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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys! so my Dealership is recommending that I replace my chain and sprockets!! I looked online and there SOOO many options ranging from $50 $220! I don't know where to even begin! Any advice from you guys? I am pretty rough on the bike, so I feel like I would want to get a tougher chain.... ALSO, thoughts on going down a tooth on the front sprocket? Wouldnt mind a bit more low-speed control offroad. Thanks guys!
 

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If you are buying a new chain, I'd go 3-teeth up on the rear instead of 1-tooth down on the front. Smaller front sprockets wear the chain and swingarm guides faster. I've eyeballed it - looks like the chain guide will work with a bit larger rear sprocket. You will need a slightly longer chain than stock.
Pay decent $ for a quality chain but keep with the same link size.
Your speedo and ODO with smaller front or larger rear sprocket will read higher than actual.
 

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I second the advice of going up on the rear sprocket vs down on the front. The smaller the sprocket, the smaller the turning radius the chain has to make - it has to turn a tighter angle and therefore bend more. You can also "fine-tune" your gearing better by changing the rear, since 1 tooth up front roughly equals 3 in the rear.
Any sprocket manufacturer should be fine as long as they're steel. Aluminum sprockets wear too fast.

For chains, stick with either DID, Renthal, or RK. And you want a riveted one, not a clip type master link. If you're doing it yourself, spend the money on a good rivet tool, watch some how-to videos, and practice a couple times on your old chain first. It's pretty simple - once you've done it a couple of times.
 

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For chains, stick with either DID, Renthal, or RK. And you want a riveted one, not a clip type master link. If you're doing it yourself, spend the money on a good rivet tool, watch some how-to videos, and practice a couple times on your old chain first. It's pretty simple - once you've done it a couple of times.
Yeah, do not get a clip type chain. I fitted one to one of my street bikes many years ago - lucky I checked it regularly because one day, even though the chain was still on, the clip was missing.
I use DID chain these days - mainly because I have the DID chain splitter/rivetter tool, but also because it is good chain. If you decide on doing it yourself with DID chain, make sure that you get the right size tool pins for the chain size, I think from memory the AT is 525. I've also found that it makes it real easy if you grind the top off the rivets with an angle grinder before splitting. Oh, and make sure you get a genuine DID tool, not a cheap copy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info guys! I was actually looking at the DID chains! I'm going to just have my dealer install it! A couple more questions

- What is our stock link size? 520?

-What number teeth are we running stock? I believe its 15/42 right?

-Last but not least, how do I know what length I should get when making that rear sprocket larger?
 

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Thanks for the info guys! I was actually looking at the DID chains! I'm going to just have my dealer install it! A couple more questions

- What is our stock link size? 520?

-What number teeth are we running stock? I believe its 15/42 right?

-Last but not least, how do I know what length I should get when making that rear sprocket larger?
525 chain 16/42 sprockets are stock. Just buy 120 links and cut to fit.
 

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I just asked my mechanic what a replacement set from Honda would cost me (1 chain + both sprockets)
340.- swiss francs (USD370.-)

This is without installation!
 
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