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Discussion Starter #1
The oil change.

I used the owners manual which gives a brief overview of how to check and change the oil. It says to remove the skid plate but doesn't show how. Its easy to figure out but again, just an overview. Here is a write up, pics are included on my blog (link in sig.)...It's late and I'm too lazy to link all the pics atm.

1.Tools.

5mm Allen head socket or wrench
12mm socket
Short extension
Socket wrench
Oil pan
Funnel
Oil. 4.4qt DCT, 4.3qt Manual (I use Honda GN4 10W-30 Sj)
Oil filter (15410-MFJD01)
(2) Sealing washer for 12mm drain bolts.

2. Skid plate removal.

Using the 5mm Allen remove the two bolts at the front of the plate facing the front wheel. The plate will pivot a little and you can now see that there is one rear bolt near the left foot peg and a peg on the frame facing inward which the right rear of the plate slides on to. Remove the foot peg side bolt and slide the plate off the peg.

3. Drain oil.

Remove two 12mm bolts from the crank case. Order of removal does not matter. You will need a bigger oil pan to catch both streams at once so if using a smaller pan only drain one at a time. If you do not have a center stand I suggest holding the bike in a straight up position to drain the most amount of oil out of the case. Once oil is drained from the case replace the sealing washers on the bolts and tighten the 12mm bolts (22 lbs/ft) and move the oil pan under the filter. Remove the filter and let the oil drain, holding the bike straight up again for a little bit.

4. Replace filter.

Lubricate the oil filter gasket by using some fresh oil on the tip of your finger. Honda suggests torquing to 19 lbs/ft but I'm assuming most won't have the special cap tool for the filter so spin on the filter and tighten until it is very snug.

5. Fill with oil.

Remove the oil fill plug and fit funnel into fill hole. For the DCT you will fill 4.4qt and for the Manual you will fill 4.3qt. The qt size bottle of the Honda oil has delineations of 200mL. 1 qt is 946 mL so you can roughly use the mL numbers to get a closer idea of what .4 and .3 of a qt is. 0.4 qt will be roughly 375mL and 0.3 qt will be roughly 285mL, round those off as you see fit. Once you've added the correct amount of oil replace the fill plug.

6. Check the oil level.

While on the side stand star the bike and let it idle for 3-5m. Switch off the engine and wait 2-3 minutes. Move the bike into an upright position (center stand, or second person needed). Remove the dipstick and wipe it clean with a lint free rag. Insert the dipstick until it seats but don't screw it in. Check that the oil level is between the upper and lower level marks. Replace dipstick and screw it back in tightly.

Go for a ride!
 

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Oil Filter

Do you happen to have a part # for your oil filter. My dealer was having a hard time looking it up. They couldn't find me a shop manual either.
 

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Interesting - I thought idling whilst on the centre-stand was better than idling on the side-stand? I'm sure this was the case 10 years or so ago as I was advised to not start my R1 and leave it ticking over on the side-stand - sit on it and hold it level said the mechanic. Presumably this avoids oil migrating to the lower side.
 

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Dear Superhatch,
I thought that a DCT has 2 oil filters, the one you describe and one for the clutches (the clutch oil filter). This one sits on the right side of the engine and is fixed with two small bolts and a cover. The filter is behind that cover. The filter is rather small.
Best wishes
L Coudert
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Do you happen to have a part # for your oil filter. My dealer was having a hard time looking it up. They couldn't find me a shop manual either.
It's listed in the tool section. My parts guy referred to it as the "standard" screw on Honda filter.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Dear Superhatch,
I thought that a DCT has 2 oil filters, the one you describe and one for the clutches (the clutch oil filter). This one sits on the right side of the engine and is fixed with two small bolts and a cover. The filter is behind that cover. The filter is rather small.
Best wishes
L Coudert
You are 100% correct. They didn't have that part in yet. :(

Once it arrives I'll update with that section as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Interesting - I thought idling whilst on the centre-stand was better than idling on the side-stand? I'm sure this was the case 10 years or so ago as I was advised to not start my R1 and leave it ticking over on the side-stand - sit on it and hold it level said the mechanic. Presumably this avoids oil migrating to the lower side.
Maybe the sump has changed to allow for that with the assumption that most people will be starting their bike while on the side stand? That bit came right out of the manual so I just followed their lead.
 

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Dear Superhatch,
I thought that a DCT has 2 oil filters, the one you describe and one for the clutches (the clutch oil filter). This one sits on the right side of the engine and is fixed with two small bolts and a cover. The filter is behind that cover. The filter is rather small.
Best wishes
L Coudert
You are correct. We can even buy them at eBay.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-x-original-HONDA-Olfilter-Kupplungsolfilter-CRF1000-SD-04-Africa-Twin-/222094352047?hash=item33b5dadeaf:g:fhgAAOSw~oFXGcYM
 

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Do you guys care to guess why there is a second filter on the DCT?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I don't know how to edit (usually it's a big button somewhere) so I'll just post here. Blog is updated with photos:

7. Replace DCT clutch filter.

Remove the clutch filter cover noted below. This will require a 5mm Allen, or the under-seat Allen. There are two bolts to remove.

Once the bolts are removed you will see a spring seated in the filter. Pull out the spring and set aside for the new filter.

Using a pick or small flat head screw driver remove the filter. It should take very little effort to get the filter out, you don't need to wedge anything in to pry it out. Alternatively perhaps a needle nose pliers used in the spring hole and opened up might also work.

