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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I don't want to hassle with spray oil cans, so any idea witch chain oiler is easiest and best for new AT? Scottoiler, OSCO, some DIY?

Scottoiler has vSystem - Honda Africa Twin Edition, not sure, what is the edition part, is it colour or something? Price is same than basic v-model.

I had OSCO in my "Lil'10" (XT660Z). Device itself works fine, but I didn't like the mounting parts and original nozzle system was poor. Had to build my own parts, it was too much DIY...

Any other good choices in the market?
 

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There is PDoiler and Prooiler. But PDoiler is much cheaper and electric pump witch I prefer.Prooiler has a gps controled possibility but I think about 280€. PDoiler 86 £.
 

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I had a Scottoiler on a previous bike when I lived in the UK. It was ok, but I can't say I ever really got the flow rate right. The thick oil in it also makes for a very dirty looking chain, and seems to attract dirt/dust. So when you do wash your chain, it's annoying.

I think there is a case for them in very wet climates, but in dry and dusty Colorado where I am I think it would be more trouble than it's worth.
 

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The thick oil in it also makes for a very dirty looking chain, and seems to attract dirt/dust. So when you do wash your chain, it's annoying.
Thanks for that, Scottoiler were claiming that it reduces dirt stick which made me suspicious. I think I'll pass and stick with ceramic lubricants.
 

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Found picture of the Loobman chain oiler I installed on my NC700X. Oil hose leads to the rear chain sprocket. Push button operated and little oil flows on the rear sprocket. At the end of the oil hose is a oil delivery head which 'grips' on both sides of the chain sprocket.
Loobman, made in UK, costs some GBP 30. Oil used Stihll Synth Plus, chainsaw lub oil. Simple and works very well. In use for 4 yrs.
 

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Do it yourself chain oiler.

I am amazed at hom much those commercial chain oilers cost. I like to bodge things together to save money that I could spend for gas to go riding. I have a system in use now that has about 60,000 miles on it and works brilliantly. It cost $7. to build. If any of you are handy fabricators and have some interest I could take some pictures and give a quick description.
 

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Is there a real benefit to having a chain oiler if you are running an o-ring chain?
I think the answer has to be yes I have used several and I think they do make chains and sprockets last much longer. If you are riding in wet or dusty/gritty conditions I would think they double or more the chain life. What ever one you choose I think making sure the chain is wet with oil therefore throwing of grit is the thing that saves the chain and sprockets. Depending on how far you ride at a time will make the decision for you on how much you are willing to pay to get either a manual or an automated solution. I have used the Loobman on several bikes and they work great and if its very dusty and you have water crossings you can dump lots of oil on the chain but I would always run out on long trips. The Scottoilers I found to be quite sensitive to the oil and temp and again I was always dumping a lot of oil. I now run a ProOiler and I think they are very good you can travel 5000km plus runs on a single fill and not have to think about it, the chain is always clean and wet.
 

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Hoping to Fit my Tuturo at the weekend , worked really well on My F800 Adv .. no need for Vacuum take off etc :)
 

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DIY chain oiler. Bodge this.

This is pretty easy on the difficulty scale. The only part that you need fabricate is a simple bracket to mount the reservoir. The other main part is the pump. That is a primer bulb for a 2 stroke chain saw or weed wacker engine. The reservoir is a small bottle of 2 stoke oil for those same engines. Both of those are sourced from your favorite lawn and garden store. The feed line from the reservoir bottle cap and the final feed line to the chain is soft brass tubing. Connect both brass tubes and the pump with soft plastic tubing.
You will need to find a convenient place to install the primer pump. I used this plastic cover over the stater solinod. Place the reservoir bottle anywhere that is easy to refill. Mine is just in front of the side cover. The brass tube goes through a hole in the bottle cap that you will drill, then extends down to the bottom of the bottle. The feed line to the chain sprays on the lower chain run just aft of the counter shaft sprocket. It is secured using the same clips that secure the wiring to the side stand switch. This brass tubing will hold its shape after you bend it.

I use ATF (auto matic transmission fluid) it is dirt cheap, universally available, and flows well. The chain loves it. On a long ride I will use it maybe 4 times a day (say 300-400 miles). As I come to a stop for a break or lunch or the end of the day and slowing down below 10 mph I will give it a couple of pumps. That way it will soak into the chain some before the next moto begins. I will post this now and the pictures will follow.
 
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