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Discussion Starter #1
I am liking the DCT gearbox in general, but I'm really struggling with low speed stuff such as tight U-turns. Never had a problem before on other Adventure bikes, so I am putting it down to the DCT box and the lack of a clutch to modulate speed.
Probably mostly lack of confidence on my part, but I need to get this cracked - do you have any particular techniques that you use? :frown2:
 

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Hi Maxply, I know what you mean as I was a little frustrated with my shoddy u turns etc.
You are dead right it is a lack of clutch confidence thing, the trust the DCT it copes with crawling pace well.
make sure you use the roll on the tyres by leaning it over well keep yourself upright and as keno351 said drag that rear brake a little if you need too it does help.
 

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As Zippyworld says, thats my exact technique. Takes a while to adjust the lack of clutch, but once your use to it, it’s fine.

One thing I don’t understand with Honda, why didn’t they put a rear brake lever on the left handle bar? Makes total sense to me and others alike, especially when you need to keep both feet on the ground, maybe on an incline, but also it would make slow speed manoeuvring a doddle.
 

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I supply ample rear brake (as much as I need) when doing U-turns and slow maneuvers.
Found out that the ECU will slip the clutch if you're on the throttle and braking.
So while everyone says use 'little'; I say use as much as you need.
...
Once you have developed enough finesse with the throttle hand, you will need less braking.
Recently, I have moved onto tight full lock, U-turns using the front brake to turn the wheel even quicker.
aka MotoGymkhana.
Now, the rear brake is almost never used in slow stuff.
 

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shedracer,
Honda did put a rear brake lever on the left side it's called the park brake, not to be used to stop the bike from speed, but works good in slow speed turns [u turns] sharp right hand down hill hair pins [ you can put right foot on ground]you can lock the rear wheel and slide the rear wheel, use it like clutch but in reverse, a ply a little throttle and use the rear hand brake to slow bike down.
I have used it all the the time in slow speed manoeuvring. Try it, if does not work for you don't do it. It is the one of the many advantages of the dct trany.
maxply try it, it may help.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the input. I have tried using the parking brake on difficult uphill re-starts where I need both feet down & as you say it does help. Been out practising U-turns today and starting to see some improvement - will try the parking brake judiciously on U-turns on my next practice session.
 

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Can honestly never say I have ever used the parking break.
mind you my bike sees the muddy stuff as a rare treat, mostly commutes/rides on tarmac.
Will try it on the A414 on run to work tomorrow just to see the looks on car drivers face lol
 

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Can honestly never say I have ever used the parking break.
mind you my bike sees the muddy stuff as a rare treat, mostly commutes/rides on tarmac.
Will try it on the A414 on run to work tomorrow just to see the looks on car drivers face lol
Whenever off tarmac it's a good discipline to get into to use the parking brake. Replicates leaving trail bike in gear.

As has been said...applying rear brake is the way to control low speed manouverability. Watch YouTube videos of the Californian Highway Patrol in their bikes.

Matter of practice.. familiarity with surface, adhesion, degree of brake application...

Over time you can blend with the front brake too...recognising that adhesion and keen angle are important to recognise.

Decent crash bars a good investment before you practice...and maybe try it on dry short soft grass....

Stuart
 

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Five good reasons you should not use the parking brake when there is a proper rear brake:
1. It wasn't designed for it.
2. Has limited braking power
3. The pads wear much quicker
4. May damage the rotor
5. There is a rear brake?
 

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I've tried using gravel mode, it seams to give a softer throttle action. Plenty of practice also improves performance.
 

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As Zippyworld says, thats my exact technique. Takes a while to adjust the lack of clutch, but once your use to it, it’s fine.

One thing I don’t understand with Honda, why didn’t they put a rear brake lever on the left handle bar? Makes total sense to me and others alike, especially when you need to keep both feet on the ground, maybe on an incline, but also it would make slow speed manoeuvring a doddle.
Honda sort of did, its called the park brake lever & it works great, I use it all the time for holding the bike on hills & stop lights with both feet on the ground & works well when you cant get your foot on the rear break for maneuvering.
 

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Five good reasons you should not use the parking brake when there is a proper rear brake:
1. It wasn't designed for it.
2. Has limited braking power
3. The pads wear much quicker
4. May damage the rotor
5. There is a rear brake?

1. We don't know what Honda design engineers had in mind when designing the left brake lever
2. We only need limited breaking power when holding the bike on a hill or trail braking
3. shouldn't effect wear much as the pads look to be made from the same material as the main pads only slightly smaller
4. Only if the pads are worn out, no different to the main brake caliper with worn out pads
5. you cant always get your foot onto the rear brake but you can always get your hand on the brake lever
 

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1. We don't know what Honda design engineers had in mind when designing the left brake lever
2. We only need limited breaking power when holding the bike on a hill or trail braking
3. shouldn't effect wear much as the pads look to be made from the same material as the main pads only slightly smaller
4. Only if the pads are worn out, no different to the main brake caliper with worn out pads
5. you cant always get your foot onto the rear brake but you can always get your hand on the brake lever
You will think differently, after you have some experience changing out worn parking brake pads.
I'm on my third pair and I use the p-brake for just that- parking the bike :surprise:
It's your bike, use whatever brake you like.
 

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Like others said, drag the rear brake a little. I adjusted my pedal to accommodate this easier. Now I can look like the Moto cops on Harley’s in a tight spot.
 

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dctfan, You must have a high mileage parking place, I have just over 42,000kms on my AT and the last time I put a rear tire on I had 75% pad still on the park brake, and 80% pad remaining on the main foot brake. I do ride mainly off road FSR, twin track, of the 42,000 kms about 60-70% off road. Do ride in Idaho, Montana, Washington, Oregon, B.C. and really enjoy my AT dct.
 

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dctfan, You must have a high mileage parking place, I have just over 42,000kms on my AT and the last time I put a rear tire on I had 75% pad still on the park brake, and 80% pad remaining on the main foot brake. I do ride mainly off road FSR, twin track, of the 42,000 kms about 60-70% off road. Do ride in Idaho, Montana, Washington, Oregon, B.C. and really enjoy my AT dct.
My 2016 DCT has about 47k miles (75.6k km), since new.
Brake pads are wear items and less wear just means
they are not being used as much.
.
As much as I would like to preserve pads on the parking brake,
I am on my 3rd set.
If you use it regularly instead of the rear brake, you just
need to change the pads more often- not for me, too much better things to do :)
 

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I've read this concern before and just don't understand it.

The AT DCT was my first bike. There is an advanced riding course in my town taught by police officers that do motorcycle rodeo stuff. They have the course permanently painted in a parking lot nearby.

I took the course on my AT DCT and had no problem with it at all. Others on cruisers (with 20-30 years of experience) were dropping their bikes all over the place during the class.

It includes a lot of the same low speed maneuvers that the competitions do, including low speed weaves, tight figure 8's and the Iron Cross. I find them to be easy on my AT. Periodically, I'll ride over there and run through the course again just to knock the rust off.

Since buying a couple of "clutch" bikes, I have taken them over there and find it more difficult to do the same thing on those bikes. Having to focus on clutch, throttle and braking is much more complicated than just using throttle blips and the occasional brake touch on the DCT.
 

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You're coming at your skills from the opposite direction. All the guys who learned how to feather the clutch to modulate power are having a hard time undoing those habits, which includes me as well.
 
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