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Keep in mind lithium batteries don't behave "linearly" like lead-acid based batteries.

Onboard battery management electronics keeps the battery voltage from dropping below a minimum for safety motives. Not sure what that is, but maybe around the 9 to 10V range. Therefore, it may appear always greater than 50% capacity, unless the battery cells are truly troubled.
 

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The typical safe voltage range of a single lithium cell is between 3v to 4.2v (this can vary slightly depending on the exact cell chemistry), with the nominal voltage being 3.7v. As far as I am aware, lithium motorcycle battery's normally use 4 cells in series coupled to the BMS.
 

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The typical safe voltage range of a single lithium cell is between 3v to 4.2v (this can vary slightly depending on the exact cell chemistry), with the nominal voltage being 3.7v. As far as I am aware, lithium motorcycle battery's normally use 4 cells in series coupled to the BMS.
That is handy knowledge if one is attempting to "rescue" a complete battery component. I reckon most considering that route would just replace the battery, or replace all the internal cells and take no chances with piecemeal cell swaps. Cell manufacturing capability and quality vary greatly across offerings.
 

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If/when mine dies I will definitely be opening it up to take a peek inside. I have been fortunate so far, it still seems to be in good health, even after being drained to the point of the BMS shutting the battery off.
 

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I left the key in the on position for a few hours after a short ride, and then the battery appears to be dead. What options doI have to get it charged again?
I had the same problem, and the people at honda said that once a lithium battery is drawn past a certain voltage level, it cannot be recharged, buy a new one (@ 600 USD) insanity, anyway, I rather bought one of these, NOCO - 5-Amp Smart Battery Charger - GENIUS5 which has a repair function... hey presto, 3 hours later, my battery was in the green and overnight fully loaded, holding charge like new. I can recommend one.
 

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I have jumped my 19 twice from my truck. Cables hooked up, press starter to crank and disconnect cables. Did not have truck. running. Bike charged itself in just a few miles. No problems with bike or truck.
 

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IDK about the earlier models but the 2020's have a maintenance charger connector grub the factory. Can't figure out how to attach a picture but it's directly above the left footpeg and side stand.
Yeah, I'm not finding this on my 2020...any chance you can figure out the picture thing?
 

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I had the same problem, and the people at honda said that once a lithium battery is drawn past a certain voltage level, it cannot be recharged, buy a new one (@ 600 USD) insanity, anyway, I rather bought one of these, NOCO - 5-Amp Smart Battery Charger - GENIUS5 which has a repair function... hey presto, 3 hours later, my battery was in the green and overnight fully loaded, holding charge like new. I can recommend one.
I have the NOCO G3500. The repair function works very well on lead acid batteries. It is not recommended by Noco that the repair function be used on Lithium batteries. It may work and that recommendation may be disclaimer to prevent legal action if something goes wrong. Who knows? The lithium charge feature does work and makes these a great charger to have around. When my traditional tech charger died, I had some reservations about the NOCO. After several years of use I have no regrets and would not hesitate to buy another.
 

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Update: thanks for all the help...Problem resolved.
Lesson Learned: always turn the bike off with the key, not the kill switch.
1. I removed the battery from the bike (It had 2.3 volts remaining)
2. I purchased a Battery Tender® 6V/12V, 4 Amp Lead Acid & Lithium Selectable Battery ' Charger ($58 @Lowes)
3. When I connected it and it went into recovery mode for 45 mins, then charged the battery in 4 hrs.
4. Reinstalled the battery with a battery charger connection wire to plug in the charger, located the plug next to key for seat removal. The wire was included with the charger.
5. I connected the charger to the battery and plugged it into the 120v outlets. This has a auto switch to prevent overcharging.

Link : Battery Tender Charger for Lithium Ion Batteries
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Just to share my experience, a month or so ago I killed my battery by leaving the key in the on position. Assuming there was nothing wrong with jumping it, that’s what I did. Just killed it the same way again the other day, pulled the battery out, found out it is lithium, bought the same charger as Dan Reed, and hooked it up. It took a long time to recover, maybe 6ish hours, before going into charge mode, and then it bricked. Currently reads 0V. I saw some lithium-ion’s BMS will disconnect if a load is applied and they are discharged, so I tried powering it off of my car battery, to see if I could “awaken” it, to no avail. Hopefully the initial jump ****ed up the BMS circuitry leading to a failure being recovered the second time. Otherwise, I was having no problems after jumping it the first time.
 

