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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just spent an hour or so fitting my Ohlins rear shock on my 2016 manual. Removed rear wheel and the longest part of the job is wriggling the OEM rear shock out the available space. A little tip to give a little more wriggle room is to wind the preload adjuster fully out which allows you to clear the swing arm a doddle.
Tried to fit the new shock on my own but promised the missus a cup of char if she'd offer up the top bolt as it's difficult to guide the piped preload adjuster and the shock as well as offer the top bolt into the hole all at the same time. New shock pops in no problem and I owe the girlie a cuppa.
First time I've needed to remove the shock on this bike and if I'm honest it's a great deal easier than on many I've done in the past.
Reason I decided to upgrade after 10,000 miles is that the preload adjuster had seized and the bike was feeling like a motorboat when on the gas because correct sag was unachievable.
Drink my tea and go and set the sag now.
Would go for a test ride but the wind is so strong here at the moment it's making my ear minge whistle.
 

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worth knowing about the top end issues with the new shock. My OEM shock seems OK even after two UK winters and 24k miles which is a little surprising as the front brakes have seized up with the salt a few times, but the rear preload still seems to turn OK.
A useful tip to working on your own possibly. When I changed the shock on my NC750 X DCT - I put the handbrake on and was able to use a scissor car jack under the middle of the tyre to gently ease the swingarm up to exactly the right point for the lower bolt to slide in.
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
worth knowing about the top end issues with the new shock. My OEM shock seems OK even after two UK winters and 24k miles which is a little surprising as the front brakes have seized up with the salt a few times, but the rear preload still seems to turn OK.
A useful tip to working on your own possibly. When I changed the shock on my NC750 X DCT - I put the handbrake on and was able to use a scissor car jack under the middle of the tyre to gently ease the swingarm up to exactly the right point for the lower bolt to slide in.
Mike
I bought the bike last year with 4000 miles on it with one previous owner who had it serviced 3 times in the 2+ years he owned it, had new OEM Dunlops fitted and to be fair it was immaculate, but I'd hazard a guess that he'd never played with the suspension since new as it was almost impossible to alter the preload without using grips on the adjuster knob. I put 6000 miles on it in a few months and the sag had altered in that time so either a new spring or shock would be needed in the near future, fortunately for me a very nice chap on here, Paul B, had his next to new one up for sale and I bought it with a massive saving against new.
The rear wheel, tyre and swingarm weigh more than a small country and looking at the fixed preload adjuster, my guess was that as much swingarm movement as possible would be needed to take out the shock without swingarm removal and so it turned out.
One of the easiest rear wheels on the planet to remove/replace in minutes without having to disturb chain adjustment, so a no brainer to make things easier.
I tend to stand back when I'm working on a new bike for the first time and try to avoid the pitfalls we all went through with spanners when we were younger.
 

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Hi.
Just got myself a ohlins shock, fitting at the weekend, I read on the instructions to give the shock a small amount of compression before tightening the bolts up, is this something you did and if so how did you achive this.
Thanks Paul.
 

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I put a new ohlins shock on since the original shock was shot after the first year. The ohlins shock is much better, especially when riding two up.

The shock is really easy to replace with the bike on the center stand. Just take out the upper and lower shock bolts, lift up the rear wheel and the shock will come right out. No need to remove the rear wheel.
 
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