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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys,

Been snooping the site for many months now and gathered lots of information, that now has got me to the point of pulling the trigger on the AT, but having tested both the DCT and Manual,I am undecided which way to swing, i feel i may be getting sucked in with the DCT because its a new way for me to ride a motorcycle and it could be a novelty thing, that could wear off in a few months, leaving me with the feeling i should have went manual. I am sure there are a few of you out there that had the same concern, i would like to hear from some of you that did, and are you happy with the decision, or even someone who may have bought the DCT and went back and got a manual.

I have been riding bike most of my life, been through every type of bike from street to dirt to cruiser to classic, starting to slow things down, I currently ride a triumph T120 Bonnie, but since the launch of the AT I have always liked the bike, but of course they dont make it easy by giving the two options, now my head is spinning, the bike would be used 80% road 20% logging roads. so guys any advice would be welcome.

Thanks in advance for your comments, this forum has been a wealth of knowledge to me and great for me to get to the decision to where I am at today.

Thanks
stewart
 

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DCT is the way to go

Guys,

Been snooping the site for many months now and gathered lots of information, that now has got me to the point of pulling the trigger on the AT, but having tested both the DCT and Manual,I am undecided which way to swing, i feel i may be getting sucked in with the DCT because its a new way for me to ride a motorcycle and it could be a novelty thing, that could wear off in a few months, leaving me with the feeling i should have went manual. I am sure there are a few of you out there that had the same concern, i would like to hear from some of you that did, and are you happy with the decision, or even someone who may have bought the DCT and went back and got a manual.

I have been riding bike most of my life, been through every type of bike from street to dirt to cruiser to classic, starting to slow things down, I currently ride a triumph T120 Bonnie, but since the launch of the AT I have always liked the bike, but of course they dont make it easy by giving the two options, now my head is spinning, the bike would be used 80% road 20% logging roads. so guys any advice would be welcome.

Thanks in advance for your comments, this forum has been a wealth of knowledge to me and great for me to get to the decision to where I am at today.

Thanks
stewart



Stewart,
I have a 6 speed manual 2006 Honda CBR1000RR and a 2004 Ducati St4s ABS and I have much more fun with my DCT Africa Twin.
The only drawback I can think of is being able to use the clutch for low speed maneuvering with the manual transmission bikes, that all. You can put the DCT in manual mode and it's faster than a standard transmission bike when you shift it up or down with the triggers. the shifts are super fast and it's faster than a manual because of the quickness of the shifts. You can put it in 1 of 3 sport modes and let it shift for you and gear down for you in whichever level of aggressiveness you want, it's amazing Or you can just put it in normal drive mode for more conservative shifting and gearing down and this selection gives you your best gas mileage....the DCT is amazing and you have so many selections you can make. No matter what mode you're in you can over ride the auto shift with the triggers just by pressing them to gear down or upshift...it's an incredible transmission. Honestly I have more fun with it than a standard and if you want to relax on a ride you can't beat it....If you have a cup holder you can even have a coffee while you're driving. I don't but you can if you want...I hope this helps you make a decision. To me I wish I had that tranny on my CBR1000RR....Paul.


PS: It's worth every penny for the DCT option. The only people that don't like it are people who don't know how to use it and how much it can add to your riding experience. Those are the people who just put in the eco drive mode and don't use all the sports modes and manual shift mode which are a lot of fun.
 

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I have never regretted my DCT AT purchase.
Love it and would do it again.
Have had many bikes over the years: sport, cruiser, dual sport, etc.
The DCT AT is by far my favorite.
 

