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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if any members have experience using the Africa Twin for heavy traffic commuting? Living in central Bangkok commuting in heavy traffic is just a fact of life, with temperatures around 33c/91f it can be rather uncomfortable on a big bike. My current bike Triumph Speed Triple 1050 is great fun and agile enough to keep me moving in the grid lock but the heavy clutch, gearbox and general engine heat can be challenging at times.

I'd like to hear experiences of DCT or Manual owners under similar conditions, how the bike is control wise at walking pace, engine heat, clutch actuation and control, balance, etc. I have an idea that it will in fact be a better experience but as test rides are not allowed except en mass at organised events I am only guessing.
 

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I'm commuting through Tokyo on my DCT. Not summer yet, but no heat issues and the bike is very well balanced and extremely easy to ride in heavy traffic.
 

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I have a NC750X DCT which is a dream for commuting - partly because of the DCT but also because Honda have really worked on mass centralisation and lowering. They don't seem to have done this on the AT, but last week when I test rode one it was much easier to manhandle than I expected. And if you really MUST go for a manual box you won't be disappointed - the clutch is very light and the gearbox an absolute gem - finding neutral was the easiest I have ever experienced on any bike, and there were no clunks in any gear selection.
Mike
 

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I was wondering if any members have experience using the Africa Twin for heavy traffic commuting? Living in central Bangkok commuting in heavy traffic is just a fact of life, with temperatures around 33c/91f it can be rather uncomfortable on a big bike. My current bike Triumph Speed Triple 1050 is great fun and agile enough to keep me moving in the grid lock but the heavy clutch, gearbox and general engine heat can be challenging at times.

I'd like to hear experiences of DCT or Manual owners under similar conditions, how the bike is control wise at walking pace, engine heat, clutch actuation and control, balance, etc. I have an idea that it will in fact be a better experience but as test rides are not allowed except en mass at organised events I am only guessing.
... the DCT is ideal for commuting if this video is anything to go by. He's quite a character, so it's worth watching the whole video, but if you just want a quick idea, then skip to 5:00 mins in and you'll see it's very good: https://youtu.be/KexKW7gP0ow
 

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I am avoiding city traffic like a plague but if i had to ride in busy traffic there is no question which gearbox to choose , the DCT makes it fun and easy no pain in the left hand . I have tested both and even with the relatively light clutch on the manual version i was soon suffering .
 

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I commute daily on my DCT and as soon as I hit the traffic gridlock I change to manual mode. This allows me to lane filter without the unnecessary gear changes that the DCT imposes at times and no clutch to worry about. Once I filter through the traffic in first and second then change back to auto mode. Ride in S2 around town.
 

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I was wondering if any members have experience using the Africa Twin for heavy traffic commuting? Living in central Bangkok commuting in heavy traffic is just a fact of life, with temperatures around 33c/91f it can be rather uncomfortable on a big bike. My current bike Triumph Speed Triple 1050 is great fun and agile enough to keep me moving in the grid lock but the heavy clutch, gearbox and general engine heat can be challenging at times.

I'd like to hear experiences of DCT or Manual owners under similar conditions, how the bike is control wise at walking pace, engine heat, clutch actuation and control, balance, etc. I have an idea that it will in fact be a better experience but as test rides are not allowed except en mass at organised events I am only guessing.
It is a hot bike the radiators exit hot air right onto my knees (1.9 M tall) I have installed the lower air deflectors and I think they have made a difference but we have not had a hot day to test on since then its about 30 C here at the moment it was about 37 C when I thought it was hot on my knees. It would be very easy to make up some larger deflectors to get the air past your legs but if you are shorter maybe it might not hit your legs with the hot air anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all for your comments very good to have confirmation on manoeuvrability.
@SkipD Thanks for the heat info, what are these lower air deflectors?
 

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I commute daily on my DCT and as soon as I hit the traffic gridlock I change to manual mode. This allows me to lane filter without the unnecessary gear changes that the DCT imposes at times and no clutch to worry about. Once I filter through the traffic in first and second then change back to auto mode. Ride in S2 around town.
That's what I've been doing as well sometimes. Nice to have the choice and I love how manual drops into first at stops. All the pluses of a manual gearbox with none of the minuses.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Am I right in thinking at very low speed back brake is the speed control input? In stationary traffic a 80 degree right turn between cars seems like it could be awkward but if right foot down then front brake would be okay.
 

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Thank you all for your comments very good to have confirmation on manoeuvrability.

@SkipD Thanks for the heat info, what are these lower air deflectors?
Honda part

08R73-MJP-G50 they are two plastic strips that go onto the existing radiator air exit ducts that just push the air further away from the bike they are expensive for what they are but they do appear to work.
 
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