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For my two penneth think of low torque values as 'not too tight' because they are set to ensure the clamping force is not too tight. Think of high torques values as 'not too loose' because they are set to ensure the clamping force is tight enough.
 

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I'm wondering if a small washer will alter the position of the bolt enough at tightening to allow it to seat better on the threads now that they may have been slightly over-torqued, or if I'm just looking for trouble.
Your looking for trouble.

If the threads have been damaged they need to be repaired, this is best done using a helicoil thread repair kit, cheap as chips from ebay, Amazon or whatever your prefered source of supply may be. As @yetiboy01 posted

If you do happen to strip the treads its not the end of the world, no need to replace the housing, a cheap helicoil thread insert kit will fix the thread & make the thread stronger than the original, kits come with drill bit, tap, install tool, thread inserts & instructions, you can get them in all sizes to suit what ever you have destroyed 馃槄
 

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...

I'm also wondering why Honda wouldn't include the o-ring in the package with the DCT filter cartridge if its a required replacement part when its changed...I suppose I can guess why :rolleyes:
Somewhere I think it is suggested to replace the DCT filter cover o-ring seal, as needed.

In any case, I have never had a need to replace a DCT filter cover o-ring seal on their NC750X or CRF1000 models. I do reinstall the cover very carefully to avoid pinching it.
 

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2020 CRF1100 - ATAS DCT
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Somewhere I think it is suggested to replace the DCT filter cover o-ring seal, as needed.

In any case, I have never had a need to replace a DCT filter cover o-ring seal on their NC750X or CRF1000 models. I do reinstall the cover very carefully to avoid pinching it.
So I ordered a few of the bolts and a DCT filter O-ring. I took the cover off today and this is what I found - in case anyone is curious鈥.
Auto part Coil spring Household hardware Eyewear Metal


Household hardware Auto part Art Technology Font

I tightened to the spec in the manual and like many others had that 鈥榝eeling鈥. It鈥檚 shocking really, to see threads stretched out of shape like that. New bolt in the middle, originals from the rear side and front side respectively.

Then, looking at the O-ring you can see it was clearly crushed on one side - not pinched or ripped but crushed.
Hopefully this stops the seeping of oil.
 

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So I ordered a few of the bolts and a DCT filter O-ring. I took the cover off today and this is what I found - in case anyone is curious鈥.
View attachment 75133

View attachment 75134
I tightened to the spec in the manual and like many others had that 鈥榝eeling鈥. It鈥檚 shocking really, to see threads stretched out of shape like that. New bolt in the middle, originals from the rear side and front side respectively.

Then, looking at the O-ring you can see it was clearly crushed on one side - not pinched or ripped but crushed.
Hopefully this stops the seeping of oil.
That is indeed extreme. Fortunately a bolt did not snap.
 

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2020 CRF1100 - ATAS DCT
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So after changing the bolts and the o-ring, I expected that the seepage would stop. Unfortunately it has not. When the bike is warm, when I run my finger along the bottom edge of the filter cover, there is a small amount of oil - not enough to drip down, but enough to show up on my finger. After I park the bike and wipe off the oil it doesn't appear again until I run the bike. I was pretty careful to ensure the o-ring wasn't pinched or bent when I replaced it.

Not sure what to do now? I didn't torque it at all - I just made it "tight".... perhaps I need to torque it more? Is there a lot of pressure behind that cover?
 

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If it's still weeping I'd be inclined to give it a nip (1/8 of a turn) and repeat until it no longer weeps. I'm assuming here that it has been assembled correctly with a lubricated 'O' ring, of the correct size, to the specified torque using a reliable wrench. If it feels as if it's been tightened as much as it needs I'd opt for plan B and reassemble using a smear of RTV sealant on both sides of the 'O' ring.

Weeping 'O' rings should not be an insurmountable iproblem.
 

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RTV sealant on both sides of the 'O' ring.

Weeping 'O' rings should not be an insurmountable iproblem.
Watch out for silicone in the product.

Hi, I have some new info.
I just had my tank off to clean out and install the Guglatech, and when I saw the torque spec for the packing was 9 lbf-ft
I said, not this again... I ordered a new wrench because I don't trust the Craftsman one I used to torque the DCT filter bolts. The Craftsman is a 3/8 drive inch lbs (was set to 108, dry threads, held correctly, etc.) So I put my fuel pump back in, torqued the bolts with the new digital 1/4 drive, it become very apparent with the shorter wrench that 9 lbf-ft is a lot of force to be applied to those small DCT filter cover bolts, it makes me cringe thinking about it. when I finished setting the packing bolts with the new wrench, I put the old Craftsman on them out of curiosity, and it clicked right away. :unsure:

View attachment 62350
Dont forget there is a + and - factor with torque wrenches, usually stated. And a 3/8 drive might not be to accurate down low.

A , T handle and socket is useful
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
So after changing the bolts and the o-ring, I expected that the seepage would stop. Unfortunately it has not. When the bike is warm, when I run my finger along the bottom edge of the filter cover, there is a small amount of oil - not enough to drip down, but enough to show up on my finger. After I park the bike and wipe off the oil it doesn't appear again until I run the bike. I was pretty careful to ensure the o-ring wasn't pinched or bent when I replaced it.

Not sure what to do now? I didn't torque it at all - I just made it "tight".... perhaps I need to torque it more? Is there a lot of pressure behind that cover?
I remember seeing this video on the Goldwing forums... there is an alternate O-ring to try if all else fails.
 

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Some folks shouldn't be allowed spanners and some folks shouldn't be allowed to make YouTube 'how to' videos, bear with me here. While this video isn't as bad as many out there, given that it is an 'instructional how to' it should be more factual and less of the authors opinion. Not wanting to be too picky I'll just make comment on whether to use a torque wrench and how to use it.

First off the obvious, manufacturers give torque wrench setting values for a reason, many of those reasons being part of their quality control systems and procedures have little bearing on the real life assembly of parts such as drain bolts, oil filter canisters and cover plates. The salient point here is that many home mechanics rely on those torque wrench settings to be correct but fail to understand the correct assembly requirement which is for those parts (bolts, washers, threads etc.) to be assembled dry, not covered in oil (as in the video).

Here's what many a home mechanic fails to understand. When tightening a bolt the force required to reach a given torque setting is roughly divided as 50% bolt head and washer friction, 35% thread friction and 15% bolt shank distortion. For example tightening a bolt to 12 Nm (9 lbf-ft) the force used is roughly divided as follows

bolt head/washer 6 Nm (4.5 lbf-ft)
thread friction 4.2 Nm (3 lbf-ft)
shank distortion 1.8 Nm (1 lbf-ft)

As a rule of thumb a lubricated bolt, washer or thread can require 25-50% more turning to achieve the same force as a dry part. Which means that an oily bolt tightened to an indicated force of 12 Nm (9 lbf-ft) could actually be being turned to a force equivalent to 24 Nm (18 lbf-ft) more than enough to permanently distort the shank of a M5 bolt!
 

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2016 Honda CRF 1000L Manual
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They are essentially [soft] crush washers and Honda, Yamaha, Aprilia, etc. strongly recommend replacing them after each removal.

I never have in decades of oil changes. But I also don't over-torque the bolt either.
We really only need to install new crush washers in high-pressure environments like brake lines. A low-pressure crankcase shouldn't need a new crush with an oil change unless the mating surfaces are damaged somehow.

Like you, I've never replaced them for an oil change in almost 60 years and have never had a problem.
 
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