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Love mine, took a bit of getting used to, at the start I was reaching for the clutch & gear lever but you soon get used to it, I mainly use sport 1 around town & sport 3 everywhere else except for rough enduro trails when I want to hold it in 1st gear Ill use manual mode, its great not having to worry about stalling in the rough stuff, you can concentrate on where you are going instead of having to slip the clutch & not stall the big girl, with a 240kg bike that is a huge bonus & saves a lot of falls. around town at the stop lights is another place the DCT shines, no slipping the clutch, just nail the throttle & your gone, no one beats you off from the lights & that includes the 150 - 200hp sport bikes unless they are using launch control, not bad from a mild 1000cc bike. as long as you have an open mind & give it a few rides to get used to it I think most people would be impressed, most of the haters of them commenting have never ridden them
 

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Both are great. A few weeks ago I rode a 60k/37m mountain pass in the wet and probably changed from 2nd to 3rd and back hundreds of times. That was when I thought "I shoulda got the DCT" But I still love the manual. You can't go wrong.
 

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The thing that sold me on the AT was it's DCT. If Honda only offered the AT with a manual transmission I would have bought a KTM most likely. The DCT works great and in S3 mode and shifts just like I normally would using a clutch, both up and down shifting. Very slick.
 
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I’m glad I chose the DCT, no regrets. For me it brings simplicity and mindfulness to riding. No more worries about poor shifts or stalling or getting in the wrong gear etc. because even with years of riding on different types of bikes those shifting blunders still happen. After two years of thinking about it and reading all the reviews that I could find I didn’t see any real negatives to DCT, just a lot of advantages. I waited for the 2018 because of the new electronics and problem fixes.
 

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Yesterday I was out riding on some very tight and twisty roads, I believe that you get better power from a DCT AT than the manual version. With the large number of gear changes on the ride, my DCT didn't once feel like it was in the wrong gear, but if I was on a manual bike I am sure I would have found myself in too high a gear and therefore have worse power. DCT is just better at gear changing than most humans and being in the right gear equals having better power.

Apart from having better power by being in the right gear, riding the tight twisties on a DCT allows you to concentrate more on riding, rather than gear changing. I find that riding the DCT is more enjoyable and fun without being distracted by working a clutch lever and gear lever. I don't have to move my foot about while riding through corners or change hand pressure on the bars to operate a clutch. I sometimes use the upshift/downshift buttons, but mostly I just use S1, S2 or S3 and let the bike handle gear selection.

After ~7 months / ~5,500km of owning my DCT bike I'm loving it, no regrets and my left hand doesn't reach for the non-existent clutch lever any more. My opinion is that you should get the DCT version.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks to everyone for there valued feedback, all great comments, CRider made a comment that has also got me thinking, I have the choice just now of picking 2017 or 2018, of course the 2017 is more attractive, due to the discounted price ($1800 less than the 2018) it really doesn't matter to me that within a few months the 2017 will be technically be a 2 year old bike.
 

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No regrets for not buying a DCT, it never crossed my mind when I considered an AT.
I enjoy the feeling of being at one with my bike even after 51yrs of riding, which for me includes gear shifting.
My guess is the mystery that DCT owners will always have after fitting a Power Commander or similar or a remap and not being able to check the results with a readout from a dyno.
Made a few mods to my manual since I bought it and have to say it still floats my boat.
 

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4800 miles with the DCT. Its what sold me on the bike in the first place as something new and interesting. I made the right decision imo.

DCT is not perfect though. For the most part, with 4 auto modes it will closely match your style of shifting gears. If you override any of the auto modes with a few manual shifts it gets in "mood". Then it won't switch gears on its own until it computes you have turned control back over to it. Just a temporary thing and has never stopped me from doing it. You will never miss a gear, hit a false neutral or stall the bike, definite positives. I have on occasion hit the wrong shift button and downshifted when I meant to upshift, now thats an unexpected surprise. Over a year in and I am still working on DCT slow speed maneuvers aka feathering the rear brake. It take awhile to overcome 30 yrs of habit, but that's fine too. WOT upshifts are the greatest thing ever and always make me grin.

Everything is a tradeoff in some way. You will love whatever you pick. DCT folks love their bikes and so do the ones who ride the manuals. Just get out there and ride is all I'm sayin.
 

