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Corrosion Protection what to do?
New bike so wanting to look after her 馃槈
I have read ACF50 and XCP rust and Rustoleum .
Not sure which way to go or a combination of them .
The acrylic rustoleum ok for spokes and wheel rims so longer lasting ?Any issues onto the rims ?
ACF seems to be the leader and don鈥檛 mind farkling after a wash 馃榾.
7C5830F6-4A73-4BF4-8375-A162931DAFD2.jpeg
 

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Hi Deano. - there's quite a lot of advice on here about corrosion protection I'm guessing if you do a search for acf50 it will bring up threads that deal with alternatives. A quick summary of what I do:
  • rinse the lower parts of the bike after every winter ride once the salt has gone down. Then dry it off with a sidekick airblaster paying particular attention to drying the chain (total time about 5 minutes)
  • Every 3 weeks go round about 20 or 30 points on the bike with a paintbrush dipped in acf50 (these include engine cover bolts, screws in ends of handlebars, and many that hold plastics on. Takes about 15 minutes
  • once a season paint all the highly corrodable parts with Honda Moly 60 grease - this seems to stay on through downpours and vigorous washing of the bike even with shampoo. And it's a nice grey colour so looks like metal. Important places for this are anything to do with brake pipes and the 6 or 7 poorly painted mild steel brackets dotted around the bike. And the rear axle nuts and adjusters, and the 3 bolts that hold the chainguard down
  • Polish the upper parts of the bike AND the wheel rims and hubs with dry washless wax bought from The Range for 拢5.99. Just when it's looking a bit scruffy - takes about 30 minutes including the buffing up
Other points to note
  • The frame downtube is vulnerable - I bought a fenda extenda but also paint all the welds with moly 60.
  • The spokes are stainless (if it's a new bike) and will stay good but the nipples are plain steel and there's nothing you can do to protect them really.
  • Check the bike all over with a torch at regular intervals. My bike is reasonably well painted but the brackets holding the nearside radiator to the frame have been painted over rust. I've used hammerite to correct it myself.
  • the seat subframe has welds that rust - they did on my last AT but not this one.
  • I use an acf50 soaked cloth to protect the body of the brake callipers.
  • you don;t need to bother too much about the disk rotors - Honda have used nice stuff, but I once did see a red rusty front ABS sensor disk - this is not normal, but it might be worth doing that with acf50 on a brush
Mike
 

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Lol
Now I feel bad, mine is a dirty girl, had her two years and she鈥檚 seen 3(?) good washings with soap, quite a few rinsing鈥檚 to get the chunks of dirt off. Zero lube or grease except for the chain and few other points that require it.
I did wax her two times..
And I did clean and paint my OEM skid plate..
Not to mention I ride all year, salt caked roads in all..
 

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Wow... now that is a list... Mike you clean your bike like the Romans built coliseums... you are going to be able to hand them down to your Great Grandkids. hahaha

In all seriousness thanks for breaking it down for the rest of us, that is great content, I vote for a sticky to the maintenance board!!(y)(y)(y)
 

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I remember back when I used to race enduro and x country on dirt bikes. We would pressure wash the bikes really well and when we got home spray them down with WD40. Every other race tear down rear suspension linkage and re-grease etc. Ive been using Fluid Film on my AT. Took seat off and where welds are sprayed it there and down the sub frame tubes to hopefully mist the inside of the tubes. Take a brush and put it where I can and spray the rest. Its 2 years old and I have not seen any rust or corrosion yet. It does attract dirt particles pretty good but a pressure wash and then leaf blower to dry it off then re apply. Its gonna get dirty and its gonna get scratched but I haven't had a bike rot out on me in 40 years of racing/riding in the mud, sand etc.
 

