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Ok, so I recently changed the front tire on the AT. While it was quite easy to lift the front while in the garage using the center stand and a floor jack, I was wondering what people have been using while out on the road? I tried lifting the front end while the bike was on the center stand, but without using a jack - it was nearly impossible, especially with a full fuel tank. So, what simple, lightweight solutions have you been using to lift the front end while on the road? The Leg Up Motorcycle Jack Stand looks promising, but I'm open to suggestions...

Cheers
 

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Ok, so I recently changed the front tire on the AT. While it was quite easy to lift the front while in the garage using the center stand and a floor jack, I was wondering what people have been using while out on the road? I tried lifting the front end while the bike was on the center stand, but without using a jack - it was nearly impossible, especially with a full fuel tank. So, what simple, lightweight solutions have you been using to lift the front end while on the road? The Leg Up Motorcycle Jack Stand looks promising, but I'm open to suggestions...

Cheers

Depends on what you have around you or what you carry to wedge under there. Ideally someone’s weight on the back of the bike and someone lifting the front to pry a brace under the skid plate.
By yourself... a whole lot of curse words and sweat...
Or some slime tube seal and a air compressor (the preferred way)..
 

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You know, in the old days I'd just throw a dirt bike on her side and do the deed. I can't see that happening with the AT, especially on the side of a major highway.

The crash bars look to be a good place to wedge something in, as you can lift the front with them while trying to wedge something in. So, that's at least one access point. The skid plate being the second, but it's a bit hard to lift and get something under there at the same time.
 

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Depends on what you have around you or what you carry to wedge under there. Ideally someone’s weight on the back of the bike and someone lifting the front to pry a brace under the skid plate.
By yourself... a whole lot of curse words and sweat...
Or some slime tube seal and a air compressor (the preferred way)..
55824
 

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Yea the only way I would even remotely change a tube (providing I had the tube) out on the trail would be if it was so bad that the tube sealant didn’t work at all.
I would go the easy route; slime the tire/tube, pump it up, get me back to a garage and let someone else fix it... Not withstanding, that they don’t want BIG bucks to do it...
 

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Yea the only way I would even remotely change a tube (providing I had the tube) out on the trail would be if it was so bad that the tube sealant didn’t work at all.
I would go the easy route; slime the tire/tube, pump it up, get me back to a garage and let someone else fix it... Not withstanding, that they don’t want BIG bucks to do it...
AT-D brings up a good point regarding the tube, and I think others too.

Which tube you to lug around? Both? For long excursions, sure ... along with the tire spoons, wrench, etc. You will still need an air pressure source.

The [tube-based] Slime is okay for punctures. If you have a tire "gash", your can probably forget it. This would also be the case for tubeless tires.

= = =

If you are in a remote desert region, what to do next? Fill the tire with sand? I suppose you can vacuum it out later. Dunno. Hope to never have to deal with it, right Murphy? :rolleyes:
 

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At home, I wedge a short length of 2x4 under the Heed Bunker bars. In the wild, I haven't had to yet, but logs, rocks, sticks are all options. If available, a rope tied to a tree branch will hold her front end up. Worst case, kick her over and work the problem while she sleeps.

However, next time the front tire is off, at home, 3M tubeless conversion. Already did the rear.
 

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when someone comes up with a airless Adventure bike (and 4WD) design tire, they will make billions ...
 

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Look at the simple aluminum brace Bret uses to hold his rear wheel up. He said he can use it on the front as well, but didn't show that.

 

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when someone comes up with a airless Adventure bike (and 4WD) design tire, they will make billions ...
Yeah, ... I guess the concept of tire is as old as the horseless carriage itself.



That said, I know over the decades publishers like Popular Mechanics have taunted us in regards of air-less tires of the future. I think the largest manufacturers (e.g. Michelin) have such products, but their application is limited, and narrow in scope.
 

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Yeah, ... I guess the concept of tire is as old as the horseless carriage itself.



That said, I know over the decades publishers like Popular Mechanics have taunted us in regards of air-less tires of the future. I think the largest manufacturers (e.g. Michelin) have such products, but their application is limited, and narrow in scope.
I’m really guessing it is a consumable thing, if the tire was worn down to being bald but didn’t loose air and still supported the vehicle, cheap people would still continue to drive on them. After all there are people who drive on our current tires until they are so bald that they go flat and have to be replaced.
 

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I’m really guessing it is a consumable thing, if the tire was worn down to being bald but didn’t loose air and still supported the vehicle, cheap people would still continue to drive on them. After all there are people who drive on our current tires until they are so bald that they go flat and have to be replaced.
Yeah, some people for sure.

Others, like me, sometimes run the rear down to the white fibers. I look at the tire and say, "Dare's cotton comin' out of ma tire Virgil."

Actually, I had no idea I was running the rear tire so hard. I replace it as soon as I can.
 

