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Discussion Starter #1
I'm 5'9" and weigh about 160 lbs, and I find it more difficult than expected to get the AT up on its (OEM) center stand. Sometimes I can do it easily and sometimes I simply can't. It may be down to a slight difference in surface angle but if so I haven't been able to determine what that difference is.

My move sequence is to stand on the left of the bike, put my left hand on the left bar and my right foot on the stand footrest, then push off and turn my body left as I shift my weight onto the footrest.

If anyone has any suggestions on how to better leverage my body weight or whatever, I'd appreciate hearing them.

Thanks!
 

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The one piece I don't see you mention is what do you do with your right hand/arm? The key IMO, is to get momentum going. You do it one quick "explosive" move...

I stand on the left side of my bike facing the bike. Left hand on handlebar to steady it, and right hand on the passenger peg extension used for mounting the OEM panniers.
I put my right foot on the centerstand foot rest. I push the centerstand down till it makes contact with the ground. Then when I'm ready, in a quick motion and with authority, I push down with my right leg on the footrest (using my weight too) while lifting with my right hand/arm on the passenger peg, with a slight motion to the rear.
 

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The one piece I don't see you mention is what do you do with your right hand/arm? The key IMO, is to get momentum going. You do it one quick "explosive" move...

I stand on the left side of my bike facing the bike. Left hand on handlebar to steady it, and right hand on the passenger peg extension used for mounting the OEM panniers.
I put my right foot on the centerstand foot rest. I push the centerstand down till it makes contact with the ground. Then when I'm ready, in a quick motion and with authority, I push down with my right leg on the footrest (using my weight too) while lifting with my right hand/arm on the passenger peg, with a slight motion to the rear.
Absolutely correct. The key is to lift with your right arm while pushing down with your foot. Actively think about creating distance between your right arm and right foot as you lift and separate. (reminds me of a bra commercial) :surprise:

I am also 5'6" and 160 and can put the bike on its center stand with relative ease.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Interesting. So I put my right hand goes on the pillion grab handle, because I have the OEM panniers in place. I think that means that my hand is farther back than the optimal leverage (as described by you guys) would require.

Actively think about creating distance between your right arm and right foot as you lift and separate.
I like that way of thinking about it and will give that a try.

Thanks!
 

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Interesting. So I put my right hand goes on the pillion grab handle, because I have the OEM panniers in place. I think that means that my hand is farther back than the optimal leverage (as described by you guys) would require.



I like that way of thinking about it and will give that a try.

Thanks!
Try grabbing the frame rail in front of the pannier or even the upper part of passenger footpeg hanger. It can help getting a lower grip as you lift.

 

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I think I have discovered the answer folks, and it's simple.
I could never understand people on the NC 750 forum having difficulty raising that bike which is a bit lighter and certainly smaller. But when I switched to the Africa Twin I was straining so much I pulled a muscle in my back Others on here were doing it with apparently little effort.
Then one day it popped on just like the NC750 used to and I realised that I had been trying to do it previously with the handlebars turned. If I straighten them up before pulling up it's almost as easy as the NC750 was. (I think the larger bike had been making me nervous about dropping it away from me so it seemed safer to turn the handlebars so the left grip was nearer to me - but of course the bike was in a 3 point locked position - two stand feet and the contact point of the tyre).
I don't think I have seen this mentioned (getting the front wheel straight) on either forum - probably because it's so obvious - doh.
And yes I use the left side pannier prong to lift with. It's just at the right height for me and I'd rather take the pannier off to put it on the centre stand if I have to.
Mike
 

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Yes to all points mentioned above. This is my first bike with a center stand. I struggle a bit too, and I'm 6'0" and 180 lbs - should be easy. It doesn't help that I also worry about dropping it on the right side while lifting it, because there's nothing to catch it if it starts to go over.

I learned the hard way that the weight of full panniers of tools/camping gear/clothes and food, make it way harder than it needs to be. Also, the panniers just get in the way. Although mentioned, I think the surface is an overlooked point. If there is even the slightest downhill and especially if there is a raised area under the stand, it will be exponentially more difficult. #physics
 

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With the Honda panniers on the bike, I lift with the right hand holding the pannier handle, my left hand on the handle bar and standing with my right foot on the center Stand. It is a bit more difficult with the panniers on the bike.


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Handlebars straight yes, your left hand does very little, is is all in the right boot/hand positioned as all the guys mention above. Right hand on pillion footpeg bracket, the pannier handle is too high with little leverage.
 

