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Hello - I have a 2016 Wing with 26k on it.

Last fall, I bought a RE Himalayan and quickly discovered the advantages of a lighter, smaller bike.

While I am not quite there yet when it comes to selling the Wing and getting a lighter bike, I think I have crossed over the 50% line towards it happening.

The Africa Twin makes a heckuva lotta sense to transition to.

Anyone make this move? What has been your experience, good and bad?
 

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If a GL1200 before the AT counts, then yes, but I don't think that's what you're looking for :LOL:

On the flip side, I'm debating getting a DCT bagger as a second bike. Had the pleasure of test riding one while my AT was getting serviced. It was a dream, so smooth and quick considering what it is. Love it!
 

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@FIRE UP is one of a few Forum members who can speak Honda Gold Wing and Africa Twin in the same sentence.
It's called Goldtwin language! ;)

"Anyone make this move? What has been your experience, good and bad?"
VStarRider,
It's a long story but, here's the condensed version. We had an '08 Level II Wing for 10 years. It had 38,000 miles on it. It had been sitting for a few months without riding it. I took a look at it one day and out of the blue, decided we were done riding longer distances and no longer needed the heavy Wing sitting around.

At the same time, I had taken the Wing in for the brake recall and while waiting for the wife to pick me up at the dealer, I strolled around the floor at the dealership. When I stumbled up a 2020 Africa Twin Adventure Sports bike, I was instantly mesmerized. I climbed on it and like a little kid, just sat there dreaming.

Well, we got home from that dream session and I joined the Africa Twin forum. I asked about the bikes and years, models, changes and whatnot. More than one or two answered me with: "If you're really interested but the '20 model is too much money (floor price of $17,xxx for manual version, add $800 for the DCT), then look around for "new-old-stock" versions".

So, I did. I called a couple of dealers and low and behold, at that time, the infamous COVID beginning, there were a few dealers with 2018 A/T's, brand new in April of 2020, on their floors. So, I promptly traded in my Wing for a brand new, 2018 A/T-A/S-DCT in April of '20. I have never regretted that move.

But, we have re-acquired our desire to ride, for some times longer distances. So, since a DCT Wing brand new was out of my price range, I purchased a '15 BMW K-1600 GTL-E. Outstanding bike, seriously fast, but, primitive in some ways. The CEO was not happy with it. So, step forward about a year and, vuuuuuualllla, we have ourselves an '18 Tour DCT Airbag model in Candy Ardent red and, at the time of purchase, about 5+ months ago, it had a whopping 5,300 miles on it.

That DCT Wing is without a doubt, the finest machine I've ever owned. I love it to death and the CEO seriously approves of it.
I love both bikes. The A/T has its place in my riding scenarios. The Wing fills all other voids. Very tough if I had to get rid of the A/T.
Scott
 

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Hello - I have a 2016 Wing with 26k on it.

Last fall, I bought a RE Himalayan and quickly discovered the advantages of a lighter, smaller bike.

While I am not quite there yet when it comes to selling the Wing and getting a lighter bike, I think I have crossed over the 50% line towards it happening.

The Africa Twin makes a heckuva lotta sense to transition to.

Anyone make this move? What has been your experience, good and bad?
  • it depends if you are doing multi-days, long hwy trips, if you are then there is nothing better then the Wing
  • if you like the idea of doing pavement, and then jump on some service gravel roads, then ATAS is a great choice, it will not disappoint you.
  • I had GL1500 wing, GL1800 wing, two FJR1300's, Concours1400 all great bikes to go from East to West coast "in comfort"...but since I am not into long trips anymore I decided to go ADV, picked up '18 Vstrom650xa and what a great bike that is, it's nice to have a bike that can do paved and non-paved equally good.
  • I just picked up a '22 ATAS ES DCT, since I always wanted at least one bike with DCT, and was not ready for yet another Wing. ATAS feels much, much lighter then any of the bikes above, by at least 50% factor, easy to move around the garage or handle at slow speed, U-turns and such. Enough power, great ES suspension, nimble, decent creature comfort and solid wind management, with Air-Hawk pillow 700miles days are quite doable.
  • keep the Wing and get the ATAS as well, and you'll have one of the "best combos in the World" (y) ;)
 

