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I own a 2019 AT (non-DCT) and I am sure this question has probably come up million times. I had a flat on Saturday in my rear Shinko Tubeless tire and turns out it has a tube in it as well. Leaning towards converting it to tubeless since it is easier to patch it and for other reasons as well.

1. Is this advisable?
2. How much does it cost?
3. Is it reliable?
4. What is the correct approach?

Thanks in advance!

Ramjee
 

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This method is the most economical and works quite well with proper prep.



Or you can spend close to $2,000 and buy tubeless wheels.

 

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Been running on conversion using an Outex kit for over two sets of tires, and will be changing to a new set this spring for a 7-8,000 mile trip. I am totally confident in the process, but you need to do perfect prep.
 

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Been running on conversion using an Outex kit for over two sets of tires, and will be changing to a new set this spring for a 7-8,000 mile trip. I am totally confident in the process, but you need to do perfect prep.
(+1) Agreed - both processes must be anal-perfect preparation, ... or die.
 

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Haven't done my AT but I converted the wheels on my Guzzi V85TT over two years ago to tubeless using 3m sealant and 3m tape. No problems at all, but as mentioned, just have to get everything nice and clean before applying sealant. Probably cost about £50 all in to do both wheels.
 

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I converted my reat AT wheel to tubeless using the 3M N4412 tape and polyurethane sealant over 2 years ago and 3 sets of tires. I have had no issues at all. As others have said - prep is important. I also used the 3m adhesion promoter cleaner. I did not convert the front wheel as the rim does not have the safety bead as should be used with a tubless tire. The front is also a whole lot easier to replace a tube in than the rear when on the road.
 

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I purchased a Outex system for the rear and TPMS 12 months ago but have yet to install it. Waiting for a tyre change as my current bridgestone's are a tube type.
I would like to somehow try and protect the outex from being punctured. Does anyone have suggestions?
I chose not to do the front conversion. Not because of the lack of the safety bead but because of "see pic".
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Bicycle tire

The rider managed to limp home after hitting a cattle grate.
Any ideas welcomed
 

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I purchased a Outex system for the rear and TPMS 12 months ago but have yet to install it. Waiting for a tyre change as my current bridgestone's are a tube type.
I would like to somehow try and protect the outex from being punctured. Does anyone have suggestions?
I chose not to do the front conversion. Not because of the lack of the safety bead but because of "see pic".
View attachment 78838
The rider managed to limp home after hitting a cattle grate.
Any ideas welcomed
Heh, if bending rims is a thing, then yes, tube is the way to go (yikes).

Outex puncture? Do you mean if a spoke punches through the application?
 

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Heh, if bending rims is a thing, then yes, tube is the way to go (yikes).

Outex puncture? Do you mean if a spoke punches through the application?
Hey DT, My concern is if a nail or screw enters the tire it might destroy the outex system. (with my luck)
Its not a deal breaker for the mod just wondering if anyone had suggestions for some added protection.

Also with the outex, I vaguely remember a comment about a chemical reaction (or something) between the layers of tape. But I might have been dreaming too.
 

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Hey DT, My concern is if a nail or screw enters the tire it might destroy the outex system. (with my luck)
Its not a deal breaker for the mod just wondering if anyone had suggestions for some added protection.

Also with the outex, I vaguely remember a comment about a chemical reaction (or something) between the layers of tape. But I might have been dreaming too.
I suspect for the Outex application to be damaged by a nail-like object, it would have to be long enough to penetrate the tire and hit the inside-center area of the rim. With some bad luck, the nail would have to drag along the inside rim with enough force to scrap the Outex application, which is quite gooey (sticky, tacky) that is covering a spoke end. This might also be said with the "3M tape" approach, except the Outex application is much thinner and less prone to snagging on an object versus the "3M tape" which protrudes more off the rim.

In both the Outex and "3M tape" approaches, washing your rims directly with a solvent (e.g. WD-40, kerosene, etc.) can seep into the spoke ends and weaken the adhesive on the inside of the rim, thus delaminating the application resulting in a failure. It is best to use a rag dampened (not soaked) with the solvent and just wipe the rims in that manner.
 