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Handlebars straight yes, your left hand does very little, is is all in the right boot/hand positioned as all the guys mention above. Right hand on pillion footpeg bracket, the pannier handle is too high with little leverage.
I guess it depends on your body proportions - the pannier prong seems perfectly placed for me
Mike
 

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I think he means the pannier handle for carrying the case vs the pannier prong down low that the passenger peg is mounted on. Getting a good grip down low and lifting at the same time that you push down on the stand with your foot is key.

Rob
 

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I think he means the pannier handle for carrying the case vs the pannier prong down low that the passenger peg is mounted on. Getting a good grip down low and lifting at the same time that you push down on the stand with your foot is key.

Rob
Ah yes. Don't think i'd like to try lifting it with the pannier box handle.
Can I ask the others on here who have (like me) said that it was virtually impossible, to just try the experiment of making sure the handlebars are completely square on (ie normal riding position), before trying the lift. Let us know if that eliminates the problem.
Mike
 

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Absolutely correct. The key is to lift with your right arm while pushing down with your foot. Actively think about creating distance between your right arm and right foot as you lift and separate. (reminds me of a bra commercial) :surprise:



I am also 5'6" and 160 and can put the bike on its center stand with relative ease.



Rob


I totally agree. The suspension sag helps you to lift the first few inches, which in turn starts a backward movement of the bike. Use this upward/backward momentum and it just pops up there.

Your left hand just keeps the front wheel straight to help the back/up thing, and of course keeps you steady.

If you have a DCT, make sure you don't have your parking brake on.


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I totally agree. The suspension sag helps you to lift the first few inches, which in turn starts a backward movement of the bike. Use this upward/backward momentum and it just pops up there.

Your left hand just keeps the front wheel straight to help the back/up thing, and of course keeps you steady.

If you have a DCT, make sure you don't have your parking brake on.


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Hmmmm that last comment has got me thinking. If you cut the bikes engine while it is in gear it doesn't put it into neutral until the next time you switch on the ignition. That means if you try and put it on the centrestand whilst the DCT still has it in gear, you are working against the clutch - admittedly not a big effect but it might make a difference
Mike
 

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A strap or similar is actually a good thought, I have the Tuturo oiler fitted to that 'peg' just forward of the rubber seat for the OEM panniers, and as has been mentioned getting a low down grip is key. I struggled a little using the handlebars and passenger grab rail to get it up and over even before I lowered the bike a little and now since fitting the panniers have been pondering this as I do not wish to constantly remove the pannier to use the centre stand.

I had the centre stand fitted from new and noticed 2 things compared to previous bikes - it seems to need more of a lift, and the rear wheel looks a bit higher off the deck than any other bike I can recall having a centre stand which led me to think the stand could actually be a tad shorter. The other thing is it is not so easy to 'get right in there' with your right leg and body to get a good heave due to the bracket holding the pillion peg - which I use for the oiler and the pannier mount though not for pillion, so it has to stay there.

I am still playing with this one and have not ruled out shortening the stand a little, but not so much as to compromise useability if I returned the bike to stock height if I ever sell.
 

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*snip*
The other thing is it is not so easy to 'get right in there' with your right leg and body to get a good heave due to the bracket holding the pillion peg - which I use for the oiler and the pannier mount though not for pillion, so it has to stay there.
*snip*
Are you saying it uses the actual peg, or just repurposes the holes? You can see that my Tusk pannier rack uses the passenger peg holes as a mounting point, but the Rugged Roads cover makes the actual peg unnecessary. The RR covers might be the best farkle I have added thus far.
 

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Dave - the OEM panniers use a rubber block which attaches to part of that peg and the base of the pannier slides onto - as well as the latches at the top which attach it to the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Well at the gas station today I tried grabbing the pillion peg bracket while using the center stand. Couldn't get a good grip at all and just had to muscle the bike up while holding the pillion grab bar (as usual). A strap might be just the ticket as the positioning varies by the height of the rider, arm length, etc. I'm thinking of trying a kayak handle like this one. Will see what I can find at West Marine tomorrow.
 

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Well at the gas station today I tried grabbing the pillion peg bracket while using the center stand. Couldn't get a good grip at all and just had to muscle the bike up while holding the pillion grab bar (as usual). A strap might be just the ticket as the positioning varies by the height of the rider, arm length, etc. I'm thinking of trying a kayak handle like this one. Will see what I can find at West Marine tomorrow.
I changed my front tire today and used the center stand. I grabbed the pannier rack just aft of where it attaches to the foot peg holes, and lifted as I put it on the center stand. SO MUCH EASIER than how I had been doing it (yanking the passenger handles back). I see now how superior this trick is.

I looked at the kayak handle... not sure about having that flop around. What about this Extra Beefy Paracord Bracelet, or something like that? That would supply paracord if I ever need it... a mult-tasker.
 
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