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Discussion Starter #1
I find it very hard to put the bike on the origonal centerstand ,
is it strenght or technique ?:frown2:
 

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I find it very hard to put the bike on the origonal centerstand ,
is it strenght or technique ?:frown2:
It is technique :) Hold the bike with one hand on the steering bar and second on the rear rack and level the bike. Put your leg on the stand and put the stand on the ground. The trick is to use your leg and not arms to lift the bike. Just stright up your leg while your foot is on the stand.

In case my "Ponglish" ;) is not understable, I've found a video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t6TGuO03wHM
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Bikers,

Maybe we could organise a bikecenterstand technique workshop,

Anyway, thanks for all the advice, I will try it .:wink2:
 

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I find it a struggle too, but practice seems to make it easier
I'm reasonably strong and normal sized at 5.11, so it's not a strength thing, but it's certainly more difficult than the centre stand was on my triumph
 

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Left hand on the handle bar/grip. Right hand on the passenger peg. Foot directly over the arm part of the centrestand. Push down hard with foot while giving a bit of upward force on the passenger peg. It'll come right up.
I can do it with my Varadero with the bags on and loaded (700+ pounds). You can do it! :)
 

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Hmmmm - I need some other ideas guys. My right knee is permanently injured and whilst I can lift the bike on to the centre stand using the right leg method, I can feel it damaging the knee. And I cant do it at all using the right hand on the rear grab handles or rack. I have to use the prong for the left side pannier. Which of course means I can't put it on the centre stand if the pannier is fitted.
Any thoughts?
Mike
 

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This may be obvious, but if you have the DCT version, make sure the park brake is not on - makes it 10 times harder to get up on the stand. By analogy, I would guess that a manual version should also be in neutral to make it easiest.
 

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I have two buggered knees. It's really technique and leverage.
If you're grabbing the rear handles you're grabbing too high.
Get down lower at the passenger peg and give a tug as you step on the stand (leverage).
If it hurts your knee your pushing too hard or in the wrong place. You'll get it!


Hmmmm - I need some other ideas guys. My right knee is permanently injured and whilst I can lift the bike on to the centre stand using the right leg method, I can feel it damaging the knee. And I cant do it at all using the right hand on the rear grab handles or rack. I have to use the prong for the left side pannier. Which of course means I can't put it on the centre stand if the pannier is fitted.
Any thoughts?
Mike
 

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I have two buggered knees. It's really technique and leverage.
If you're grabbing the rear handles you're grabbing too high.
Get down lower at the passenger peg and give a tug as you step on the stand (leverage).
If it hurts your knee your pushing too hard or in the wrong place. You'll get it!
Yep. Technique for sure. Power down with your thigh muscle then as the centre-stand gets to the pivot point, keep the momentum going and press down with the front of your foot using your calf muscle. The calf muscle is very powerful but you have to use your hands to lock yourself on to the bike otherwise you will just lift your body up into the air instead. That's why it's much harder if you lean across the bike. I just tried it with my left leg, facing my body both forwards and backwards, and it came up both times no problem. Using the calf muscle is also the best way to get it up that first few inches off the ground if you drop it.
 

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Yep. Technique for sure. Power down with your thigh muscle then as the centre-stand gets to the pivot point, keep the momentum going and press down with the front of your foot using your calf muscle. The calf muscle is very powerful but you have to use your hands to lock yourself on to the bike otherwise you will just lift your body up into the air instead. That's why it's much harder if you lean across the bike. I just tried it with my left leg, facing my body both forwards and backwards, and it came up both times no problem. Using the calf muscle is also the best way to get it up that first few inches off the ground if you drop it.
That's interesting Derek - I have tried the left leg while facing forwards, but it seemed too dangerous (in that I could easily drop the bike). Where do you put your hands if your body is facing backwards - I will give that a try
Mike
 

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I have the rear preload set as per factory. Close to low 7 turns up I think. So I heaved it on to the centre stand and dialled in full preload. Then took it off the stand and tried again. It seemed much easier. Is that possible?
Mike
 

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I have the rear preload set as per factory. Close to low 7 turns up I think. So I heaved it on to the centre stand and dialled in full preload. Then took it off the stand and tried again. It seemed much easier. Is that possible?
Mike
Yes, the bike is sitting higher on the rear suspension so a little less travel/leverage for you. Your extra preload has helped you a little.
 

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I personally find that getting the AT on to the Honda centrestand is pretty easy. Way easier than on my Tiger 800 XCX or my son's Kawasaki ER-500, as examples. As far as technique goes, it really is about getting as much weight on the foot piece as possible. Best of luck!
 

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I personally find that getting the AT on to the Honda centrestand is pretty easy. Way easier than on my Tiger 800 XCX or my son's Kawasaki ER-500, as examples. As far as technique goes, it really is about getting as much weight on the foot piece as possible. Best of luck!
Dave (and others saying the same thing). I appreciate the advice but I don't understand it. If all that was required was weight on the stand protrusion then you wouldn't have to touch the bike other than applying all your weight to that point. That obviously wouldn't work so it is relying on muscles and tendons and sinews to apply a substantial force between that point on the stand and wherever else you are holding the bike. The critical things seem to be
The stance you adopt to maximise strength deployment without injury
The points on the bike you hold
The direction of application of the lifting/pulling force.

From the comments so far - it looks like favourite point is the pillion footpeg (but that puts your back in a dangerous position to apply force). And holding the left handgrip (do people pull back hard with this or just use it for steadying)? I'm not sure yet whether lifting up or pulling backwards on the footrest is best.
Mike
 

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Stand with your right foot on the stand. Stand astride the bike. Left hand on the front left grip. Right hand on passenger peg. Step down and pull up at the same time. Works for small bikes right up to the behemoth bikes like the Goldwing. Maybe we need to do an instructional video?
 

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Stand with your right foot on the stand. Stand astride the bike. Left hand on the front left grip. Right hand on passenger peg. Step down and pull up at the same time. Works for small bikes right up to the behemoth bikes like the Goldwing. Maybe we need to do an instructional video?
This is the exact technique I use except that my right hand is on the pillion handrail, perhaps natural for me because I am 6ft4
 
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