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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My arse tightening experience happened when I was doing 45 through a right hand 40 degree turn with a slight bank to it. I was just about in the middle of the lean and beginning to throttle out of the turn. Then I immediately notice the bike lean down to the inside more than normal then suddenly started to slide left ever so slightly. At first I thought it was a slick spot. I began to throttle up and bike seemed fine for about 100yrds then I felt her slide again in the front end. I slowed to a 20mph crawl and definitely felt the front wondering abit. I looked down at the tpms I installed and she was blinking red and reading 00. Thumbs up to the Continental TKC and thumbs down to TPMS.. I had no warning from it. It only revealed what I already knew. We stopped to asses then I limped home (about a mile or two) while strangling my grips and putting a permanent crease in my seat.
I later found the tube failed from what looked like a manufacture defect in a location where the sidewall would meet the tread.
Tube was a Kenda? Which was installed by a Honda stealership about 1000 miles previously.
Anyhow all is good now after installing new Dunlop tube. Which Btw new tube fixed a slight 30mph hop I was having. Not sure if there is a commonality here or just coincidence.
 

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My arse tightening experience happened when I was doing 45 through a right hand 40 degree turn with a slight bank to it. I was just about in the middle of the lean and beginning to throttle out of the turn. Then I immediately notice the bike lean down to the inside more than normal then suddenly started to slide left ever so slightly. At first I thought it was a slick spot. I began to throttle up and bike seemed fine for about 100yrds then I felt her slide again in the front end. I slowed to a 20mph crawl and definitely felt the front wondering abit. I looked down at the tpms I installed and she was blinking red and reading 00. Thumbs up to the Continental TKC and thumbs down to TPMS.. I had no warning from it. It only revealed what I already knew. We stopped to asses then I limped home (about a mile or two) while strangling my grips and putting a permanent crease in my seat.
I later found the tube failed from what looked like a manufacture defect in a location where the sidewall would meet the tread.
Tube was a Kenda? Which was installed by a Honda stealership about 1000 miles previously.
Anyhow all is good now after installing new Dunlop tube. Which Btw new tube fixed a slight 30mph hop I was having. Not sure if there is a commonality here or just coincidence.
First off nice to hear you and the bike are ok, and wow at the pic it looks more like the dam thing was stabbed. Personally I never had any issues with Kenda tires or tubes...
 

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thumbs down to TPMS.. I had no warning from it. It only revealed what I already knew.
I've added an aftermarket TPMS to the bike, then did the same for the car, both explicitly state that they are not designed to warn of rapid deflation. It really isn't what the TPMS is intended for.
 

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My arse tightening experience happened when I was doing 45 through a right hand 40 degree turn with a slight bank to it. I was just about in the middle of the lean and beginning to throttle out of the turn. Then I immediately notice the bike lean down to the inside more than normal then suddenly started to slide left ever so slightly. At first I thought it was a slick spot. I began to throttle up and bike seemed fine for about 100yrds then I felt her slide again in the front end. I slowed to a 20mph crawl and definitely felt the front wondering abit. I looked down at the tpms I installed and she was blinking red and reading 00. Thumbs up to the Continental TKC and thumbs down to TPMS.. I had no warning from it. It only revealed what I already knew. We stopped to asses then I limped home (about a mile or two) while strangling my grips and putting a permanent crease in my seat.
I later found the tube failed from what looked like a manufacture defect in a location where the sidewall would meet the tread.
Tube was a Kenda? Which was installed by a Honda stealership about 1000 miles previously.
Anyhow all is good now after installing new Dunlop tube. Which Btw new tube fixed a slight 30mph hop I was having. Not sure if there is a commonality here or just coincidence.
The TPS warning light has to be up high where you can see it(LED turns red on mine with sudden pressure drop) . Mine normally gives me plenty of warning (but I am tubeless so they always go down much slower than a tube)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks AT-Dragon. I am thankful for alot of things that went right. And It's a piece of experience I now have, but I would prefer to never use again. I am also happy with the sidewalls on the TKCs. They never "gave way" causing complete loss of control.
 

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This kind of kills all the arguments against putting tubeless tires on an Africa Twin front wheel because there is no “safety bead”.
 

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This kind of kills all the arguments against putting tubeless tires on an Africa Twin front wheel because there is no “safety bead”.
It always was a strange argument because a flat tube is never going to be able to apply any pressure on the tire to hold it on a bead anyway (so the outcome is the same for tube or tubeless with no safety bead). The advantage of going tubeless is that most times a tubeless puncture is a slow leak whereas a tube is almost always instant pressure loss.
 

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Once your slow leak (that you haven't noticed) gets low enough, that's where the safety bead comes in. Keeps you from having an instant leak after that, when the tire rolls off the bead. Just had that happen on my converted rear. I don't know how far I rode it completely flat, but it was still seated, because the rear does have the bead. Plugged it and went on.
 

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Once your slow leak (that you haven't noticed) gets low enough, that's where the safety bead comes in.
And that is why I have a TPMS. I have no safety bead in the front rim and no tube, I don't want a slow leak to turn into a big problem. So I have a tubeless tyre repair kit, a pump and a TPMS that flashes and beeps when the pressure drops below a defined value.
 

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I'm glad to hear that you rode it out.
I've had the same experience at highway speed. Instant deflation with a fully loaded bike. Sure gets you to pay attention in a hurry.
With slow deliberate motion and gradually steering I avoided a crash, too. Rode on the flat front tire for about 15 kilometres until the next town (no tube).
Don't think TPMS would have been of much use going from full inflation to zero in literally seconds.
 
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