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Discussion Starter #1
I heard somewhere that if you take one spare tube, it should be the front one because in an emergency it can be used to replace the rear tube. Is this true?
If so, what is the down side of this? Do you need to get the right tube in ASAP i.e. this is really only an desperate emergency fix.
If not, then I guess one of each is recommended on a tour.

My mechanic told me that the back one is the one you should take if you only take only one.
His reasoning is that the front one is far more readily available. I am in Europe and intend for a trip in Italy, so this could be a regional thing.

Can anyone comment on this

thanks
 

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I heard somewhere that if you take one spare tube, it should be the front one because in an emergency it can be used to replace the rear tube. Is this true?
If so, what is the down side of this? Do you need to get the right tube in ASAP i.e. this is really only an desperate emergency fix.
If not, then I guess one of each is recommended on a tour.

My mechanic told me that the back one is the one you should take if you only take only one.
His reasoning is that the front one is far more readily available. I am in Europe and intend for a trip in Italy, so this could be a regional thing.

Can anyone comment on this

thanks

I carry a front because it can go in the rear. I'll always patch a tube if I'm able and have never actually had to use a new tube on the road. Also the rear tubes take up a lot of space and weigh a ton.

My advice is to do whatever gives you the most piece of mind.
 

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I did 3m tubeless conversion, so in best case scenario I put in a plug, inflate with portable compressor and continue on my way. On extended trips I carry a front tube and tire irons in case tire bead comes off and I cant get it to re-seat. Not as worried about rear bead but I could stuff the front tube into rear tire and limp back to civilization if necessary. If you are staying with tubes, bring a patch kit and a spare front tube is my recommendation (it's what I did before going tubeless). If you are really going off the beaten path bring patches and both front and rear
 

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Let me point put that a front tyre puncture is a very rare thing - it only happened to me once in almost 40 years of motorbiking, and I know this is also the case with most riders. I personally take both inner tubes with me as if I put the 21" in the back then I will need to change it soon with an 18" and prefer to avoid that.
 

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Let me point put that a front tyre puncture is a very rare thing - it only happened to me once in almost 40 years of motorbiking, and I know this is also the case with most riders. I personally take both inner tubes with me as if I put the 21" in the back then I will need to change it soon with an 18" and prefer to avoid that.
Just returned to a tubed bike about 2 and a half years ago and have had 3 punctures in the front in that time, go figure. Do almost no offroad
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Let me point put that a front tyre puncture is a very rare thing - it only happened to me once in almost 40 years of motorbiking, and I know this is also the case with most riders. I personally take both inner tubes with me as if I put the 21" in the back then I will need to change it soon with an 18" and prefer to avoid that.
that was my thinking. Maybe it is possible to do the 21" tube in a 18" wheel, but I imagine this is not a good idea to keep riding on it.
The folds would create a lot of friction points, also the folds may represent balancing problems on a highway.

Never heard of anyone actually doing this though. Would love to hear in this thread of anyone who has actually done this.
 

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Just returned to a tubed bike about 2 and a half years ago and have had 3 punctures in the front in that time, go figure. Do almost no offroad
What objects caused these punctures?

I've had many rear punctures, no front. I've read that the front tire stands the object up so it punctures the rear. Obviously that applies to some things and not others.
 

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I’ve had a run of bad luck and have had three flat front tires in four months, all on my ATAS. Prior to that, had two rear tubes go out on my KLR over the 9 seasons I had it.

On one of the three front flats, I did use a rear 18” tube and stretched it (very carefully). It was a short day ride and made the mistake of thinking I didn’t need all the gear I normally take.

Either way, on a longer tour I will have both front and back tubes. I tend to go to remote areas and have learned the need to be prepared for anything.

Safe riding!
 

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Bad experience with not bringing both tubes on a long journey. Bring both! Find room. The alternative is a pain in the arse - i.e. not riding.
 

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Let me point put that a front tyre puncture is a very rare thing - it only happened to me once in almost 40 years of motorbiking, and I know this is also the case with most riders. I personally take both inner tubes with me as if I put the 21" in the back then I will need to change it soon with an 18" and prefer to avoid that.
I had two front punctures in three weeks. I even considered selling the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Has anyone used or hear of kevlar tyre liners?
I had some on my mountain bike when I was touring and never had a direct puncture through this liner. An I am talking about +8k kms. Wore the tyre out without a puncture!

Searching for them seems to bring up bicycle tyre liners. Do we not have something like this for adventure bikes?
 

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2 punctures in 3 weeks is not the bikes fault.
Maybe an argument could be made against the tyres/tubes.
I agree it’s not the bike’s fault but the bike has tubed tyres. Changing it to tubeless as I don’t use it on hard off road situation where lowered pressure or roadside repair is essential...was the main driver of my thought. Buying Kineo -the only real solution in my opinion - for 2.5k euroes ,..,is like a joke. So i considered selling the bike....but like it enough that is still with me.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I agree it’s not the bike’s fault but the bike has tubed tyres. Changing it to tubeless as I don’t use it on hard off road situation where lowered pressure or roadside repair is essential...was the main driver of my thought. Buying Kineo -the only real solution in my opinion - for 2.5k euroes ,..,is like a joke. So i considered selling the bike....but like it enough that is still with me.
Heheheheeeee, I see it now.
Yeah 2.5k is a steep price, but you also get a very nice set of wheels that will also be sellable for maybe 1.5k at the end.
Or sell the stockers when you get the new ones. I have no idea what stockers are going for, but its not zero.

Personally I would not extrapolate a trend from 2 punctures in short succession. It is just a matter of probabilities. You may go without any for the next 100k.
 

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I heard somewhere that if you take one spare tube, it should be the front one because in an emergency it can be used to replace the rear tube. Is this true?
If so, what is the down side of this? Do you need to get the right tube in ASAP i.e. this is really only an desperate emergency fix.
If not, then I guess one of each is recommended on a tour.

My mechanic told me that the back one is the one you should take if you only take only one.
His reasoning is that the front one is far more readily available. I am in Europe and intend for a trip in Italy, so this could be a regional thing.

Can anyone comment on this

thanks
The front one is smaller and lighter, the front one will fit in the rear and run for as long as it takes you to get a new rear. A rear will NOT fit in the front. If you ride a lot on sealed roads do not get UHD tubes (stick with HD or standard)they get very hot and in a lot of cases will start to melt the rubber on the surface of the tube. If you ride on gravel and rockey roads you will typically get front punctures with a tube (big hit, tube gets pinched on rim) If its objects on the road its typically the rear that gets holed or staked by an object yes the front will stand up an object for the rear to run it over.
If you go tubeless (KTM just use a rubber strip over the spoke nipples) I use Outex, you will cut the punctures down by at least 50% more like 80% you can still run air pressures down at 22PSI front and back but the front might get a bit beaten up with big rock strikes. I still carry front and back tubes in bags on the front crash bars. Take patches as well , put the spare front in the one you hole then swap back out that night if you only carry a front and you have put it in a rear.
 
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