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Hi Dctfan, imwas talking about off road conditions.
to be honest i admire technology and i do know the tbw on the 2018... my 2016 is the first item when i didn’t buy the latest available technology. ..except for the dct. i think their use is great and helps lots of people who may be less smooth with breaking, throttle. I am coming from a multi 1100 and never thought i need tc at all. Throttle reaction, brakes, engine braking cornering were way way more sensitive than on the AT. However I never needed TC as I was concentrating how much throttle you can apply. I could feel through my bum as the traction was getting near the limit so i was backing off a bit etc. The Honda is a piece of cake. Slow turn in that can be a bit boring but so safe. throttle response is so smooth and linear. so predictable. This Honda is a piece of cake to ride even without electronics. After all electronic interfering is advantageous when the rider did not do something right in my opinion.
 

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Take DCT out of the equation (less confusing) and just compare the additional levels of TC.
The more levels the better. If you turn it off, this discussion is moot; more power to ya!

2018 HSTC.jpg
 

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I am controlling “soft” start with aft brake and also carefully opening throttle
Also happened to me 2 times on lights when I was playing with settings or hand brake that I accidentally twist the throttle and bike jumped
So now when I waiting for green lights I put bike in Neutral and no problem then with throttle



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Take DCT out of the equation (less confusing) and just compare the additional levels of TC.
The more levels the better. If you turn it off, this discussion is moot; more power to ya!

View attachment 53467
This is the theory. I fully agree the more setting you have is the better. However when you set it to 4 .... that is perfect as far as you can see the road ahead.....no too early and not too late interference from the TC everything is just right. Then the road gets a little bit more slippery.... jus a little bit more. Ideally you should have setting 5 but only for say another 200 meters then the road surface gets better and may be setting 3 would be even better. You will not change it as you are riding. In old AT you would be in setting 2. Covering the theoretical 2 and 5 at the same time. Anyway. That was my last post on this. The experience in my group with the 8 levels of tc on their tiger 800 is that they leave it either in the middle setting or turm it off. Using only two of the potential 8. I do the same actually without having an agree,ent on it. Either level 1 or off. What is good that everyone finds the best that suits him/her. I still believe after riding a lot off pavement that less in this case is more.
 

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I never set the TC for the surface, more for the level of slip I'm happy with. I never try to adjust it as conditions change. On a newer bike with 7 levels I would ride a bit on 3, 4 & 5 to see which I preferred. Once I worked out how much slip I was OK with (probably 4 or maybe 3), I'd end up using whichever level that was or off. So after some riding to try out the levels, there would then be 6 out of the 7 levels that never get used.
 

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I've settled on one coffee brand for close to a decade.
But that does not mean I will not try a cup of Starbucks now and then.
It's always good to have choices.
Just me; your tastes may differ. ;)
 

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I never set the TC for the surface, more for the level of slip I'm happy with. I never try to adjust it as conditions change. On a newer bike with 7 levels I would ride a bit on 3, 4 & 5 to see which I preferred. Once I worked out how much slip I was OK with (probably 4 or maybe 3), I'd end up using whichever level that was or off. So after some riding to try out the levels, there would then be 6 out of the 7 levels that never get used.
I may be wrong but I thought the level of slip depends on the condition of the surface. Loose or hard, dry or wet....
 

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I missed this thread 10 months ago. I've owned my 2017 DCT for 2.5 yrs and 16k miles. No confusion at all. S3 and never touch the TC. Never had an issue. Not been off road properly, just a few bumpy forest trails. Wonder if the OP has ridden a DCT in anger yet?
 

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My experience exactly. In two years and 30k miles I have never noticed the TC engage even once, and it's been left in the default (max) position for all that time. Today I was hammering around rough Yorkshire C-roads with big potholes and a fair bit of gravel No TC light at all. Then we went on pure gravel and stone across the top. Again no TC kicking in - mind you I am not an experienced off roader so I wasn't using much throttle. I have had the rear abs kick in once or twice in 2 years but not since I moved the brake pedal down to a more controllable position.
Mike
I should update this post of mine. The bike I was talking about was fitted with Dunlop Trailmax (or Trailsmart? - anyway whatever the bike is fitted as standard). When they wore out I switched to the Battlax that is normally fitted as an alternative standard to the production bike. In the next 8k miles I had 3 occasions when the TC cut in (on tarmac). And the tyres still had a lot of life left in when I changed them back to Dunlops at 8k miles. Since then (3k miles) I have not had the TC cut in once. My tentative conclusion is that the Dunlops are softer than the Battlax and provide more grip and less life?
Mike
 

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I may be wrong but I thought the level of slip depends on the condition of the surface. Loose or hard, dry or wet....
Unless you have traction control, in which case the bike reduces the power to the rear wheel to limit the slip. The amount of slip allowed before the system intervenes is what you control by changing the TC setting. In my experience TC3 (out of 3) allows so little slip that it feels like the bike has no power, TC2 allows some slip but not too much, TC1 allows quite a bit of slip before reigning it in so you can get the tail out quite a bit. Of course TC0 allows all the slip you want and maybe more than you want if you aren't careful. Without trying it I can't be sure if I wouldn't like maybe a little more slip than TC2 offers, though I find TC1 to allow too much.

Of course a slippery surface would mean that TC is MUCH more active and dry tarmac would generally have enough grip so that TC doesn't have anything to do.
 

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Consider how HSTC works- 1-2-3-4 fuel injectors are cut in certain way to cut power.
It may alternate OFF-2-OFF-4 or OFF-OFF-3 - 4
There is a limit to controlling power via fuel cutoff without reducing throttle input which is why there are only three levels.
The TC intervention is rough and intrusive.

With TBW (throttle by wire) there is more direct control for power regulation in addition to fuel cuts.
This enables the additional levels of TC and a much smoother intervention.
I posted the graphic explanation earlier.
 
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