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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good morning.

So last weekend I had the stock tires on my DCT replaced with Trail Attack 2s. The mechanic put way too much pressure in the tires so they were a bit squirrelly at first, but after I adjusted them to the factory recommended settings they felt good.

However, I noticed yesterday that backing out off a parking spot I could hear a squeak from the front wheel. I just put the bike on the center stand and the front wheel does not spin freely — i.e., it stops turning as soon as I stop applying rotational force. It also seems like the rear doesn't spin as freely as I would expect; it stops after maybe 6-8 inches of rotation at the tire, with application of a moderate initial force. I don't know if that is normal back pressure from the transmission, or also a sign of brake drag on the rear.

I am hesitant to adjust the brakes / wheel position myself unless you guys say it is easy. That said, I'm comfortable with general wrenching.

Any advice on how to set up / adjust the brakes or wheel position would be appreciated, as would suggestions on which curse words to use when I call the shop manager.

Thanks!
 

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There are no front brake adjustments. If the spacers are in the wheel properly and the axle seated against the shoulder, you are good to go. All disc brakes drag a little but if something is amiss it will likely heat up fast and stink of burning brakes after riding. You can easily check if the axle is seated against the fork leg by loosening the four axle pinch bolts then putting a spanner on the axle nut and make sure it is tight. Be sure to re-tighten the pinch bolts after checking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There are no front brake adjustments. If the spacers are in the wheel properly and the axle seated against the shoulder, you are good to go. All disc brakes drag a little but if something is amiss it will likely heat up fast and stink of burning brakes after riding. You can easily check if the axle is seated against the fork leg by loosening the four axle pinch bolts then putting a spanner on the axle nut and make sure it is tight. Be sure to re-tighten the pinch bolts after checking.
Thanks! No burning brake smell before or after tire change. I'll do the check you suggested, but it sounds like you don't think the symptoms/conditions I described are abnormal then?
 

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There are spacers on either side of the wheels to maintain the correct distance and align with the brake caliper. If they overtighten too much when assembling after your change there is more pressure against the brake caliper and pads. If you can put it on the centre stand loosen the axle bolt on the front and get it just snug and I bet you'll notice that rubbing/drag goes away.
 

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There are spacers on either side of the wheels to maintain the correct distance and align with the brake caliper. If they overtighten too much when assembling after your change there is more pressure against the brake caliper and pads. If you can put it on the centre stand loosen the axle bolt on the front and get it just snug and I bet you'll notice that rubbing/drag goes away.
Sorry, this is partly incorrect. Over tightening the axle nut may strip the threads but will not affect wheel alignment if installed properly. The shoulder on the axle against the left fork leg is what establishes alignment. The only way to misalign or bind the wheel with the spacers is to incorrectly tighten the pinch bolts before seating the axle shoulder against the left fork leg.
 

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Fair enough. Maybe I'm not explaining it well.
Having just done my tires I had the same rubbing of the brake pads and loosened off the axle and the pinch bolts and gave things a bit of a push and it alleviated the issue.

Sorry, this is partly incorrect. Over tightening the axle nut may strip the threads but will not affect wheel alignment if installed properly. The shoulder on the axle against the left fork leg is what establishes alignment. The only way to misalign or bind the wheel with the spacers is to incorrectly tighten the pinch bolts before seating the axle shoulder against the left fork leg.
 

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The work shop manual has the rear spacers the wrong way round, he might have spacers wrong if he went by shop manual
 
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