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Having ridden my DCT version for a few months i now see the good and bad parts of the system, no one could fault the system when on the open roads etc but it is lacking for control at low speed when you would use the clutch to take speed off, It first came up going down a cart track which was well maintained very slowly when starting to lose a bit control i would have normally pulled a clutch to regain control however with DCT i did not have the option, if the bike surges forward only marginally then the reaction of your body is to lean back which rotates your accelerator hand and the bike does the opposite of slowing down. Although i didn't come off it was a close shave which i have had a few times.
Any hints or tips
 

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Welcome to the Forum @wyrmat1.

Certainly many riders have to adapt their expectations to the control of the AT augmented by the DCT. For example: I typically have my engine braking parameter set to "2" (middle-of-the-road kinda setting), and down shift manually, when required (no throttle). I don't always have to do this, but sometimes I wish for more scrubbing for the situation before me than the DCT plans. I have adapted my behaviour to this, for example.

I don't experience "surging" during down shifting. That would kinda irk me - I think.
 

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Hi and welcome...
Yes it is a learning curve and suddenly control is all in your right hand (throttle)
But it is what it is. Good off-road for most situations but never will be as good as a clutch.
 
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Well,
I guess I just haven't had all that much of an issue adapting to the DCT operation after about 45+ years of manual shifting motorcycle riding. Honda, apparently in its efforts to assist in helping riders adapt to the DCT, gave us many different selections for the DCT operations. I use just a couple of them for my methods of riding. I use both the D mode and the S mode for the automatic operations and, on rare occasions, will push the M button just because, for those particular time(s) when I just feel like I'd like to decide when and where I want either to upshift or downshift. But,, again, those are few and far between when I chose those times for M operation.

I guess I've just not really learned or adapted to the use of the clutch for speed control. I figure that's what the throttle's for. So far, the only Freudian slips I do in really rare situations are to attempt to lightly grab the clutch handle to shut down my cruise control. I don't have a CLUTCH HANDLE!!!! Oh well, this 67 year old mind will maybe, eventually learn to be 100% of the DCT ops.
Scott
 

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Well,
I guess I just haven't had all that much of an issue adapting to the DCT operation after about 45+ years of manual shifting motorcycle riding. Honda, apparently in its efforts to assist in helping riders adapt to the DCT, gave us many different selections for the DCT operations. I use just a couple of them for my methods of riding. I use both the D mode and the S mode for the automatic operations and, on rare occasions, will push the M button just because, for those particular time(s) when I just feel like I'd like to decide when and where I want either to upshift or downshift. But,, again, those are few and far between when I chose those times for M operation.

I guess I've just not really learned or adapted to the use of the clutch for speed control. I figure that's what the throttle's for. So far, the only Freudian slips I do in really rare situations are to attempt to lightly grab the clutch handle to shut down my cruise control. I don't have a CLUTCH HANDLE!!!! Oh well, this 67 year old mind will maybe, eventually learn to be 100% of the DCT ops.
Scott
For me it’s missing some control over what I can (usually) do with the front wheel with ease on a manual. Popping and sliding it.
Pop the clutch and jump the front wheel over pretty much anything, log, ditch, rock is not even a thought for me on a clutch bike, AT DCT whole different game, yea I know pretty much when and what RPM”s and gear I can get it to come up, but how high is another story. On a clutch doing that 99% of the time I would be grabbing clutch to keep the wheel from coming to high. Tho I will say as of yet I have not hand an issue with sliding the front tire over either way, once it’s up off the ground I can drop it down to the left or right 4-5” without issue.
Just the other day coming home from work I took a left onto a street I rarely go on, setting first at a red light waiting to make a hard left, when I did I was hoonigan it a little and as a result when I was about 3/4 way through the turn I was still in 1st gear and up around 4K that’s when I noticed the 1ft wide pot hole my front tire was about to enjoy, I blipped the throttle and she gleefully responded by bringing up the front wheel enough that I could drag the front tire to the left about 4” and it avoided the hole.
Point being; I immediately thought hmm good thing I had the rpm range to do that...
But had I been on a bike with a clutch, I wouldn’t of gave it any thought, other than friggin pothole.
 
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Having ridden my DCT version for a few months i now see the good and bad parts of the system, no one could fault the system when on the open roads etc but it is lacking for control at low speed when you would use the clutch to take speed off, It first came up going down a cart track which was well maintained very slowly when starting to lose a bit control i would have normally pulled a clutch to regain control however with DCT i did not have the option, if the bike surges forward only marginally then the reaction of your body is to lean back which rotates your accelerator hand and the bike does the opposite of slowing down. Although i didn't come off it was a close shave which i have had a few times.
Any hints or tips
I rode many sections on the Trans America Trail and Utah where the scenario you describe comes into play.
Best tip would be to use brakes more in lieu of the clutch.
Also, it helps more to keep rpm slightly above idle (don't shut it off) to keep engine braking active.
Sometimes you find yourself going downhill faster than your comfort level but as long as you remain balanced and in control
it's all good.
 
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