One bike for off road, another bike for touring - so it makes easy for the customer to choose. But that´s not necessarily based on the real world. That´s why I was looking for real experience rather than oppinion based on the specs.
I will go for the ATAS ES manual although i guess the std black with red frame is awesome!
I also never had a hard time getting the crf1000 out of the ground. I believe that´s more related to technique and sometimes physical strenght. I also ride a 2018 EXC KTM 300 and i would never take the Africa where i go with the 300 simply because my skill level would not be enough for that!
cheers
I think you may have a bit of confirmation bias here. 2 of the 3 ATAS owners who replied were actually advocating against the ATAS as an off-road choice. Count me in with that group. I ride a 2021 ATAS/ES and while the bike suits my 80% road 20% off-road riding style well, I would never recommend it over the standard AT as an off-road machine. Nobody here is Toni Bou, and you can see even he's riding the Standard AT with manual transmission.

Reasons why I don't recommend the ATAS/ES for considerable off-road (as opposed to dirt road) use:
  • HEAVY, and top-heavy at that. With a full tank of gas the bike has a very narrow balance point.
  • Forgetful. If you drop your bike while off-road (as I have done many times) and you need to power it down to pick it up, you must remember to disable wheelie control, traction control and ABS all over again. If you don't (as I've neglected to do on more than one occasion) you may find yourself stalling out on what is a totally ridable incline only because the electronic rider interventions are kicking in.
  • Electronic. While I love the ability to easily change suspension characteristics with my electronic suspension, I would be concerned about relying on such electronics over many thousands of miles of off-road abuse. Heck, even the TFT display has gone bonkers a couple of times within the first 2000 miles of riding. I wouldn't want that to happen with suspension.
  • Expensive. My bike, with the various after-market essentials like crash bars, center stand and luggage cost well north of US$20K. Knowing how many times I crash an off-road machine, I'd much rather save $7K on the bike and spend it on an extra trip to the gas station every now and then.
Honda themselves, with the intro of the CRF1100 series clearly markets the standard AT as the off-road machine and the ATAS as a much more touring-biased bike. I think their perspective here is totally accurate and should be trusted.

Just another 2 cents from an ATAS rider.
 

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Owner of a 2020 ATAS es and a 2021 standard ( both not DCT)
Suggest the standard for off-road use
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Owner of a 2020 ATAS es and a 2021 standard ( both not DCT)
Suggest the standard for off-road use
I think you may have a bit of confirmation bias here. 2 of the 3 ATAS owners who replied were actually advocating against the ATAS as an off-road choice. Count me in with that group. I ride a 2021 ATAS/ES and while the bike suits my 80% road 20% off-road riding style well, I would never recommend it over the standard AT as an off-road machine. Nobody here is Toni Bou, and you can see even he's riding the Standard AT with manual transmission.

Reasons why I don't recommend the ATAS/ES for considerable off-road (as opposed to dirt road) use:
  • HEAVY, and top-heavy at that. With a full tank of gas the bike has a very narrow balance point.
  • Forgetful. If you drop your bike while off-road (as I have done many times) and you need to power it down to pick it up, you must remember to disable wheelie control, traction control and ABS all over again. If you don't (as I've neglected to do on more than one occasion) you may find yourself stalling out on what is a totally ridable incline only because the electronic rider interventions are kicking in.
  • Electronic. While I love the ability to easily change suspension characteristics with my electronic suspension, I would be concerned about relying on such electronics over many thousands of miles of off-road abuse. Heck, even the TFT display has gone bonkers a couple of times within the first 2000 miles of riding. I wouldn't want that to happen with suspension.
  • Expensive. My bike, with the various after-market essentials like crash bars, center stand and luggage cost well north of US$20K. Knowing how many times I crash an off-road machine, I'd much rather save $7K on the bike and spend it on an extra trip to the gas station every now and then.
Honda themselves, with the intro of the CRF1100 series clearly markets the standard AT as the off-road machine and the ATAS as a much more touring-biased bike. I think their perspective here is totally accurate and should be trusted.

