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What does the DCT do when the bike hits a bump (such as a rock or curb) that brings the bike to a complete stop?

I haven't seen any DCT description that answers that question.

With a normal automatic transmission, like in a car, there is a liquid-coupled torque converter, so the wheels can slow down or stop while the engine is still running and in gear. With a manual transmission, the engine will stall unless the operator immediately disengages the clutch.

What happens on the DCT? Does it stall? Or immediately shift into neural? Something else?

And what happens when you are trying to go over a bump from a standstill? With a manual transmission, you simultaneously rev the engine while slowly engaging the clutch. With a regular automatic, you just rev the engine until enough torque is being applied to the wheels to get them to move. Since the DCT doesn't use a torque converter, is it able to slowly engage the clutch?

If anyone knows, I would appreciate some enlightenment!
 

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Not having hit a rock or curb I can't answer absolutely definitively but from a couple of test rides...

If there is no throttle applied and there is an obstruction or the brakes are on it will tend to disengage the clutch - it will always do whatever is necessary to not stall the engine. It doesn't change into neutral unless you turn the ignition off as far as I know.

If you then apply throttle it will start to engage the clutch - if the obstruction is insurmountable then you could end up frying the clutch I imagine (or spinning the back wheel if there's little traction).

It basically seems to work like a normal clutch only, unlike me, it won't ever let the engine stall!
 

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Hmm ...should make for some interesting "throttle pinned open" incidents. Best to familiarize yourself with that kill switch ;-)
 

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You can test that scenario in a safe and controlled manner.
Put the front wheel against a wall/rock or tree. Then put TC off and give it a fist full of throttle.
The rear will spin, once you give it enough gas to overcome the
friction of the rear tire.
I recommend you do this on dirt.
You may get the gopro ready as it could become interesting, fast :)

Meanwhile, the clutch acts as it is programmed: it'll engage and turn the rear wheel.
 

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I have a scenario that I still haven't worked out a way of dealing with. Last winter I was driving on icy roads - cars had packed the snow down and turned it glassy so it was very very slippery. The AT (DCT) did an admirable job of staying upright and of course I was riding very delicately. However, when I came to a full stop at traffic lights - particularly if I was on a slight uphill slope - the back wheel always spun when I tried to move away - no matter how carefully I tried to use the throttle. the TC was on the default position, and the whole thing was pretty dangerous and I nearly went down a couple of times in front of cars that were waiting patiently behind me.
I would have thought the TC would have killed the power to the back wheel as soon as it started spinning but it did not seem to. I think I managed to get going each time by fishtailing until the bike started moving forwards - but I was very lucky.
Mike
 

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TC has to have a threshold beyond which it won't cut power, otherwise you'd never be able get going when the traction is zero. Imagine being stuck in deep slippery mud; the situation is the same. You're a better man than I to go out on ice-covered roads, in traffic, BTW.
 

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TC has to have a threshold beyond which it won't cut power, otherwise you'd never be able get going when the traction is zero. Imagine being stuck in deep slippery mud; the situation is the same. You're a better man than I to go out on ice-covered roads, in traffic, BTW.
wasnt by choice shadowjack. Got caught out touring in Germany in worsening conditions. And yes I see what you mean on the TC
Mike
 
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