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2022 CRF1100 ATAS ES DCT
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Really, unless you are removing the front wheel, you can keep it on the ground I would think.
Wouldn't bother slackening the calipers although that wouldn't be a bad thing to do if you think there is a chance it may not allow the axle/wheel to seat properly.
I would slacken the nut then the pinch bolts and then just move the axle so it is aligned with the right side as per the manual, tighten the pinch bolts on the right and torque the axle nut then slacken right pinch bolts, torque left and then apply brakes and pump forks a few times then torque right pinch bolts.
 

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2022 ES
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
The handlebar is straight now but it still tracks right. I did notice the axle is inset slightly (1-2mm). The manual indicates it should be even. I tried to nudge it over while everything was loose but it didn't want to go. Would this cause the bike to track right? My bike may have been slightly unlevel in the rear stand while I did the work, would that be a problem?
 

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2022 CRF1100 ATAS ES DCT
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If the axle is not flush then it is possible the wheel could be offset to one side but that depends on how the axle and spacers fit with regards the clamps and I can't remember.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Round #2. Same as the first except this time I removed the brakes also. When I took the right brake off I noticed the pistons were depressed unevenly (see screenshot). Caliper bolts had resistance. Left brake pistons were even, bolts had no resistance. This time when I bounced the front forks the axel became perfectly flush on the right side, no more 1-2mm inset.
Shoe Helmet Automotive tire Headgear Bag
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
The saga continues...I'd say it is only 90% fixed. Bike is still pulling right...a little. Handlebar is still slightly off too. Plotting round 3. Plan at the moment is try again but also take the wheel off the axle, loosen the fender, risers, and the steering stem nut.
 

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Please allow an old-timer to comment about "bike pulls slightly to the right (left)" on chain drive bikes.

First, make sure the front fork is straight. Loosen axle clamp bolts or whatever, and the lower triple clamp bolts. Bounce up and down. Tighten the triple clamp bolts. Bounce up and down. Tighten the axle clamp bolts.

Then, test ride the bike. make sure you have windless conditions, level pavement. Bounce your butt up and down and drop onto the seat in the middle. In other words, make sure everything is right. Then decide whether or not the bike is really pulling to one side. Let's say there's a slight tendency to pull right.

Then, loosen the rear axle. Move the right side of the axle back by 1 "flat". This small change probably won't affect chain adjustment greatly.

Test ride and repeat, as necessary, until the bike tracks straight.

Once the bike tracks straight, ALWAYS turn the adjusters the exact same number of flats when adjusting the chain. If you lose track (no pun intended), you'll probably have to repeat the process.

I've learned long ago that I prefer a bike that tracks straight to a bike with "perfect wheel alignment". My definition of "perfect wheel alignment" is: The bike tracks straight."

Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
First, make sure the front fork is straight. Loosen axle clamp bolts or whatever, and the lower triple clamp bolts. Bounce up and down. Tighten the triple clamp bolts. Bounce up and down. Tighten the axle clamp bolts.

Then, loosen the rear axle. Move the right side of the axle back by 1 "flat". This small change probably won't affect chain adjustment greatly.
I gave it another shot yesterday. I did exactly what is in the manual for tire install plus I loosened lower triple clamp bolts, fender, handlebar, and risers. Now I can get my hands off the bars without issue, but it still feels like the bike wants to go right a tiny bit.

After the bouncing/braking to align everything I found the axle was inset 1mm. I could push the right fork in to make it even, but decided to leave it where it naturally landed. Maybe this is normal, idk.

I did adjust my chain so it is very possible I misaligned the rear wheel also, I'll take a look. If that don't work I might give in and let the dealer have it for 3 weeks.
 

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The axle should be flush according to the manual and mine is. With the bolts all slack you push until flush then tighten right clamping bolts to keep it there while you torque the nut.
 

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Disregard the factory rear axle indexing marks. They are good for an initial adjustment, but not sensitive enough for fine tuning. That axle alignment has to be perfect for the bike to track straight.

All the famous "tried and true" alignment methods- two straight edges, string, etc., are very difficult to execute exactly. And even if they are performed "correctly", they don't account for other issues. The frame geometry for a production bike is not always "as designed". The fork axis may not be perpendicular to the swingarm pivot. The front wheel centerline may not lie in the same plane as the rear wheel centerline. There are tolerances that can cancel or combine additively.

These issues can be a real pain on a shaft drive bike where the rear wheel has no easy adjustments. Take your BMW to the dealer and tell him it pulls to the right when you take your hands off the bars. He'll tell you that you aren't supposed to take your hands off the bars. Really.

Bottom line: Adjust everything "by the book". Then fine tune with rear axle adjustment.
 
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