Just another 2 cents from an ATAS rider.
I guess is clear that spec by spec the STD 1100 mt is slightly more capable than the ATAS 1100 mt on off road. But a motorcycle don´t ride by itself, so we need to consider the skill level and how much better you want to be in what area. If i was going to use the bike 90% on off road, ok, i would go for the STD, hands down, but (unfortunately) there is always a big piece of asphalt between me and the off road. It´s like choosing a tire, you can not have a tire that is good for dry, wet, mud, sand, etc. you need to choose where you want to be better. Anyhow, here why I have made my mind for the ATAS (with the valuable help of your opinions!):

  • only 9kg heavier than the standard. I will be installing an titanium exhaust + link pipe which also eliminates the servo that controls the exhaust valve. i suspect will save around 5kg. since i will be removing the rear footpegs (no rear passenger here) -1kg . At the end we are talking about 3kg of difference.
  • I am big guy, 100kg, 191m, go to the gym almost everyday. Getting up a bike is still (i am 40) easy for me most of the times.
  • electronic suspension: we should not misunderstand what the "eletronic" on this case means. it´s a mechanical shock with electronic controls. not a real electronic shock (like the one we find in some cars for example). So, in the case there is a fail on those controls, the shock will not "stop working".
  • being expensive is a real issue, it cost 18% more than the STD 1100 non ES MT down here in Brazil. But i guess that for the package, it worth.

here some videos of the kind of ride i use to do with my ex-crf 1000 (which was heavier than the ATAS by the way :) - so you guys can have an idea of what "off road" means for my kind of use.

New video by Andre L.

New video by Andre L.

New video by Andre L.

New video by Andre L.

I would like to thank you all for your time helping on this topic. Your oppinion (in favor or against the Atas) has been highly appreciated. it´s crazy that such a common question (atas vs std on off road) has so little info!

THANK YOU ALL!
 

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I guess is clear that spec by spec the STD 1100 mt is slightly more capable than the ATAS 1100 mt on off road. But a motorcycle don´t ride by itself, so we need to consider the skill level and how much better you want to be in what area. If i was going to use the bike 90% on off road, ok, i would go for the STD, hands down, but (unfortunately) there is always a big piece of asphalt between me and the off road. It´s like choosing a tire, you can not have a tire that is good for dry, wet, mud, sand, etc. you need to choose where you want to be better. Anyhow, here why I have made my mind for the ATAS (with the valuable help of your opinions!):

  • only 9kg heavier than the standard. I will be installing an titanium exhaust + link pipe which also eliminates the servo that controls the exhaust valve. i suspect will save around 5kg. since i will be removing the rear footpegs (no rear passenger here) -1kg . At the end we are talking about 3kg of difference.
  • I am big guy, 100kg, 191m, go to the gym almost everyday. Getting up a bike is still (i am 40) easy for me most of the times.
  • electronic suspension: we should not misunderstand what the "eletronic" on this case means. it´s a mechanical shock with electronic controls. not a real electronic shock (like the one we find in some cars for example). So, in the case there is a fail on those controls, the shock will not "stop working".
  • being expensive is a real issue, it cost 18% more than the STD 1100 non ES MT down here in Brazil. But i guess that for the package, it worth.

here some videos of the kind of ride i use to do with my ex-crf 1000 (which was heavier than the ATAS by the way :) - so you guys can have an idea of what "off road" means for my kind of use.

New video by Andre L.

New video by Andre L.

New video by Andre L.

New video by Andre L.

I would like to thank you all for your time helping on this topic. Your oppinion (in favor or against the Atas) has been highly appreciated. it´s crazy that such a common question (atas vs std on off road) has so little info!

THANK YOU ALL!
Those are some great clips! Solid riding on some fun-looking terrain. Best of luck with your decision, and frankly I don't think you can go wrong here. I've taken my ATAS/ES on stuff I didn't think I could complete and the bike did not disappoint. ENJOY.
 

