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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've heard others mention the abrupt on/off throttle response at low speed as well as throttle hand numbness sometimes extending up into the arms and shoulders - just general discomfort and awkward throttle control. I had severe issues with both, even with Rox risers and grip puppies. No amount of practice gave me a smooth ride, and either my wrist, palm, or arms were always killing me no matter how I set my bars, pegs, or seat height.

Well, if you haven't already done so, try rotating your controls forward (two bolts on the left where your mirror mounts, two bolts on the right near the brake reservoir). This will be common knowledge for most, but if you haven't tried it and struggle with pain or throttle response, give it a shot! Mine were in a neutral position before, but rotating forward seemed to do the trick for me. I was surprised that not only was my pain completely gone, but the on/off throttle no longer seemed to be a problem for me to deal with either. Both standing and sitting feel spot on. It seems too good to be true but every ride has been great ever since. I just thought I'd mention it in case anyone was unaware how important this adjustment is for throttle control - it's a real game changer.
 

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Longer arms

Mine were in a neutral position before, but rotating forward seemed to do the trick for me. I was surprised that not only was my pain completely gone, but the on/off throttle no longer seemed to be a problem for me to deal with either.
This is interesting, thank you. So the result is that when fully closed, the throttle is further from you and your arm/hand is more fully extended, which maybe allows finer adjustments? It would make sense if the AT were built also with smaller/shorter riders in mind (Japan for example). I think the occasionally lurchy throttle is mostly down to me being hamfisted, but I might try this.
 

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This is interesting, thank you. So the result is that when fully closed, the throttle is further from you and your arm/hand is more fully extended, which maybe allows finer adjustments? It would make sense if the AT were built also with smaller/shorter riders in mind (Japan for example). I think the occasionally lurchy throttle is mostly down to me being hamfisted, but I might try this.
The AT is built with shorter riders in mind in ASIA you can get a short version of the bike ie much lower seat height because of much lower suspension. If you change the fueling by richening the mixture, the throttle becomes much smoother.
 

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This one is partly lost on me. The adjustment mentioned alters the angle of the clutch and brake levers in relation to the arm. So tall people will need the levers angled down as there arms will be at a steeper angle especially as they are likely to have the seat in the high position. It is a common problem that riders have their levers set too high which puts the wrist at an angle in relation to the arm.

The throttle operation however is not affected by this adjustment unless you are operating the throttle with an open hand ie fingers on the brake lever. So I cant see how throttle operation is improved at low speeds when the fingers are closed around the throttle.

With the brake lever set too high I suppose the action of operating the lever could cause the throttle to open if the wrist was bent too much ?
 

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The first thing I do with a new bike is to adjust the bar and lever rotation for my comfort. Honda street bikes have always had pins in the controls so they wouldn't turn on the bars, but that would be bad on an off-road bike. Set it up the way it fits you, not the mythical average rider.
 

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Well thanks to the op for highlighting this as I am very new to AT and wasn’t aware. I will try it so thanks for posting
 

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This one is partly lost on me. The adjustment mentioned alters the angle of the clutch and brake levers in relation to the arm. So tall people will need the levers angled down as there arms will be at a steeper angle especially as they are likely to have the seat in the high position. It is a common problem that riders have their levers set too high which puts the wrist at an angle in relation to the arm.

The throttle operation however is not affected by this adjustment unless you are operating the throttle with an open hand ie fingers on the brake lever. So I cant see how throttle operation is improved at low speeds when the fingers are closed around the throttle.

With the brake lever set too high I suppose the action of operating the lever could cause the throttle to open if the wrist was bent too much ?
Pointing the levers down forces you to flare your elbows out - now you are holding the throttle more like a screwdriver and your elbows are acting like shock absorbers - this minimizes throttle input from body movements.

Most neutral steering is when the bend of the bars (first bend out of the clamps) is parallel to forks. Most AT I see have the bars rolled back a lot and levers near flat. Fastest tweak is to roll the bars forward which also points the levers down. Adjust from there.

If you look at fast Enduro riders (Chris Birch) they have levers ~5-10 degrees below horizontal - but they also lower their rider triangle (crouch down) when standing and riding fast. For Newbies it is better the levers be more in line with the forearms when standing (~15-30 degrees below flat) to limit fatigue and help with control as they learn off-road skills, but not so much that it compromises road riding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I believe the theories about rider height and covering the front brake are correct. I'm 6'3" and do like to cover the front brake, so those are factors into why this was such an improvement for me.

I also think having the throttle rotated forward means that cruising speed is now at a nice level wrist angle, so you can comfortably adjust around that cruising speed. It feels like the bike wants to go at that ideal speed, rather than you straining to keep it there.
 

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I've heard others mention the abrupt on/off throttle response at low speed as well as throttle hand numbness sometimes extending up into the arms and shoulders - just general discomfort and awkward throttle control. I had severe issues with both, even with Rox risers and grip puppies. No amount of practice gave me a smooth ride, and either my wrist, palm, or arms were always killing me no matter how I set my bars, pegs, or seat height.