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Hey @Ltwatters, sometimes some battery chargers that "auto detect" whether it is a lead acid or lithium-based battery get it wrong. I wait until the correct charger LED indicator lights up and/or I force it to go into the proper charge mode. If you walk away and it chooses the "lead acid" charging algorithm, that could spell the end of the lithium battery, especially if the charge "desulphates" prior to recharging.

Welcome to the Forum!

Feel free to introduce yourself at the New Member Introductions area of the Forum.
 

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Hey @Ltwatters, sometimes some battery chargers that "auto detect" whether it is a lead acid or lithium-based battery get it wrong. I wait until the correct charger LED indicator lights up and/or I force it to go into the proper charge mode. If you walk away and it chooses the "lead acid" charging algorithm, that could spell the end of the lithium battery, especially if the charge "desulphates" prior to recharging.

Welcome to the Forum!

Feel free to introduce yourself at the New Member Introductions area of the Forum.
Hello. The aforementioned battery tender instructs you to manually select battery type [AGM/Flooded or Lithium (LiFePO4)] and voltage [12V or 6V] prior to connecting the battery. I had it set to 12V and Lithium. My guess is having jumpstarted the motorcycle previously damaged the BMS. Less likely, the battery tender may not be entirely compatible for revive. I’ve ordered a replacement OEM battery and, if I need to revive it at some point, I’ll update with the result.
 

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Hello. The aforementioned battery tender instructs you to manually select battery type [AGM/Flooded or Lithium (LiFePO4)] and voltage [12V or 6V] prior to connecting the battery. I had it set to 12V and Lithium. My guess is having jumpstarted the motorcycle previously damaged the BMS. Less likely, the battery tender may not be entirely compatible for revive. I’ve ordered a replacement OEM battery and, if I need to revive it at some point, I’ll update with the result.
To follow up, I got the OEM replacement, put it on the tender until it was completely charged (I tested the voltage intermittently to ensure correct operation), put it in the next day, and took it for a test ride. I have a DCT and the transmission was acting funny for a few minutes (lagged starting into neutral and going into gear, idled strange, and jerked a bit setting off). I’m guessing there are capacitors the transmission depends on that slowly lost charge in the few weeks the motorcycle was down. Anyways, seems good now.
 

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Just to share my experience, a month or so ago I killed my battery by leaving the key in the on position. Assuming there was nothing wrong with jumping it, that’s what I did. Just killed it the same way again the other day, pulled the battery out, found out it is lithium, bought the same charger as Dan Reed, and hooked it up. It took a long time to recover, maybe 6ish hours, before going into charge mode, and then it bricked. Currently reads 0V. I saw some lithium-ion’s BMS will disconnect if a load is applied and they are discharged, so I tried powering it off of my car battery, to see if I could “awaken” it, to no avail. Hopefully the initial jump ****ed up the BMS circuitry leading to a failure being recovered the second time. Otherwise, I was having no problems after jumping it the first time.
I'm at the same point. 0v reading so the battery bricked. I found this little write up treasure. It seems that the fuses inside don't reset... sooooo hopefully this fix will work..


So the bike wouldn't start in the cold so I left the lights on for 2 mins and it still wouldn't start so I tried turning it over for 10 seconds .. off for 30... turning over for 10 off for 30 secs then it finally started. I let it warm up for a few minutes then went on my merry way yo meet up with a lady friend. Half way there the bike started surging and the dash was flickering and then death... nothing was working..... so that's how mine bit the dust.
 

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IDK about the earlier models but the 2020's have a maintenance charger connector grub the factory. Can't figure out how to attach a picture but it's directly above the left footpeg and side stand.
Can you elaborate on the charging connector that you mentioned near the side stand on 2020 models. I don’t see it
 
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