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If you have luggage or a top case on the back it may provide enough to tip the balance to the back. If not, a rock or two, sticks, take off a pannier and stick it under the forks, have a buddy hold down the rear of the bike on the centre stand.
 

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In my opinion it’s just to much trouble and time to do it on the trail.
Do all that work a good chance you will create a bigger mess and other issues.
I’ve had tires that had such stiff sidewalls that even in my garage with the tire locked down and long tire bars I could barely get on the rim (just the rear, fronts usually are much easier) and with those type tire working on a trail with smaller spoons you have 80% + chance of pinching the tube and a VERY hard time getting the tire back on the rim, a good chance of getting something inside the tire (small rock or sand). pretty much the only way I would even remotely think of changing a tube on the trail would be if I also had my no-pinch tool with me too and a some what clean place to work on it.
Slime - compress - go
Get home to change the tube or if traveling some shop/garage that does it.
 

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Depends on what you have around you or what you carry to wedge under there. Ideally someone’s weight on the back of the bike and someone lifting the front to pry a brace under the skid plate.
By yourself... a whole lot of curse words and sweat...
Or some slime tube seal and a air compressor (the preferred way)..
Slime doesn’t work if the tube is torn or the tire has been ridden flat and the penetrating object has made multiple holes.
I’ve seen it tried on a flat a few times. Never worked. Can’t patch a tube easily once slime is everywhere.
It works in theory and may get you to somewhere to better deal with the leak. Just have a plan-B if the slime doesn’t work.
 

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Slime doesn’t work if the tube is torn or the tire has been ridden flat and the penetrating object has made multiple holes.
I’ve seen it tried on a flat a few times. Never worked. Can’t patch a tube easily once slime is everywhere.
It works in theory and may get you to somewhere to better deal with the leak. Just have a plan-B if the slime doesn’t work.
You are correct.

I suspect Slime for tubed wheels is best suited for road riding where the flat is might more likely to be a puncture versus a gash.

That said, Slime advertises a dirt bike on the label. Off road bikes are quite likely to get gash-type flats.

A better "Plan A" might be Outex, with Slime being "Plan C" if "Plan B" does not exist.
 

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It sure is a pain to do it on the road or trail away from the garage, but it's not really that bad.
I've done Heidenau Scouts and Mitas E07 Dakar tires by hand both of which are notoriously stiff sidewall tires.
If it's an emergency and you're stuck somewhere - you'll need to change the tube. You can do it! 👍

In my opinion it’s just to much trouble and time to do it on the trail.
Do all that work a good chance you will create a bigger mess and other issues.
I’ve had tires that had such stiff sidewalls that even in my garage with the tire locked down and long tire bars I could barely get on the rim (just the rear, fronts usually are much easier) and with those type tire working on a trail with smaller spoons you have 80% + chance of pinching the tube and a VERY hard time getting the tire back on the rim, a good chance of getting something inside the tire (small rock or sand). pretty much the only way I would even remotely think of changing a tube on the trail would be if I also had my no-pinch tool with me too and a some what clean place to work on it.
Slime - compress - go
Get home to change the tube or if traveling some shop/garage that does it.
 

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It sure is a pain to do it on the road or trail away from the garage, but it's not really that bad.
I've done Heidenau Scouts and Mitas E07 Dakar tires by hand both of which are notoriously stiff sidewall tires.
If it's an emergency and you're stuck somewhere - you'll need to change the tube. You can do it! 👍
I guess so.

But I know I won't have the tube.

Hopefully the cellular connection is good.

"Hello, CAA?" ("Hello, AAA?")

Heck, don't even need to do that - use their app instead.
 

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Bring a tube - I travel with a front and rear along with the hand tools whenever I go out. It just stays with the bike whenever I go for a ride. Easy peasy.
I guess it depends on the type of riding that you do. If you stay close to home then yes getting 'rescued' by CAA works just fine.
If you are doing rides in remote areas or far from home that really doesn't make a lot of sense - unless there's a catastrophic failure of your bike (I still have CAA/AMA for that).
Changing a tube on front or back of the bike is really about 20-30 minutes work (tops) and you're off on your way again. Standing around waiting for a pick-up would take longer than just doing it yourself. :)
Frankly, I think changing a tube is just basic hand tools and a bit of practice that anyone can do. I started by changing my own tires by hand in the garage to get the hang of it.


I guess so.

But I know I won't have the tube.

Hopefully the cellular connection is good.

"Hello, CAA?" ("Hello, AAA?")

Heck, don't even need to do that - use their app instead.
 
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...
I guess it depends on the type of riding that you do
...
So right.

I try to be a minimalist rider, relative to the type of bike, of course. No kickstartin' single thumper with a nickel for a taillight minimalist ... although I would ride one for the fun factor.

Example: On the AT, no panniers - none. When possible, like last night, no top box.
 
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