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  • it depends if you are doing multi-days, long hwy trips, if you are then there is nothing better then the Wing
  • if you like the idea of doing pavement, and then jump on some service gravel roads, then ATAS is a great choice, it will not disappoint you.
  • I had GL1600 wing, GL1800 wing, two FJR1300's, Concours1400 all great bikes to go from East to West coast "in comfort"...but since I am not into long trips anymore I decided to go ADV, picked up '18 Vstrom650xa and what a great bike that is, it's nice to have a bike that can do paved and non-paved equally good.
  • I just picked up a '22 ATAS ES DCT, since I always wanted at least one bike with DCT, and was not ready for yet another Wing. ATAS feels much, much lighter then any of the bikes above, by at least 50% factor, easy to move around the garage or handle at slow speed, U-turns and such. Enough power, great ES suspension, nimble, decent creature comfort and solid wind management, with Air-Hawk pillow 700miles days are quite doable.
  • keep the Wing and get the ATAS as well, and you'll have one of the "best combos in the World" (y) ;)
"I've had a GL 1600 Wing"????
Well, I've had 6 Goldwings myself. An '84 1200 Interstate, an '85 Aspencade 1200, a '94 GL1500 Aspencade, an '02 GL 1800, an '08 GL1800 and my present '18 GL1800 (technically an 1833). As long as I've known about, ridden and owned Goldwings, I myself have never heard of a GL 1600. Was that some special model in a limited production? Did it sell in other parts of the world and not in the U.S.? Just wondering?
Scott
 

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I have both with and without (bagger ) DCT , best GL ever .
 

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Well, I grew up on dirt bikes, have had a bike since I was 5 years old. Started on a 1969 Honda Z50A. Have had every Japanese brand dirt bike. At 40 got my first cruiser, a Yamaha Roadstar. Then went the touring route, got a Yamaha Royal Star Venture. Then the Harley bug bit me and got a Ultra Classic. Then I decided to get a 08 Goldwing, loved the bike, but I am not that big and the Wing just felt so enormous compared to the Ultra Classic, so I went back and got CVO Ultra Classic. When the 18 model Wings came out, I made the mistake of test riding one. WELL, in 2020, I bought a 2020 DCT Tour and it is the finest bike I have every owned!
2021 came along and some of my riding buddies that have adventure bikes were planning on doing a Backcountry Discovery Route. They have been pestering me for a couple of years to get a adventure bike but I just couldn't at the time ( two kids in college). Well after checking out the BDR videos,the dirt bug bit me and I found a used, CHEAP, Honda CB500X. Did the BDR on it. It was fun, but it was work riding that 500 thru the technical sections. Kind of like using a butter knife on a steak, it will do the job, but it aint easy. Came home and sold it and bought a 2016 Africa Twin with 10,000 miles already kitted out with everything on it. Did the Idaho BDR this year, and it is an AWESOME bike. Very capable of doing long road trips. We live in Texas and the total mileage for the Idaho BDR for me was 5250 miles.
That being said, it is no Goldwing when it comes to really eating up the pavement. I am glad I have both the Wing and the AT. But I will say, if I was limited to just one bike, I would pick the Africa Twin because it is so versatile and able to let you experience both road and dirt and do both well.
 

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Four years after buying my AT, I bought a '21 Goldwing DCT non-tour. 8,500 miles and eight months later, I sold the Goldwing. Back in 2010, I bought an 8k mile 2005 Goldwing and kept it for about a year and a half. So, two Gold wings.

My AT is going to be around for a long time. It's a solid bike. Most likely it's not going to be ridden much more on Jeep trails like the Alpine Loop. Here around the home area, it's mostly street riding. In fact, I just purchased a set of the OEM saddlebags for convenience over the Wolfman Rocky Mountain bags.
 

