Honda Africa Twin Forum banner

21 - 37 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
You will think differently, after you have some experience changing out worn parking brake pads.
I'm on my third pair and I use the p-brake for just that- parking the bike :surprise:
It's your bike, use whatever brake you like.
I must be confused, how do you wear out the parking brake pads if you only use it for parking? No movement should mean no wear? Could it be adjusted too tight? What am I missing? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Ive got over 10,000k's on my park brake pads that get used on every ride for hill holding, trail braking & occasionally used as a park brake, checked them earlier in the week & only half worn at the most, Im very pleased with the wear considering how much I use them
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
361 Posts
Are the parking brake pads not just the second set of pads on the regular rear brakes? I was under the impression that when I used the foot brake I was engaging both sets of pads, which the parking brake engaged just one set.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Are the parking brake pads not just the second set of pads on the regular rear brakes? I was under the impression that when I used the foot brake I was engaging both sets of pads, which the parking brake engaged just one set.
Two separate systems, two separate calipers, two differing operation mechanisms, nothing to do with each other. Foot brake operates rear brake and handlebar lever operates parking brake.

Cheers

Stuart
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Ive got over 10,000k's on my park brake pads that get used on every ride for hill holding, trail braking & occasionally used as a park brake, checked them earlier in the week & only half worn at the most, Im very pleased with the wear considering how much I use them
Hi there. Have you adjusted the lever so it's possible to grab it more easily or do you have very longer fingers?

Sent from my SM-G935W8 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,092 Posts
Hi there. Have you adjusted the lever so it's possible to grab it more easily or do you have very longer fingers?

Sent from my SM-G935W8 using Tapatalk
Yes - I too thought that trail braking with the handbrake would be a good idea, but then couldn't reach the handbrake lever at all easily, and then was worried about the ratchet being triggered and the brake locking on
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
I adjusted the lever so it came back farther before it engaged the brake. I can now partially pull it and get better control of it, but it's not really ideal. I don't believe you'd have a problem with unwanted lock lever engagement--it's a little bit of a pain to get it locked when I want to...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
Ive got over 10,000k's on my park brake pads that get used on every ride for hill holding, trail braking & occasionally used as a park brake, checked them earlier in the week & only half worn at the most, Im very pleased with the wear considering how much I use them
Had a look at my parking brake pads earlier today - quite difficult to get a good look at them to see how much meat there is left on them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
814 Posts
Most training courses in North America now have you learn to have the right foot on the rear brake at stops and on hills rather than both feet on the ground. Then every limb has a job on a manual bike - left hand for clutch, right throttle only, right foot holds you in place and lets you drag the rear brake, and left on the ground for balance. When it's a routine it becomes muscle memory - even loaded and with a passenger - left foot comes down automatically right foot on the brake.

I took a DCT VFR1200X for a ride and honestly didn't have to change anything except my left hand was flipping the gearbox - everything else was the same. No need for the parking brake at all, except to park. :)

You're coming at your skills from the opposite direction. All the guys who learned how to feather the clutch to modulate power are having a hard time undoing those habits, which includes me as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
New to the forum and wanted to thank all the folks that wrote about the slow speed maneuvers. I'm *really* new to motorcycling overall and the AT Adv DCT is my first (probably only/last) bike for years to come. I am really struggling with the slow speed stuff, especially going right for some reason. I'll practice what you've all mentioned with the rear brake/gravel mode! Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
I did a course, during which we did some low-speed manoeuvres in a car park area. I touched the front brakes a couple of times, not a good idea. Using the rear brakes and leaning the bike (while staying more upright myself) and the DCT bike really does a great job of tight turns. As a bonus, I never stalled the bike once!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Most training courses in North America now have you learn to have the right foot on the rear brake at stops and on hills rather than both feet on the ground. Then every limb has a job on a manual bike - left hand for clutch, right throttle only, right foot holds you in place and lets you drag the rear brake, and left on the ground for balance. When it's a routine it becomes muscle memory - even loaded and with a passenger - left foot comes down automatically right foot on the brake.

I took a DCT VFR1200X for a ride and honestly didn't have to change anything except my left hand was flipping the gearbox - everything else was the same. No need for the parking brake at all, except to park. :)
Also, the right foot is on the rear brake for a good reason. I've seen riders sit at the lights holding the bike on the front brake only, both feet down. If they are rear ended, with the front wheel locked like that the nose will dip, it will tend to lift the rear of the bike up off the ground and flip the rider off up in the air and over the front into the junction. Hold the bike on the rear brake goes a long way to stopping the bike flipping the rider off as the bike tends to shunt forwards rather that do a flip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,092 Posts
Also, the right foot is on the rear brake for a good reason. I've seen riders sit at the lights holding the bike on the front brake only, both feet down. If they are rear ended, with the front wheel locked like that the nose will dip, it will tend to lift the rear of the bike up off the ground and flip the rider off up in the air and over the front into the junction. Hold the bike on the rear brake goes a long way to stopping the bike flipping the rider off as the bike tends to shunt forwards rather that do a flip.
I've seen this argument lots of times (almost always coming from stateside). Is this a common occurrence over in the USA? I have been riding for over 50 years and have never heard of such a thing happening in the UK.
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
It would be very, very rare, if it happens at all. If I hold the front brake at a light, I don't keep a death grip on it. A rear impact would make the tire slide or the brake slip before it picked up a 500-pound bike, and almost certainly make me release my grip as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
At course we learned with low speed manoeuvres like driving a 8 that you must use your rear break and a little bit throttle on a fixed postion. And with a DCT it works perfect because you don’t have a clutch your rear brake will do this for you.
 
21 - 37 of 37 Posts
Top