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I've always enjoyed coasting down long hills in neutral, engine off.
However, is this wise with the DCT model? The owners manual pg 162 states not to tow the bike with wheels on the ground, on any model AT. (There are going to be times where ATs will have to be towed!)
I'm thinking that if I leave the engine idling, it will keep the oil circulating & all will be well, but..........?? (& of course you can't kick it straight back into gear, but have to completely stop to select Drive)
What are your thoughts / advice?:confused:
 

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Hey Petey

Whilst no an expert, I personally will be totally okay with coasting in neutral and here is why:

The gearbox is mechanically a manual with actuators pushing the two clutches in and out. As such, when the bike is in neutral, either both clutches are disengaged, of there is a neutral position on the gearbox; either way there is no harm.

The reason it is dangerous to tow an automatic car any distance is because the oil is pumped from the input and not driven from the output. When you coast with no engine power through the gearbox there is no oil circulating which causes massive wear.

A lot of cars in the '50s had oil pumps on the output so could be towed.
 

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I will freely admit I have not worked on the AT or have I seen the Transmission drawing or studied the oil routing diagram. I do not make any claim to know any thing about the dual clutch tranny. Having said that I will tell you that big bike engines will pressure feed oil down the inside of the hollow input shaft and counter shaft. That will be how the 6 speed standard will be. That oil goes though oil holes drilled in the shaft to lube the bushings in the free spinning gears. That is half the gears.

Engine off there is no lube to those bushings. Engine at idle there is flow but at a lower pressure. Each free spinning gear mates to a splined gear on the other shaft.
When the engine is off and you coast down the mountain or tow the bike with the rear wheel on the ground the input shaft is stopped the counter shaft is turning. Every free spinning gear is spinning in relation to it's shaft. If you tow it very far you should remove the chain. A PITA. A trailer is a better option. Coasting down the mountain engine off is risky. I would not do it. Aside from the lubrication issue you might accidentally kick in first or second when you are up to speed. The drive dogs will surely scream as they crash into the slots in the adjacent gear. For me I will match road speed to an appropriate transmission gear with the engine running.
 

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errrrm .... I don't think it's possible to freewheel in neutral. At least that's the case on the NC750 DCT. You cannot put it into neutral until the bike detects it's at a standstill. I don't think there is even a way of fooling the system by (say) using the engine kill switch.
I guess you could stop the bike at the top of a long downwrd incline, select neutral and set off coasting but as you say would you have to stop the bike in order to select drive?
Mike
 

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I didn't see the engine off thing!
 

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It stays on gear until it stops if you kill the engine while running.
 

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That is now quite apparent now I actually have mine!

I have tried a couple of times to put it in Neutral whilst coasting to blip the throttle at lights.

Don't because you end up looking like an idiot!
 

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That is now quite apparent now I actually have mine!

I have tried a couple of times to put it in Neutral whilst coasting to blip the throttle at lights.

Don't because you end up looking like an idiot!
That is one of the problems you have with the At that we don't have with the NC. The engine sounds magnificent and even I was tempted to blip the throttle on the AT>:)>
Mike
 
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