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"I've had a GL 1600 Wing"????
Well, I've had 6 Goldwings myself. An '84 1200 Interstate, an '85 Aspencade 1200, a '94 GL1500 Aspencade, an '02 GL 1800, an '08 GL1800 and my present '18 GL1800 (technically an 1833). As long as I've known about, ridden and owned Goldwings, I myself have never heard of a GL 1600. Was that some special model in a limited production? Did it sell in other parts of the world and not in the U.S.? Just wondering?
Scott
It was a typo, it was a GL1500 (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for these great replies!

I add some more info.

The '16 Wing is my second one (first one was F6B). I have put 50k miles on Wings combined. Those who own/owned Wings know they handle well for the 900+ lb piggies they are. I discounted the voices of those saying lighter bikes are easier to handle, more nimble, etc. As mentioned, I bought a Himalayan in Fall 2021. It is 500 lbs lighter than the Wing. I have not been the same rider since.

The 430 lb Himalayan is very flickable, confidence inspiring, nimble. It is a very different experience than the Wing. The upright, tall riding position is great. In comparison, the Wing is heavy, hard to maneuver at low speeds / by hand ... and ... intimidating? That might be the word. I am 47 years old, in good physical condition, 6'1" and strong, but dread manhandling the Wing. I enjoy the simpler riding experience of the Himalayan. The Wing is luxurious, powerful and comfortable, while the Himalayan is simple, carefree and fun. I enjoy the Himalayan so much that I bought another RE, a Classic 350. Another simple, fun ride.

I took the Wing on a 2000 mile New England trip this summer and had a great time. I also took it on another 800 mile trip. Aside from a few other short runs, the Wing has sat much of the summer. I have not ridden it in a month. I always choose the Classic or Himalayan.

So, what I have been looking at is replacing the Wing with a bike with more of the characteristics of the Himalayan but capable of longer rides that may require interstate speeds to get to a destination and back in reasonable time. I also want a reliable bike with a strong dealer network, cruise control, comfort, some weather protection, and be capable of 300 mile days on two-laners, and the ability to do some light off-roading (gravel and dirt roads that a Subaru can handle) to explore some neat places where the pavement stops. The Africa Twin AS checks the most boxes. While I have a newfound appreciation for simplicity, I like the idea of a DCT. Other bikes I am looking at include the V-Strom, Versys, Tiger 660/850, Tracer 9 GT, BMW 850. I do not want a larger displacement adventure bike.

Thanks for feedback on the AT not competing with the Wing for long distances on the slab. Another question I am considering after my 2000 mile trip this summer, which was as exhausting as it was enjoyable - do I want to do those multi-state trips anymore? Especially since I ride solo?
 

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Thanks for feedback on the AT not competing with the Wing for long distances on the slab. Another question I am considering after my 2000 mile trip this summer, which was as exhausting as it was enjoyable - do I want to do those multi-state trips anymore? Especially since I ride solo?
I agree, the key is the "versatility of the ADV bike" it's so nice to be out and about ridding, and then you see a nice service road, and just jump on it, knowing your Africa Twin, KTM, Tiger, GS, Super Tenere, etc, will handle gravel with confidence and they are also great on highways.
That's the biggest reason why the whole ADV segment is so popular, I read once that there are 20 times more gravel roads then paved roads in the World, so one more reason to ride something that is "off road capable"

Test ride one of the big bore ADV bikes, you'll love it, and for some reason feel younger :D
 

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It was a typo, it was a GL1500 (y)
Roger that, thanks for the reply. I'd seen a previous mention of a 1600 Wing (can't remember where) and thought, hmmmm, did I miss an entirely different Wing in some era? Guess not.
Scott

OP,
As stated, I have two DCT's. The Wing and the A/T-A/S-DCT. I purchased the A/T first and when I was enquiring about the DCT prior to purchase, I was advised to take as long as 4-6 hours on a test ride to make sure I get the "HANG OF IT". Well, I hopped onto a '17 A/T DCT for a test ride at a dealer in Scottsdale AZ and, before I'd gone TWO CITY BLOCKS, I was thoroughly convinced that this transmission IS FOR ME!!!!!!!!!!!