Push in the new filter. Replace the O-ring on the cover (I don't have a part number for that one, they just threw it in the box) and screw down the bolts to 9 ft/lbs.

Now go for a ride!

Edit: I can edit this post but not the OP. Odd.
 

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I typed out 4 guesses but they all sounded lame. :grin2:

Care to clue us in?
My best guess: to catch whatever the main oil filter let through.
The DCT oil path includes the clutch oil pump, several EOP sensors and linear solenoid valves which are more sensitive to debris that don't affect the other tranny parts which may be the source of such debris.
 

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Thank you for the nice write up!

I just changed mine after 60 fun lovin' miles and was amazed at the amount of metal flakes. Glad to have those gone.
 

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Here are the part numbers needed for changing the oil on your AT, the service manual part number is in the back of your owners manual


15010-MCE-H51 oil filter and cup wrench

15410-MFJ-D01 oil filter

15412-MGS-D21 clutch filter

94109-12000 washer
 

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I'm on my 4th oil change so far...

.. something very very unfortunate happened on the third in Idaho involving my forks.

Guesses win a bottle of used degreaser.
 

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What's the answer? Some time has passed and no responses. I don't know, but am curious


I'm on my 4th oil change so far...

.. something very very unfortunate happened on the third in Idaho involving my forks.

Guesses win a bottle of used degreaser.
 

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I'm actually reticent about finishing my blog because I want more adventure and am stuck back at the grind of life. I should just get on with it.

After doing an oil change in Mississippi myself (where the previous official Honda dealer mechanic had over tightened the filter), my adventure buddy and I arrived in Boise, Idaho (after riding off-road all the way from Colorado) and his DRZ400 needed a very special part to fix it.

We rolled into the biggest Suzuki and Honda shop in town and they kindly agreed to remove parts off their showroom DRZ to get us on the way. So I thought; I don't need an oil change but I might as well have one as I'm at a Honda dealer.

They fixed the DRZ (the thing was leaking like a chocolate teapot) and Ginko (my Africa Twin) was rolled out all fresh of oil.

I was leading us out of town and a mile down the road I hear panicked "sh*t, sh*t, sh*t, there is smoke pouring out of your bike" from Adam over the intercom. We were approaching an intersection and I just managed to avoid the stopped cars and cross three lanes of traffic to get to the curb. There was a three hundred foot long oil slick on the road.

Oil had jetted out of the filter all over my front wheel, brakes, forks, engine, radiator and made its way over pretty much everything. The idiot mechanic had made the schoolboy error of not removing the oil seal from the engine so I was left with two, the new and old.

I called the dealer who sent a reluctant kid with a trailer who was more used to strapping down MX bikes so I had to get busy with a load of my straps and some random cardboard.

I had to ride all the way through the rest of Idaho and Oregon with glazed front brakes because there were no brake pads in Idaho (the AT was still brand new then) AND they must have jet washed my fork seals with degreaser to get all that oil off because the next day the forks started to leak.

I managed to clean the fork seals enough for them to stop leaking with a tool made from a McDonald's cup and the dealer found me some front brake pads and sent them to my final motel on the Oregon coast where I changed them. A lovely dealer in Victoria (BC) changed the fork seals and oil and managed to clean the remaining mud caked oil off.

Conclusion: don't trust dealer workshops unless you have experience. This was the only time I had let my bike out of my sight and bad things happened.
 

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Sorry that happened to you. But a good cautionary tale for the rest of us...

I'm actually reticent about finishing my blog because I want more adventure and am stuck back at the grind of life. I should just get on with it.

After doing an oil change in Mississippi myself (where the previous official Honda dealer mechanic had over tightened the filter), my adventure buddy and I arrived in Boise, Idaho (after riding off-road all the way from Colorado) and his DRZ400 needed a very special part to fix it.

We rolled into the biggest Suzuki and Honda shop in town and they kindly agreed to remove parts off their showroom DRZ to get us on the way. So I thought; I don't need an oil change but I might as well have one as I'm at a Honda dealer.

They fixed the DRZ (the thing was leaking like a chocolate teapot) and Ginko (my Africa Twin) was rolled out all fresh of oil.

I was leading us out of town and a mile down the road I hear panicked "sh*t, sh*t, sh*t, there is smoke pouring out of your bike" from Adam over the intercom. We were approaching an intersection and I just managed to avoid the stopped cars and cross three lanes of traffic to get to the curb. There was a three hundred foot long oil slick on the road.

Oil had jetted out of the filter all over my front wheel, brakes, forks, engine, radiator and made its way over pretty much everything. The idiot mechanic had made the schoolboy error of not removing the oil seal from the engine so I was left with two, the new and old.

I called the dealer who sent a reluctant kid with a trailer who was more used to strapping down MX bikes so I had to get busy with a load of my straps and some random cardboard.

I had to ride all the way through the rest of Idaho and Oregon with glazed front brakes because there were no brake pads in Idaho (the AT was still brand new then) AND they must have jet washed my fork seals with degreaser to get all that oil off because the next day the forks started to leak.

I managed to clean the fork seals enough for them to stop leaking with a tool made from a McDonald's cup and the dealer found me some front brake pads and sent them to my final motel on the Oregon coast where I changed them. A lovely dealer in Victoria (BC) changed the fork seals and oil and managed to clean the remaining mud caked oil off.

Conclusion: don't trust dealer workshops unless you have experience. This was the only time I had let my bike out of my sight and bad things happened.
 

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Bloody ****,u send yr bike to a main dealer exspecting the best and professional service and u get amateur work done and get ripped off for the pleasure ??
 
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