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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all.

Having never done any meaningful off road travel but with a trip to Rawhyde scheduled for December, I'm wondering what you 50/50 riders do, if anything, to adjust your bars for off road riding.

I've been working to build experience standing on the pegs and it's clear that when doing so it would be better if the bars were higher so that my weight did not have to be so far forward. However, higher bars seem like they would be uncomfortable during my normal freeway/urban commute.

Would love to hear from folks with experience. Do you rotate the bars up, or install a riser when going off road? What other good ideas should I know about?

Thanks!
 

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I faced the same dilemma: setting the bars for ideal off-road riding left me with a headache if riding for more than an hour on the tarmac. I ended up leaving the bars on the ideal tarmac setting most of the time because although it was not quite ideal for off-road at least I didn't get a headache. However, if I'm doing a dedicated long distance off-road ride, I'll shift the bars up and use the low seat so I can flat-foot it when necessary. If anyone has a better solution I'd love to hear it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

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Easy cornering off-road.
I'm as tall as you.
I'm running KTM 250EXC-F and like its riding position (upright upper body, arms well bent, sitting closer to fuel tank).
So, I put Rox on AT to get similar riding position to 250 EXC-F.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm taller than you at 6'2'' so I rotated my ROX risers forward, not back, but this is how they look:

...
Cool, thanks for that. And you never feel any flex or anything and had no issue with cable routing/length?

I am thinking of doing a steering damper, which I guess would include some amount of rise anyway, though this is an interesting approach.
 

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Attached is a pic,which might be some help. Rotation angle looks not so much but it's enough for me. Details not sure, as my dealer installed Rox.
I feel a bit tight when getting key in/out, due to cables running over key hole very close. that's within patience though...
 

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I got the Rox risers from CRFs Only but they haven't arrived yet. I'm 6ft tall and find the bars to far forward and to low. When I put some risers on my Kaw KLR 650 they made the ride much more comfortable both on and offroad. I'm hoping for the same effect with the AT when I put the Roxs on.

I haven't seen any of Woodzman's AT videos posted on this forum yet. He does a great job of making install videos. Here's his video of the Rox risers. Woodzman is 6ft 2" tall.

 

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Hey all.

Having never done any meaningful off road travel but with a trip to Rawhyde scheduled for December, I'm wondering what you 50/50 riders do, if anything, to adjust your bars for off road riding.

I've been working to build experience standing on the pegs and it's clear that when doing so it would be better if the bars were higher so that my weight did not have to be so far forward. However, higher bars seem like they would be uncomfortable during my normal freeway/urban commute.

Would love to hear from folks with experience. Do you rotate the bars up, or install a riser when going off road? What other good ideas should I know about?

Thanks!
Recently took Chris Birch's ADV course on my Africa Twin and his Enduro course on my KTM350. He's 6'1" and yeah, he's a fit dude, but he does not recommend bar risers.

His optimal position for bars off road (Adventure and Enduro) is to rotate them forward until the 1st bend is parallel with the forks (for steering). Adjustment is easiest to do sanding with bars loosened so you can just bump them around. Levers - Birch likes them 10deg below horizontal to give good palm support .

I rolled my AT bars forward until bar bend is parallel to forks and set my levers ~20deg below horizontal - works well for me off road but took some getting used to when sitting back down. When you ride 600km in a day and 300km of it is on gravel you don't want to be stopping to adjust bars or levers. Take this as a starting point and find something that works for you.

His stand-up riding stance is:
- feet parallel (not duck foot or toed in) knees pinching the seat/tank area
- ass back slightly with knees over ankles like doing a squat (not standing tall or knees forward)
- head up, elbows out, hands very light on the bars (clamp your knees, find balance)
Effect is your centre of mass is lower than just standing tall and better braced. When he gets scared he drops his ass and crouches lower - further lowering his rider triangle.

You really don't want to be standing tall, unbraced, with your upper body acting like a pendulum getting knocked about with every bump and throttle input.

Enjoy the Rawhide course
Check out some Barry Morris cross-training skill videos. Somewhere in the lot are some about bike set up. http://crosstrainingenduro.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Recently took Chris Birch's ADV course on my Africa Twin...His optimal position for bars off road (Adventure and Enduro) is to rotate them forward until the 1st bend is parallel with the forks (for steering). Adjustment is easiest to do sanding with bars loosened so you can just bump them around. Levers - Birch likes them 10deg below horizontal to give good palm support .
Great info, thanks!
 

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Recently took Chris Birch's ADV course on my Africa Twin and his Enduro course on my KTM350. He's 6'1" and yeah, he's a fit dude, but he does not recommend bar risers.

His optimal position for bars off road (Adventure and Enduro) is to rotate them forward until the 1st bend is parallel with the forks (for steering). Adjustment is easiest to do sanding with bars loosened so you can just bump them around. Levers - Birch likes them 10deg below horizontal to give good palm support .

I rolled my AT bars forward until bar bend is parallel to forks and set my levers ~20deg below horizontal - works well for me off road but took some getting used to when sitting back down. When you ride 600km in a day and 300km of it is on gravel you don't want to be stopping to adjust bars or levers. Take this as a starting point and find something that works for you.

His stand-up riding stance is:
- feet parallel (not duck foot or toed in) knees pinching the seat/tank area
- ass back slightly with knees over ankles like doing a squat (not standing tall or knees forward)
- head up, elbows out, hands very light on the bars (clamp your knees, find balance)
Effect is your centre of mass is lower than just standing tall and better braced. When he gets scared he drops his ass and crouches lower - further lowering his rider triangle.

You really don't want to be standing tall, unbraced, with your upper body acting like a pendulum getting knocked about with every bump and throttle input.

Enjoy the Rawhide course
Check out some Barry Morris cross-training skill videos. Somewhere in the lot are some about bike set up. http://crosstrainingenduro.com
Good points for serious off-road, but I do not want to be squatting or hunched over for hours when I am riding gravel roads.

With the 2'' risers, all I had to do was remove the brake line from it's holder to give it a bit more play.
 
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