I rode about 10-15 more minutes on that test ride and knew right off the bat, yep, I'll never shift again if I have any say-so. Came back to the dealer with a HUGE smile on my face. The wife said I looked like a 5-year-old with a new bicycle. We loaded up the new '18 A/T and headed home. I have had absolutely ZERO regrets on the choice of a DCT. I can to ultra-tight (as tight as I dare) U-turns on both pavement and dirt and have zero problems doing so with that transmission. Besides, for the life of me, I can't figure out WHY so many worry about tight U-turns or tight turns in either dirt or pavement and the clutch-work that's done. What, you spend all day making U-turns? Not me.

If I'm riding, dirt of pavement and get to a point where I need to turn really sharp or even a turn-a-round situation and I can't do it all in one motion, BIG DEAL! I'll get that bike turned around one way or another. I've not died on a trail yet because I couldn't make a U-turn with a DCT.

Slow, fast and anywhere in between, the DCT does exactly what I want it to, when I want to do it. And, for those ultra-rare times that I feel I need to take control of what gear I'm in or think I should be in an alternate gear, there's always the paddle shifters. There's lots of riders out there that absolutely can't live without a CLUTCH! Well, I'm not one. I've shifted oh, maybe over a million times in my life in trucks, tankers, fire trucks, motorcycles, cars, pickups and more. I'M DONE SHIFTING. I still get a great thrill riding a motorcycle. And an even nicer more pleasant thrill with the DCT!
Scott
 
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Roger that, thanks for the reply. I'd seen a previous mention of a 1600 Wing (can't remember where) and thought, hmmmm, did I miss an entirely different Wing in some era? Guess not.
Scott

OP,
As stated, I have two DCT's. The Wing and the A/T-A/S-DCT. I purchased the A/T first and when I was enquiring about the DCT prior to purchase, I was advised to take as long as 4-6 hours on a test ride to make sure I get the "HANG OF IT". Well, I hopped onto a '17 A/T DCT for a test ride at a dealer in Scottsdale AZ and, before I'd gone TWO CITY BLOCKS, I was thoroughly convinced that this transmission IS FOR ME!!!!!!!!!!!

I rode about 10-15 more minutes on that test ride and knew right off the bat, yep, I'll never shift again if I have any say-so. Came back to the dealer with a HUGE smile on my face. The wife said I looked like a 5-year-old with a new bicycle. We loaded up the new '18 A/T and headed home. I have had absolutely ZERO regrets on the choice of a DCT. I can to ultra-tight (as tight as I dare) U-turns on both pavement and dirt and have zero problems doing so with that transmission. Besides, for the life of me, I can't figure out WHY so many worry about tight U-turns or tight turns in either dirt or pavement and the clutch-work that's done. What, you spend all day making U-turns? Not me.

If I'm riding, dirt of pavement and get to a point where I need to turn really sharp or even a turn-a-round situation and I can't do it all in one motion, BIG DEAL! I'll get that bike turned around one way or another. I've not died on a trail yet because I couldn't make a U-turn with a DCT.