Well, if you haven't already done so, try rotating your controls forward (two bolts on the left where your mirror mounts, two bolts on the right near the brake reservoir). This will be common knowledge for most, but if you haven't tried it and struggle with pain or throttle response, give it a shot! Mine were in a neutral position before, but rotating forward seemed to do the trick for me. I was surprised that not only was my pain completely gone, but the on/off throttle no longer seemed to be a problem for me to deal with either. Both standing and sitting feel spot on. It seems too good to be true but every ride has been great ever since. I just thought I'd mention it in case anyone was unaware how important this adjustment is for throttle control - it's a real game changer.
Lol sorry didn’t know this was an issue with anybody here, I’ve done this for years I just can’t stand my levers at 90deg. To the ground, it feels so unnatural to me. And it a PITA when standing up. I usually adjust them while standing to feel good and easy to grab, then back them up just a bit and it usually ends up perfect when sitting. It will very for everyone and will very per bike. But if adjusted right, it will not only make the rider more comfortable it will improve on response in braking and shifting for the non DCT AT’s. You should be able to easily slip your fingers over the lever, believe it or not you can actually twist them pretty far forward/down before they become had to grab unless you have uber large hand grips and hands the size of a 5yo kid. Ok you can’t go to far with the front brake because of the reservoir, but you can do a noticeable amount.
 

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Also consider adding a kaoko throttle stabilizer, made a world of difference for me.
Id second that. I rode my AT for a month or so before I got this device and would never give it up now. In fact I would sacrifice every other mod on the bike before parting with this.
I used to get pain in my lower forearm from the fine muscle action that is necessary on the throttle. I dont thing this something special with the AT, I had a road bike before and even though the entire shoulder and arm positioning was different (in fact more weighted because of that aggressive road bike posture), I also had this pain.

Since the throttle lock, this is gone. I will engage whenever I have more than 30 seconds at the same speed/throttle position. Since it is an analogue threaded tightening mechanism, you can easily make fine adjustments to the throttle setting and then relax again.

This is a god send when on the motorways. You can really release the right hand and do some shoulder exercises while riding just like with the left to release stress.
 

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The above is very true and I echo the sentiments regarding the Kaoko. But it is expensive at £100 and the OP is describing a technique that may mean many riders wouldn;t need a Kaoko to reduce arm tension (even if it would be useful to maintain a constant speed)
Mike
 

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What does angle of controls (brake, clutch) have to do with throttle? Throttle position is just wherever you grab it.
Anyway, brake and clutch should be adjusted in a way that's easiest to use. If you stand much, then you're going to want a compromise position between sitting and standing. This is normally angled down slightly from neutral.
Also, for aggressive/technical riding you're going to want to cover controls with a finger or two. Again, controls must be positioned in way to comfortably allow that.
 

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Pointing the levers down forces you to flare your elbows out - now you are holding the throttle more like a screwdriver and your elbows are acting like shock absorbers - this minimizes throttle input from body movements.

Most neutral steering is when the bend of the bars (first bend out of the clamps) is parallel to forks. Most AT I see have the bars rolled back a lot and levers near flat. Fastest tweak is to roll the bars forward which also points the levers down. Adjust from there.

If you look at fast Enduro riders (Chris Birch) they have levers ~5-10 degrees below horizontal - but they also lower their rider triangle (crouch down) when standing and riding fast. For Newbies it is better the levers be more in line with the forearms when standing (~15-30 degrees below flat) to limit fatigue and help with control as they learn off-road skills, but not so much that it compromises road riding.

Thanks for this thread. I've been suffering greatly from numb hands since I bought my bike. So much so that I often wake up in the morning and my right hand is numb. At first I assumed I was just gripping the throttle too much, so I actively fought against this enough to realize this is not the cause.

Because of everything I've read, today I ordered a Kaoko Throttle Stabilizer. But that's not the big news.

I just went out to my bike and sure enough, I see that my bars are not parallel with my forks. They are rolled significantly towards me. A couple quick turns of a hex wrench and viola, I rolled my bars back to be parallel (to my eyeball) with the forks. I took a quick ride to get some gas, and I love this change. As stated, my elbows are up and the stance feels much more natural for my 6'0 frame. I only drove a couple miles to get some gas, but I swear the steering seems better as well. I'll plan a nice long ride tomorrow, including off road, for verification.

My next thought was brought about by reading this post : 2018 Africa Twin ATAS adventure build
One of the many modifications this guy made was to alter the position of the throttle spring. To quote him "spring is just way to strong, hurts the wrist " so he "moved the spring mount hole by about 90degrees" and "now the force required to pull the throttle has been reduced by about 80%". I'm not comfortable with "hacking" my bike, but I wonder if there are replacement springs with less tension. While I can see how this change might lead to more "whiskey throttle", a subtle change might be worth it.

Thoughts?

Edit : I hit send and my wife told me we're now under Stay At Home order, so no ride tomorrow =/
 

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None at this point. I left other bikes for reasons like this and settled on the AT. We shall see. So far, so good.
 
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