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I suspect for the Outex application to be damaged by a nail-like object, it would have to be long enough to penetrate the tire and hit the inside-center area of the rim. With some bad luck, the nail would have to drag along the inside rim with enough force to scrap the Outex application, which is quite gooey (sticky, tacky) that is covering a spoke end. This might also be said with the "3M tape" approach, except the Outex application is much thinner and less prone to snagging on an object versus the "3M tape" which protrudes more off the rim.

In both the Outex and "3M tape" approaches, washing your rims directly with a solvent (e.g. WD-40, kerosene, etc.) can seep into the spoke ends and weaken the adhesive on the inside of the rim, thus delaminating the application resulting in a failure. It is best to use a rag dampened (not soaked) with the solvent and just wipe the rims in that manner.
Yeah Good point about washing
 

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Hey DT, My concern is if a nail or screw enters the tire it might destroy the outex system. (with my luck)
Its not a deal breaker for the mod just wondering if anyone had suggestions for some added protection.

Also with the outex, I vaguely remember a comment about a chemical reaction (or something) between the layers of tape. But I might have been dreaming too.
I am not sure about your "feeling" on Tire Slime or some equivalent, but if you goop up an Outex setup it might give you that extra protection. 🤷‍♂️

I use it in my tubes, I am not sure how the Outex tape will like it though.
 

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Knowing nothing specific about Slime, I do speculate it might be polymer-based, and if so, could be compatible with Outex.

If the Outex adhesive is water-based, then it could be problematic. <-- [edit] Actually maybe not likely true since its thin layer tape is directly exposed to any water that would enter in from the spoke end.

Experiment with vigilance.
 

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Hey DT, My concern is if a nail or screw enters the tire it might destroy the outex system. (with my luck)
Its not a deal breaker for the mod just wondering if anyone had suggestions for some added protection.

Also with the outex, I vaguely remember a comment about a chemical reaction (or something) between the layers of tape. But I might have been dreaming too.
If this is a big concern there is no reason you could not put a rim strip rubber as is used on the rim with a tube, over the outex or 3M tape to protect it from damage. You would have to secure it with some adesive to make sure the valve stem does not get covered by it though.
 

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Well,
I figure I might as well join in on the conversation. Yep, I did the 3M conversion about 15-16 months ago on my '18 A/T - A/S- DCT and it's been flawless ever since. I took my time, constantly red comments on here and checked out many videos on the process. I'd have gone with the Outex system but I figured what the heck, let's try the 3M system. I used 3M 5200 sealant around all the spoke heads and then 3M 4212 (I think that's the number) sealing tape on the rims over all the sealed spoke heads.

My process was to ultra thoroughly clean the rims. Then, use Alcohol to really wipe, in detail around each spoke head and finally, I used a heat gun to really make sure any and all moisture was dissipated from around each one. I got that rim almost too hot to handle. I then applied the 3M5200. The heat made that sealant flow really nice around each head. I let that cure for about 36 hours if I recall.

Then, I heated that rim again. I used a heat gun, not a torch. Then the tape application. Having that rim heated, really caused that tape to adhere. If I wanted to re-position the tape for any reason, TOO BAD, IT AIN'T MOVING! When the tape was finished being applied, I used one of those little steel knurled rollers you use for rolling patches on tubes to really seat that tape in twenty million directions (almost exaggerating here). I really wanted that tape to be seated.

Once done, I made the only mistake in the process. I re-installed the original rubber spoke head protector band. BIG MISTAKE! I later corrected that. But, I installed two brand new Dunlop Trailmax Mission tires at that time too. Man, what a pain in the A$$ that rear one was. I finally got it.

Those tires and wheels have been on there now for around 14 months or more and I've not lost a single pound of air other than ambient temp changes which is normal. I'd do it again in a heartbeat.
Scott
 

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I did both the front and rear on my 2017 using OTEX. As everyone else says prep is key. I did nine 2 years ago, 17000km and 3 tire changes. The only issue I had, was one of the rear tires would not seal at the bead in one location. a small dab of silicone on that spot on the bead and all was well. As for the front tire not having the ridge for a tubeless tire. I had a tube blow on the highway a number of years back on the front. The tire folded over in the blink of an eye sending me across the road into the oncoming lane ZERO directional control of the bike. When I stopped the tire was off the bead sitting in the center of the rim. So someone will have to explain to me what difference it makes if there is a tube in it or not when it goes flat.
 
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