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Ya know,
Waaaaaaaaaay back a few thousand years ago, around the time frame of the late '70's and early '80's, there was this belief that the ONLY way to have a JEEP, was for it to be a STICK! Those who purchased automatic Jeeps were just plain sissies and that it was thought that there was "more control" with a stick in a Jeep. Wellllllll, it took a while but, eventually the concrete mind-set that endured since Christ was born, migrated over to AUTOMATICS in Jeeps.

We've owned 9 Jeep Wranglers in around 38 years of Jeeping. (3) CJ's, (2) YJ's, (3) TJ's and our present one, a JK Rubicon. Seven of those Jeeps have been automatics. We know many, many folks that are into Jeeping and having fun with them. ALL of them are driving automatics.

Now, as far as I know, Honda is the only motorcycle manufacturer to offer at least your altered form of an automatic in the DCT. Some claim the DCT is NOT and automatic transmission. They claim it's a manual tranny with two clutches. Well, sort-a true and not sort-a true. If it shifts both up and down gears without me putting any input from any part of my body other than the throttle, IT'S AN AUTOMATIC in my book!
Can-Am has I think, one that will shift sort of automatic in one direction but, will not shift automatic in the other direction. I'm sure someone with more expertise in this will chime in.

But, other than the potential influx of the E-motorcycle which to this point in time, I've not seen any demos of a MANUAL electric motorcycle, I'm not sure any other motorcycle manufacturer is even thinking about migrating over to a DCT form or any other form of an automatic. Oh, there's the CVT in the side x sides but, I don't think I've seen any in a two wheeler. Maybe so.

I've said it on here many, many times, I really like the DCT and will never go back to a manual.
Scott
 
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450k miles between 3 goldwings. 130k miles on Africa twins DCTs. I ride about 30k miles a year.

Wing is for smooth pavement, 2 up touring. AT is for adventure touring.

Some guys camp to ride, I ride to camp.
 

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...but aren't you worried paddle shifting is not macho ENOUGH...cause according to some, you are less of a man if ridding DCT :unsure:...you're just not "doing" enough while ridding

...I am not even sure if you are allowed to park at your local Starbucks :rolleyes:
I can understand the reluctance to go to a motorcycle with an automatic transmission. Most, if not all of the bikes with automatic transmissions I knew of were dogs in the performance description no matter how good they might appear cosmetically. If a rider wanted performance, the only option was a manual clutch. Honda has changed that with the DCT. They got it right and I like many others have no desire to back a manual clutch. The few times the DCT picks a gear I don't want; the shift buttons correct that.
As for "paddle shifting is not macho ENOUGH"... I guess all those high paid race car drivers must be real sissies. Try sell that to the people watching from the grandstands. ;)
 

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I can understand the reluctance to go to a motorcycle with an automatic transmission. Most, if not all of the bikes with automatic transmissions I knew of were dogs in the performance description no matter how good they might appear cosmetically. If a rider wanted performance, the only option was a manual clutch. Honda has changed that with the DCT. They got it right and I like many others have no desire to back a manual clutch. The few times the DCT picks a gear I don't want; the shift buttons correct that.
As for "paddle shifting is not macho ENOUGH"... I guess all those high paid race car drivers must be real sissies. Try sell that to the people watching from the grandstands. ;)
"Most, if not all the bikes with automatic transmissions......" May I ask Sir, when you say "Most, if not all", what bikes you're speaking of? I don't follow the motorcycle world daily so, at present, the ONLY bike that I have ever seen (never rode one) that came from the factory with an AUTOMATIC was the *Hondamatic" in a 750 waaaaaay back a few decades ago. And from what I heard, yes, it was not all that peppy. But, other than that brand/model, I don't know of any other automatic motorcycle. Unless you're referring to the newer Can-Ams with what I'd call the 1/2 automatic since it doesn't automatically shift in both directions.

Now, if you're speaking of things like a Burgman, well that to me, isn't really a motorcycle as more of an over grown scooter. Just my opinion here.
Scott
 

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I almost couldn't read the brand. "Aprilla
Well, I couldn't really tell what model it was/is from the pic other than it's an Aprilia. I looked up Aprilia's website and nowhere does at least that site speak of an automatic tranny. But I asked Google, and it came up yes, the 850 Mana did come with a CVT transmission. A CVT tranny is entirely different from a DCT or any other transmission. The basics are two adjustable pulleys. One closes the gap and one opens the gap with a belt in between the two. The ratio between power and speed is constantly changing. Is it classified as an "automatic"? Yep, sure is. I think Burgmans use that style.

A very, very large percentage of the worlds side x sides are equipped with a CVT tranny. Honda's Talon side x side is equipped the DCT tranny.
 

