Honda Africa Twin Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of July's Ride of the Month Challenge! Theme: Drop it like it's hot!
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Yup, great old time enduro rider trick. Thanks for sharing that.

Actually practicing a tire change with the tool kit you carry on the bike is important. No trail side surprises.

Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
The preferred enduro method for repairing a puncture on the trail is to leave the wheel on the bike and just remove enough bead to pull out the punctured section of tube for repair. Much easier and faster if a patch will fix it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
The preferred enduro method for repairing a puncture on the trail is to leave the wheel on the bike and just remove enough bead to pull out the punctured section of tube for repair. Much easier and faster if a patch will fix it.
...and if you can figure out where the puncture is. Quite often a pinch flat, and nearly impossible to locate without removing the entire tube, unless you can see obvious damage to the rim...

All good info to have when you suffer a flat on the trail.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Very important, I'm not sure if he highlighted it in the video. You will notice the strap from the centre stand to the front wheel. This is to prevent the bike from coming off it's centre stand while there is no back wheel on the bike. It is very easy to knock the bike off the centre stand with this method so the strap is very important!

But it is an awesome method of breaking the bead on a trail.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Small F Clamp works fine.
There is a wooden flat on the unseen side so all force goes to that side seen in the pic.
Never failed to break any bead.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Try doing that on any type of incline or slippery surface and you are just asking for trouble. Why not just carry a bead breaker pro or the like, very little weight a thousand times safer and twice as fast for next to zero weight penality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Try doing that on any type of incline or slippery surface and you are just asking for trouble. Why not just carry a bead breaker pro or the like, very little weight a thousand times safer and twice as fast for next to zero weight penality.
Well one would assume if you're using the centre stand and removing the rear wheel you're on flat ground aren't you??????

As for the F clamp, while you cranking away on the thread to make it smaller the side stand has done the job in 0.5 seconds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Well one would assume if you're using the centre stand and removing the rear wheel you're on flat ground aren't you??????

As for the F clamp, while you cranking away on the thread to make it smaller the side stand has done the job in 0.5 seconds.

Those are both front wheels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Well one would assume if you're using the centre stand and removing the rear wheel you're on flat ground aren't you??????

As for the F clamp, while you cranking away on the thread to make it smaller the side stand has done the job in 0.5 seconds.
Would be nice if I could get a flat on level ground just never managed to do that, center stand works just fine on a incline just have the front wheel pointing up. Cant figure out where you would carry a clamp that size, as I say bead breakers are very light alloy and pack down real small and can be used as tire irons. I just dont like the idea of getting pinned under a bike for no good reason. Every time I have seen this attepted (the sidestand deal) it has always ended in tears.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top