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I ride a similar profile to you, with the added challenge of significant elevation changes, on the '20 1100 AS. I think it fits the bill perfectly. It is much more manageable than the 1000 AS due to lowered ride height and other ergonomics. The weight difference between the non-DCT versions is only 29lbs, so negligible when it comes to getting the bike off the ground, which I've never struggled to do. The bike rides like an oversized Enduro to me and I don't find it a chore to beat the piss out of it in challenging terrain. And when it comes to blasting 800km paved days through the mountains, the AS is an absolute animal. A few buttons at the end of the trail and the suspension stiffens up and is ready to carve canyons with the best of them. The tubeless wheels are a huge bonus as I don't dread flats anymore. The fuel capacity is worth it. Riding with a friend on his '18 base model is a pain in the ass as we have to stop way too often for gas. We once had to ride a 180km detour for gas because of his bike.

There are definitely moments where I wish I was on a 250 instead of an 1100, but never a time when I think that having bought the base model AT would make my situation any easier.

View attachment 63863
So Indelible, what tires did you swap the OEMs out for?
 

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I destroyed the stock tires on my first offroad trip. Replaced with Mitas E07/+. Ran two sets and am now on a set of Motos Tractionator GPS. Will be popping those off early to mount a fresh set of Dunlop Trailmax Missions for a 12,000km trip in July.
Thanks for the tip. I took the stock Battlax 90/10s on gravel this weekend and did not like tho I think they’re good on road / rain. That’s rad you just went straight off road. Can’t wait to swap them out for something chonkier.

Any argument about the viability of the ATAS for anything other than touring I’d point to C90 Adventures as the ultimate remedy to what people think an adventure motorcycle has to be. The ATAS is top heavy but with my hobbit legs and low seat center of gravity feels good & low. And that range!

And one other thing to the original poster - it seems motorcycles are hard to come by this year. I bought an ATAS DCT because the dealer had just got it in the day I walked in and every Honda I was interested in was sold or on back order til who knows when. Having just survived a global pandemic I went screw it I’ll get the bike of my ultimate dreams.
 

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Any argument about the viability of the ATAS for anything other than touring I’d point to C90 Adventures as the ultimate remedy to what people think an adventure motorcycle has to be.
Not that I needed another YouTube channel to watch, but this is just a great reminder of motorcycle touring adventure. Thanks.
 

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These are not my videos, but they are places I ride. The first video is the road I destroyed the stock touring tire on. I also found out on this road about the wheelie control stalling the bike out. Despite both of those problems, the bike still rocks that road every single time I ride it. I've solo'd this three times just this year on my fully loaded AS. In particular, watch from minute 6 to minute 18. Locally that is considered pretty entry level road conditions and elevation. The ATAS absolutely annihilates all the climbs and descents.

The second video is indicative of typical road conditions around here. Lots of washouts, water and elevation.

(minute 6-18 in particular)


If you have the physical capacity to manhandle the bike, the experience and the grit, the AS is a capable, fun, aggressive bike that takes a beating and goes the distance.
 

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These are not my videos, but they are places I ride. The first video is the road I destroyed the stock touring tire on. I also found out on this road about the wheelie control stalling the bike out. Despite both of those problems, the bike still rocks that road every single time I ride it. I've solo'd this three times just this year on my fully loaded AS. In particular, watch from minute 6 to minute 18. Locally that is considered pretty entry level road conditions and elevation. The ATAS absolutely annihilates all the climbs and descents.

The second video is indicative of typical road conditions around here. Lots of washouts, water and elevation.

(minute 6-18 in particular)


If you have the physical capacity to manhandle the bike, the experience and the grit, the AS is a capable, fun, aggressive bike that takes a beating and goes the distance.
Now I’ve got the dream bike need to do some of these dream rides. Gnar. You’re making me miss BC so bad.
Now what’s this about the wheelie control stall?? Is there a thread about it?
 
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