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Yamaha revised 2006 FJR1300 — available in two versions, including the 1300A (traditional clutch system) and 1300AE (featuring an automatic clutch).
First things first. The “automatic” FJR1300AE is not an automatic. That’s right, it features a manual transmission. The only difference from a traditional motorcycle transmission is the automatic clutch. The FJR1300AE requires manual gear changes (with the traditional left-foot lever, or handlebar-mounted triggers) — it is simply missing a clutch lever. The motorcycle’s computer controls engagement and disengagement of the clutch

 

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Well,
I'm no expert on the technicalities of this sort of thing but, if Yamaha was touting that bike as and "Automatic", I'd have to question that. Yes, there may be no clutch lever but that person in that video is clearly MANUALLY SHIFTING that bike, both up the gears and down. Albeit it appears he's doing it with the use of paddle shifters. Now, since I don't see a clutch lever, and, I don't see and have never seen the controls on that set of handlebars to see if there's any form of "D" or "M" like the DCT version Hondas have, then how does it operate?
So, with that being said, what exactly does the operator do on initial take-off? Like I stated earlier, I don't follow the motorcycle world so, I really don't know what kind of innovations have appeared, hung around and then disappeared or are still available.
Scott
 

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I almost couldn't read the brand. "Aprilla

Well, I couldn't really tell what model it was/is from the pic other than it's an Aprilia. I looked up Aprilia's website and nowhere does at least that site speak of an automatic tranny. But I asked Google, and it came up yes, the 850 Mana did come with a CVT transmission. A CVT tranny is entirely different from a DCT or any other transmission. The basics are two adjustable pulleys. One closes the gap and one opens the gap with a belt in between the two. The ratio between power and speed is constantly changing. Is it classified as an "automatic"? Yep, sure is. I think Burgmans use that style.

A very, very large percentage of the worlds side x sides are equipped with a CVT tranny. Honda's Talon side x side is equipped the DCT tranny.
It is a CVT-based powertrain. But take a closer look at the implementation (see image above).

In addition, you can optionally switch gears. There are seven, and you can use a foot shifter and handlebar paddle switches. At the time Aprilia was way ahead of Honda. Honda likely stole many ideas, including the "frunk" later used in the NC750X.

I think the Mana 850 (839 cc) would give the CRF1100 DCT a run for its money in a drag, however, it would loose steam at the top end (beyond the ton anyway).
 

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It is a CVT-based powertrain. But take a closer look at the implementation (see image above).

In addition, you can optionally switch gears. There are seven, and you can use a foot shifter and handlebar paddle switches. At the time Aprilia was way ahead of Honda. Honda likely stole many ideas, including the "frunk" later used in the NC750X.

I think the Mana 850 (839 cc) would give the CRF1100 DCT a run for its money in a drag, however, it would loose steam at the top end (beyond the ton anyway).
"CVT based"? I'm certainly no expert on this stuff but, as I'm led to believe, a CVT transmission is described as or, defined as a Constant Variable Transmission, correct? Now, the base mechanism for that style transmission is a dual, variable pully system, correct? Two pulleys, each one varies that distance apart from each half, with a V-belt in between the two. The ratio from the DRIVE to the DRIVEN pulleys changes infinitely which is in response to amount of power and or speed needed.

So, if that's the base operation of a CVT, then why would the Mana 850 also need a set of gears that the rider can or has to shift, either manually with paddles or a foot shifter? I mean, to me, that sounds like having TWO transmissions, one behind the other. Always learning things here.
Scott
 

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"CVT based"? I'm certainly no expert on this stuff but, as I'm led to believe, a CVT transmission is described as or, defined as a Constant Variable Transmission, correct? Now, the base mechanism for that style transmission is a dual, variable pully system, correct? Two pulleys, each one varies that distance apart from each half, with a V-belt in between the two. The ratio from the DRIVE to the DRIVEN pulleys changes infinitely which is in response to amount of power and or speed needed.

So, if that's the base operation of a CVT, then why would the Mana 850 also need a set of gears that the rider can or has to shift, either manually with paddles or a foot shifter? I mean, to me, that sounds like having TWO transmissions, one behind the other. Always learning things here.
Scott
That is correct Scott, a pretty amazing use of a CVT system by Aprilia.

The rear tire wears out pretty fast on the Mana during spirited riding - but it did not have a torque control system on it at the time either.

The gears are virtual in nature. So out of the gate to maximum velocity the feeling is completely seamless and quick frankly, scary fast. Nevertheless, the gear selector(s) behave the same as any motorcycle - you can shift up when the engine RPM is enough, and shift down and listen to the engine rev up.

All that and you still had to maintain a final chain drive (yay).
 

