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When I go out on my early morning rides, (around 05:30) , one of my areas to visit is an empty Dillards parking lot. I go on the side of the building so anyone passing by, doesn't get a chance to see this bone head making figure 8's inside parking lot lines. I've been riding for a great deal of time but, have never really mastered the art of what might be called close order drill (old military term for you Vets). Like many of you, making a sharp left turn at a slow speed is easier than making the same turn to the right.

So, I spend a marginal amount of time in the wee hours of the morning, practicing where folks aint around to gauk at me and, it's a clear parking lot so, I don't bang off the sides of car doors. I've now got it where I can make a complete U-turn from one parking place to the next one, left AND right, without putting my feet down. The more I do this, the more I feel I can manage the weight of the AT at the slowest of speeds, almost walking. I've managed to come to many stop signs and, be completely stopped for a moment, and not put my feet down.

I could never do any of this with my previous bike, the Goldwing. Kind-a fun. This is a massive improvement in handling since I first acquired the AT.
Scott
 

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My wife and I like to use the local high school because they have all the MSF training course lines painted in one area for training. Yeah, people can gawk at you which is a down side, but it is cool to have the lines.

For off road, there are a couple of tracks nearby that have training areas for a small fee. We purchased some of soccer training markers and set them up. They work well because you can run them over if you have to bail without any harm :)

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When I go out on my early morning rides, (around 05:30) , one of my areas to visit is an empty Dillards parking lot. I go on the side of the building so anyone passing by, doesn't get a chance to see this bone head making figure 8's inside parking lot lines. I've been riding for a great deal of time but, have never really mastered the art of might be called close order drill (old military term for you Vets). Like many of you, making a sharp left turn at a slow speed is easier than making the same turn to the right.

So, I spend a marginal amount of time in the wee hours of the morning, practicing where folks aint around to gauk at me and, it's a clear parking lot so, I don't bang off the sides of car doors. I've now got it where I can make a complete U-turn from one parking place to the next one, left AND right, without putting my feet down. The more I do this, the more I feel I can manage the weight of the AT at the slowest of speeds, almost walking. I've managed to come to many stop signs and, be completely stopped for a moment, and not put my feet down.

I could never do any of this with my previous bike, the Goldwing. Kind-a fun. This is a massive improvement in handling since I first acquired the AT.
Scott
That is really good Scott.
55517
 

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Oddly, I don't regret buying my 2019 AT DCT even though I've managed to crash twice when the bike shot forward from walking speed. Both incidents happened so quickly I still don't know exactly what I did wrong, although I suspect it was just being clumsy with the throttle.

One thing that does concern me is that I have heard from various experienced sources that when the rear brake is applied n the DCT the software cuts the power to the throttle significantly. My second incident occurred when I was trying to judge just how much power to give the bike from standstill on a steep hill (my garden path) to get over a very small rut. I had very little margin for error with a wall about 10 feet in front of me (I was trying to turn it at the same time on a hairpin bend). My left foot was down. My right foot was hard on the rear brake. I finally got to what I would have known as 'bite point' on a manual bike, and took my foot all the way off the brake. The bike seemed to fly from under me. Fortunately I was shot off the back of it by the time it hit the wall.

Now I am completely non technical and I'm far from experienced as a biker. Also, I had been away for ten years. On the flip side, my last bike was a 1200GS and I had well over a year on it without a single incident.

Maybe all modern bikes have the power cut by software when the rear brake is applied, I don't know. But if I had known about this feature, I'm pretty sure I wouldn't have ended up with a busted pelvis and broken wrist. I expected the brake to work as a brake - I push the pedal, the pads clamp the disc and hold the bike still until I release the brake. What I find hard to understand is a manufacturer failing to highlight (nor is it mentioned in the manual) that there is another powerful braking mechanism being 'secretly' operated by the software and that there is no gradual release if you come off the pedal immediately, but a sudden return of full power.

That's my story. At the core of it is this software braking assertion; I don't know if it is true and would appreciate your thoughts on it. I was going to write formally to Honda asking them about it, but my bike should be back on the road next week after it's been converted to have the rear brake lever on the left handlebar (the parking brake will be relocated). I intend to carry out several experiments to see if I can replicate that massive power surge and then at least I will know for sure.

EDIT on May 29th 2020
Having the intention as mentioned to get back on the bike I will not now be doing so. The bike was in the garage awaiting a rear brake conversion (to a lever on left handlebar) to increase safety and my confidence. It will now be going back to the dealer. My change of mind was initiated by a post by Double Thumper (linked at foot) describing a very scary incident similar to mine.

After reading that I spent many hours seeking evidence that there was indeed a fault with the DCT model only to find numerous equally scary stories of a THROTTLE. fault. It seems less and less likely to me now that the DCT is to blame, but that is for Honda to investigate.

In non-web investigations I've been told by an industry insider that Honda are aware of the problem as they have refunded or exchanged bikes. This throws a new light on Wee Willy's posts here. I certainly don't want to be an unfortunate but 'necessary' statistic in the progress chart of Honda's (or anyone else's) engineers.

Joe



Best wishes
Joe
I have had a few occasions on DCT bikes where I had an unintended acceleration, one even dumped me in a parking lot. I think I solved it with a DCT reset which may have helped to reestablish a little throttle margin where you can twist the throttle a little before the actual throttle reacts.
 

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My 18 Standard DCT (Bought new last November) has had around 5k of its 7.5k off road and has only had one hiccup when I dumped it in mud. After I got it back on it's feet and fired it up the bike was in 2nd and was trying to kick into neutral but couldn't so I rolled to forward a few inches and it popped into N. I turned it off and then fired it back up and it's been fine.

I was in SoCal a couple years ago in the middle of nowhere SE of Slab City and wiped out in gravel and almost destroyed my knee. If I had, there is no way I could have ridden out with a manual so with the bulk of my riding being done solo in the boonies even if I get pretty messed up, if I can get the bike up and on it I'll be able to ride it out.

It's best to learn to adapt your riding to the DCT instead of trying to mimic manual, IMHO. I was dicking with it constantly after I first got it, then I just adjusted the settings and rode it and found that right about the time I would want to bang into a new gear it would shift. I still play with the triggers mainly to downshift for corners, but am happy with how precisely I can dial it in for specificf conditions with the Post '17 electronics.
 

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In my view there’s pro’s and cons. Yes, at low speed you have to be very very careful. Practice and training perhaps helps. I don’t like not having total control of the engine. You just get use to it. I tend to put mine in N when I stop at lights etc, or keep my foot firmly on the brake. I have grip puppies to increase the grip diameter. They help throttle control.
I can see how people could get into real trouble or even life threatening situations. So easy if you’re tired or distracte.
However, on balance, I think it’s great. Pros outweigh cons. I would buy another.
 
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