Slow, fast and anywhere in between, the DCT does exactly what I want it to, when I want to do it. And, for those ultra-rare times that I feel I need to take control of what gear I'm in or think I should be in an alternate gear, there's always the paddle shifters. There's lots of riders out there that absolutely can't live without a CLUTCH! Well, I'm not one. I've shifted oh, maybe over a million times in my life in trucks, tankers, fire trucks, motorcycles, cars, pickups and more. I'M DONE SHIFTING. I still get a great thrill riding a motorcycle. And an even nicer more pleasant thrill with the DCT!
Scott
Ha ha, you ARE all "FIREed UP" about the DCT aren't you?
I share your excitement about the system, and can't be happier about my ATAS DCT.
  • It's funny how the "nothing like the Manual shifting" attitude is still "alive and well" and it doesn't make room to new and better technology... just like Fax machines, CD's, VCR's :rolleyes:
  • It's interesting that on all motorcycle forums you never read about the "clutching and shifting discomfort" people experience while riding? It's always "fun,fun,fun,easy and effortless"
  • I wear Alpinestar MX6 boots, and all I can say is the "shifting pad" is paper thin, and after a few hours of shifting I use to be in pain, and the top of my left foot arch was all red... how can that be comfortable?
  • I figured on a 3-4 hr joy ride there are about 750-800 changes of gears, so we can say it qualifies as "labor intensive"
  • Whoever decided to use the top of the left foot to perform such a repetitive work, was not a Podiatrist :rolleyes:. This area of Human foot (thin and sensitive skin, nerves and muscles) are not "designed" for such demanding and unnatural task.
  • If one can develop carpal tunnel just by working a computer mouse, imagine the stresses caused to the ligaments and tissues in the upper section of your foot?
  • I still have the 6sp Vstrom, but for some reason I noticed that I much rather grab the ATAS keys when going out riding (could it be because I don't prefer the "easy" clutching?) :unsure::) ...time to get that "Heel Toe Shifter" for my Vstrom.
 

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Professional formula racers don't use a clutch anymore, or they have a clutch, but don't need to use it.

In any case, the clutch is likened to the steam era and eventually everything will be electrically "actuated" directly and indirectly.
 

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I prefer the two bike theory, I have a 16 AT and a 18 GL both in DCT. I ride the GL 2 up and take the AT when solo and have the urge to do the forest roads. As far as I’m concerned DCT is the cats ass, I will probably never go back, in fact I just bought my third DCT, a Honda Rubicon and I love that DCT just as much as the other two. If Honda does come out with this new rumored TransAlp and it has a 21” front wheel, weighs around 450 lb and comes with DCT it will probably be my forth.
 

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I prefer the two bike theory, I have a 16 AT and a 18 GL both in DCT. I ride the GL 2 up and take the AT when solo and have the urge to do the forest roads. As far as I’m concerned DCT is the cats ass, I will probably never go back, in fact I just bought my third DCT, a Honda Rubicon and I love that DCT just as much as the other two. If Honda does come out with this new rumored TransAlp and it has a 21” front wheel, weighs around 450 lb and comes with DCT it will probably be my forth.
TWO bikes is the ONLY way to go (y) :p ...but aren't you worried paddle shifting is not macho ENOUGH...cause according to some, you are less of a man if ridding DCT :unsure:...you're just not "doing" enough while ridding

...I am not even sure if you are allowed to park at your local Starbucks :rolleyes:
 

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TWO bikes is the ONLY way to go (y) :p ...but aren't you worried paddle shifting is not macho ENOUGH...cause according to some, you are less of a man if ridding DCT :unsure:...you're just not "doing" enough while ridding

...I am not even sure if you are allowed to park at your local Starbucks :rolleyes:
I don't even think about DCT or not-to-DCT. It works well and outperforms. That is all that matters in my daily routine.

If I was stuck with a non-DCT, then I would use it just as well.
 

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I don't even think about DCT or not-to-DCT. It works well and outperforms. That is all that matters in my daily routine.

If I was stuck with a non-DCT, then I would use it just as well.
I am with you...I also love my DCT as well, it's just funny(not) how most of the motorcycle community still "does not accept" anything but "clutch and shifter"...every time you bring it up in a conversation it's like; "ohh automatic?...that's not motorcycling anymore ...bla,bla...I will never ride anything but manual"

why is "bikers attitude" so different then "car drivers attitude"...car aficionados brag about the DCT's, paddles are actually preferred if you own a nice performance car?
 
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