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"Most, if not all the bikes with automatic transmissions......" May I ask Sir, when you say "Most, if not all", what bikes you're speaking of? I don't follow the motorcycle world daily so, at present, the ONLY bike that I have ever seen (never rode one) that came from the factory with an AUTOMATIC was the *Hondamatic" in a 750 waaaaaay back a few decades ago. And from what I heard, yes, it was not all that peppy. But, other than that brand/model, I don't know of any other automatic motorcycle. Unless you're referring to the newer Can-Ams with what I'd call the 1/2 automatic since it doesn't automatically shift in both directions.

Now, if you're speaking of things like a Burgman, well that to me, isn't really a motorcycle as more of an overgrown scooter. Just my opinion here.
Scott
I don't remember the specifics on the ones I saw. I considered them mostly curiosities at the time. Several used CVTs as a transmission which is basically the drive line from a snowmobile. The 750 Hondamatic as noted was a bit of a disappointment. I believe there was also another Hondamatic in the 400 class which was even less notable. At least it got Honda pointed in the right direction.
 

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I have a bit of a different view than many. I have 4 bikes now, including a GL1800A, and the last two years for my extended rides of 4,000 to 6,000 miles I have taken my ATAS as it is more comfortable than my Wing, and I have custom seats on both. Just better body geometry, and when the roads get nasty the 21" front wheel is there to address it. Only downside is the chain maintenance and the bloody thing is a lot harder to pick up than the Wing if it falls over.
 

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Hello - I have a 2016 Wing with 26k on it.

Last fall, I bought a RE Himalayan and quickly discovered the advantages of a lighter, smaller bike.

While I am not quite there yet when it comes to selling the Wing and getting a lighter bike, I think I have crossed over the 50% line towards it happening.

The Africa Twin makes a heckuva lotta sense to transition to.

Anyone make this move? What has been your experience, good and bad?
Yes, I had a 2015 goldwing. Hit a chunk of concrete that fell off a truck in front of me. Totaled the bike. I bought a 2020 goldwing, and I wanted a lighter bike as well and bought the africa twin. Love ❤ it.
 

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Hello - I have a 2016 Wing with 26k on it.

Last fall, I bought a RE Himalayan and quickly discovered the advantages of a lighter, smaller bike.

While I am not quite there yet when it comes to selling the Wing and getting a lighter bike, I think I have crossed over the 50% line towards it happening.

The Africa Twin makes a heckuva lotta sense to transition to.

Anyone make this move? What has been your experience, good and bad?
I went from a ‘19 GL1800 DCT to a ‘21 ATASESDCT.

Good- Lighter, more usable, easier to work on and better gas mileage.
Bad- Not as comfortable.

if you want to know anything else just ask.
 

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I went from a ‘19 GL1800 DCT to a ‘21 ATASESDCT.

Good- Lighter, more usable, easier to work on and better gas mileage.
Bad- Not as comfortable.

if you want to know anything else just ask.
I'm 6' 2 1/2" and presently 245. While not nearly as agile and strong as I once was, I can say for sure that the Wing is quite a bit easier to maneuver around than the A/T - A/S - DCT in ultra slow conditions, like pushing either one around in the garage, simply because it's so much shorter and a lot lower center of gravity.

As far as gas mileage, my they're both almost identical. I have achieved 55-60 mpg many, many times on the Wing and the A/T is almost identical. Each bike has a definite purpose for sure. I love that A/T a lot. It's great on the pavement and decent in most lighter duty trails.

It's really top heavy due to having that 6+ gallon tank way up there and just plain too heavy for anything other than forest service roads for me. Others may be able to play harder on their A/T in more tougher trailes etc.

My '18 Wing is just pure pleasure for the pavement. I don't need to wake up the dead in the next zip code with loud pipes and all that but not me, I love QUIET! Who knows when it will be time for us to walk away from the Wing or two wheeling at that? Could be tomorrow, could be 10 years.
Scott
 

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It's good to see that I am not the only one going from a GoldWing to the AT (or having both for some). Out of the 24 motorcycles I've owned, I have had three GLs, an 83 GL1100, 94 GL1500, and a 2000 GL1500. I have put approx—150 K miles among the three. The GL is an excellent long-haul road bike that just eats up the miles be it highway or twisty back roads. I will say that I often took them down gravel roads. The switch to the AT has been a great switch. Now I can expand the type of roads that I can go down, considering the AT is pretty much a 1000cc dirt bike that is quite capable of moving right along on the highway as well as crawling down a rutted-out old road. There is no looking back, only forward to all the new areas I can explore with the AT.

For me, I own two bikes, the AT and a 2018 KTM 250 EXC-F tight woods riding weapon. At almost 60 yrs old I can only ride one bike at a time and these two pretty much cover it for me.

Ride More!

P
 
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