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Deano - I think you said in another post you are in Stoke. That helps as you are not near the sea. I am about a mile away from the North Sea. My regime LOOKS time consuming but if it was I wouldn't do it. The rinse under the bike with a garden hose literally takes 2 minutes (and is also what Honda recommend in their user manual). The end of the hose is draped over the fence right next to my garage door so it's easy to grab as soon as I have put the bike on the centre stand. I also often do my riding boots at the same time as they are often white from the salt. I then move the bike into the garage, start it up and run it in first gear and use the sidekick airblaster to dry the chain as it turns. In truth the Africa Twin chain possibly doesn't need this but I developed the procedure with NC750 chains that only lasted 10-12k miles. The rinse and airblast doesn't remove the chain lube.
The painting with moly 60 grease takes me about 30 minutes at the end of October and then I may remove it in April, but it looks OK so I have left it in place and just touched it up a bit more.
There's no harm in the salt corrosion of the heads of bolts and screws - nor the badly painted mild steel brackets. But they look pretty bad so I think 10 minutes with a paintbrush and acf50, is worthwhile.
The waterless washnwax from the Range is the most time consuming thing. It's very rare that I wash the top half of my bike these days. The stuff removes dead flies, chain oil deposits and general grime, and it's got carnuaba wax in it which is supposed to be good stuff
Mike
 

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I wish I had the motivation to follow a strict prevention regime. I use S100 to wash my bikes which also acts as a corrosion inhibitor. Very lazy, but pretty effective on both fronts. I also tend to give it a bit of a WD40 wipe when I have it out, and some PLID on external moving parts (brake, shifter, pegs, stands etc)
 

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Hi Deano. - there's quite a lot of advice on here about corrosion protection I'm guessing if you do a search for acf50 it will bring up threads that deal with alternatives. A quick summary of what I do:
  • rinse the lower parts of the bike after every winter ride once the salt has gone down. Then dry it off with a sidekick airblaster paying particular attention to drying the chain (total time about 5 minutes)
  • Every 3 weeks go round about 20 or 30 points on the bike with a paintbrush dipped in acf50 (these include engine cover bolts, screws in ends of handlebars, and many that hold plastics on. Takes about 15 minutes
  • once a season paint all the highly corrodable parts with Honda Moly 60 grease - this seems to stay on through downpours and vigorous washing of the bike even with shampoo. And it's a nice grey colour so looks like metal. Important places for this are anything to do with brake pipes and the 6 or 7 poorly painted mild steel brackets dotted around the bike. And the rear axle nuts and adjusters, and the 3 bolts that hold the chainguard down
  • Polish the upper parts of the bike AND the wheel rims and hubs with dry washless wax bought from The Range for 拢5.99. Just when it's looking a bit scruffy - takes about 30 minutes including the buffing up
Other points to note
  • The frame downtube is vulnerable - I bought a fenda extenda but also paint all the welds with moly 60.
  • The spokes are stainless (if it's a new bike) and will stay good but the nipples are plain steel and there's nothing you can do to protect them really.
  • Check the bike all over with a torch at regular intervals. My bike is reasonably well painted but the brackets holding the nearside radiator to the frame have been painted over rust. I've used hammerite to correct it myself.
  • the seat subframe has welds that rust - they did on my last AT but not this one.
  • I use an acf50 soaked cloth to protect the body of the brake callipers.
  • you don;t need to bother too much about the disk rotors - Honda have used nice stuff, but I once did see a red rusty front ABS sensor disk - this is not normal, but it might be worth doing that with acf50 on a brush
Mike
This is great Mike, thank you.

I still feel that Honda have provided us a machine with a mix of excellent and poor quality components. To have to put all this effort to stop an adventure bike corroding, speaks volumes about some aspects of the bike. I guess we're lucky we're not talking about major component failure so at least Honda got that right. Had I known about about the bike's vulnerability to corrosion, I would have done a lot more research on other brands who may or may not be in the same boat. I breath a sigh of relief that I don't have to put all this effort into my cars and other bikes to keep them in good order. Honda's reputation has gone down I'm my view. I had been considering buying a Honda car for a family member and a CB1100 as a treat for myself. I'm going to rethink this idea of buying into more Honda kit.

Regards to all.
 

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CB1100 seems to be a little harder to find now. They will corrode in the U.K., but maybe less annoyingly compared to some U.K. AT owners near the coast. The rear fender comes to mind, but not too severely.
 
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