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The ATAS DCT (my only experience of DCT) doesn't need manual shifts to learn your riding mood as it seems to respond to throttle rate of change and brake effort. I had a number of instances of being in D mode and due to using the throttle and brakes in a sporty manner its dropped gears and held on to those gears longer than when your using the throttle brakes in a more sedate manner. Its even dropped a few gears rapidly that resulted in a lift of the front wheel (moderate rise not a huge minger) . It responds faster when in the other S modes but it will still pick its skirts up in D when provoked. Ps my only gripe with DCT is manuvering from a stop/slow speed in awkward situations where full lock is needed and its difficult to get a foot on the rear brake as its needed for a dab/paddle . Once theres enough gyroscopic forces to give the bike some balance its not a problem , I think a left bar rear brake would address this issue shame Honda didn't fit one that was usable in that env as the park brake would need to be tweaked to act as that lhs rear brake (its lever position and brake effort not quite up to snuff to be used like that).
 

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No regrets for not buying a DCT, it never crossed my mind when I considered an AT.
I enjoy the feeling of being at one with my bike even after 51yrs of riding, which for me includes gear shifting.
My guess is the mystery that DCT owners will always have after fitting a Power Commander or similar or a remap and not being able to check the results with a readout from a dyno.
Made a few mods to my manual since I bought it and have to say it still floats my boat.
Its not hard to dyno a DCT, just need a spare speed sensor temporarily mounted to pick up the rear wheel speed
to trick the ecu that the front wheel is turning
 

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I've ridden both a bunch and own a DCT.

It can sound unappealing or like a scooter at first, but it really isn't. It's a big jump up like ABS and traction control were big jumps up in their areas. From a comfort, reliability, ease of use, and probably safety point of view, I think its superior to my skills with a manual. It's not perfect, theres a couple 'gotchas' that surprise you the first time, but you learn to adjust and avoid. A good example is pushing the bike while it tries to dig its way out of sand. I had it tip towards me and I accidentally gave it more gas than I meant and couldn't us a manual clutch to cut power. It was manageable (I cut throttle), but was a surprise the first time.

I find the DCT doesn't rob the bike of character or reduce performance. I run it in Touring on road and Sport 3 offroad. You can also shift at will, and its very good, especially the autoblipper on downshifts (on 2018 models). If anything it encourages me to use the throttle with much more finesse and learn to control the bike with the rear brake instead of the clutch. I like that it is so different, and it works really well in this application; "Ride Anywhere".

I'm happy with my DCT.
 

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Its not hard to dyno a DCT, just need a spare speed sensor temporarily mounted to pick up the rear wheel speed
to trick the ecu that the front wheel is turning
Interesting to know that would work, perhaps needs putting up in a "sticky" thread so DCT owners are aware of it.
 

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Have a VFR1200x DCT (2016) and now an ATAS DCT. The DCT is easy to use right away, but it takes a long time to master. There is a lot to learn (fun learning:)
DCT all the way!
 

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Your point about using the rear brake is a major one! Thankfully the AT has a good rear brake.

I've ridden both a bunch and own a DCT.

It can sound unappealing or like a scooter at first, but it really isn't. It's a big jump up like ABS and traction control were big jumps up in their areas. From a comfort, reliability, ease of use, and probably safety point of view, I think its superior to my skills with a manual. It's not perfect, theres a couple 'gotchas' that surprise you the first time, but you learn to adjust and avoid. A good example is pushing the bike while it tries to dig its way out of sand. I had it tip towards me and I accidentally gave it more gas than I meant and couldn't us a manual clutch to cut power. It was manageable (I cut throttle), but was a surprise the first time.

I find the DCT doesn't rob the bike of character or reduce performance. I run it in Touring on road and Sport 3 offroad. You can also shift at will, and its very good, especially the autoblipper on downshifts (on 2018 models). If anything it encourages me to use the throttle with much more finesse and learn to control the bike with the rear brake instead of the clutch. I like that it is so different, and it works really well in this application; "Ride Anywhere".

I'm happy with my DCT.
 
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