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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've done 8000 miles on my AT since last year, most of that in Europe on 2 long trips last summer. Luckily I've not had to deal with a puncture yet... But it's always on the back of my mind. I have comprehensive european breakdown cover so I know that any issue would be dealt with if I couldn't deal with it myself, but the amount of time lost to a puncture with tubed tyres wouldn't be great. I carry my levers, 2 spare front and 2 spare rear tubes (I know, excessive) puncture repair kit, valve stem remover, and everything I need to repair a puncture by the road. In my garage I've changed my tyres myself using only the kit I carry on my bike, and it went fine.

But the last time I tried to change my tyres myself, a month or so ago, I couldn't break the bead and gave up and took it into the shop. I'm definitely not that confident with dealing with a puncture myself, by the side of a road somewhere in Europe! The fact I couldn't break that bead that time really dented my confidence.

Has anyone had any experience with dealing with a puncture yet with the tubed tyres?

Cheers!
 

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Hi yes I have fixed a flat tyre. On only the third day of owning my bike, still had stock tyres on it and had not been off road yet. I had all the tools and found it quite fine to do. Only trouble I had it was the front tyre and on the centre stand the bike wants to fall forward once you remove the tyre. Easy fix found a stick and proper it up on the bottom of the triple clamps. I would post a photo but only on iPad and wont let me.

Cheers
 

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I've done 8000 miles on my AT since last year, most of that in Europe on 2 long trips last summer. Luckily I've not had to deal with a puncture yet... But it's always on the back of my mind. I have comprehensive european breakdown cover so I know that any issue would be dealt with if I couldn't deal with it myself, but the amount of time lost to a puncture with tubed tyres wouldn't be great. I carry my levers, 2 spare front and 2 spare rear tubes (I know, excessive) puncture repair kit, valve stem remover, and everything I need to repair a puncture by the road. In my garage I've changed my tyres myself using only the kit I carry on my bike, and it went fine.

But the last time I tried to change my tyres myself, a month or so ago, I couldn't break the bead and gave up and took it into the shop. I'm definitely not that confident with dealing with a puncture myself, by the side of a road somewhere in Europe! The fact I couldn't break that bead that time really dented my confidence.

Has anyone had any experience with dealing with a puncture yet with the tubed tyres?

Cheers!

If you are most worried about breaking the bead just get the best rest bead breaker tools. These are very nice kits.

https://bestrestproducts.com/product-category/beadbrakr-tcm/
 

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If one has little or no experience repairing tube punctures, I suggest practicing at home with the tools you will have in the field. AT wheels and tires are nothing special.
 

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I haven't done it out in the field, but I have done it in the garage using only the tools I carry and it's pretty straightforward even with heavier duty off-road tyres like the Tractionators. The front is a piece of cake...it only takes a few minutes; the rear a little longer because of the thicker tyre walls. I use a motion-pro bead-breaker/tyre spoon set and it breaks the bead real easy, plus it is lightweight and dual purpose. You'll want the centre-stand to be fitted though.
 

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I have put 'BIKE-SEAL' in my tubes as a preventative measure after watching impressive videos on 'you tube'. Will seal up to 15mm hole but if the worst happened it would be the breakdown service for me.
 

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I would post a photo but only on iPad and wont let me.
I don't mean to thread jack, but in case Karlos is not alone you can post pics from mobile device by clicking "go advanced" at the bottom next to "quick reply" and then scroll down to "manage attachments" under attach files. This opens an upload window. The same "manage attachments" option appears when replying to a quote.

Back to the show

Odd that mountain bikes are going with tubeless for reliability and weight savings, yet we are going the other way to save money, really on a motorcycle? I would spend the cash for a tubeless setup, if I could have traded my stock stuff at full price. But I guess that's why the AT is such a bargain, like the 12 volt accessory :wink2:
 

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I second the Motion Pro BeadPro levers. I have the longer forged steel set. With that, and sometimes a swift kick with my heel, I can unseat the rear bead.
 

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I also carry a Motion Pro Bead Buddy. This little gadget is a godsend when using the shorter spoons I carry in my kit.
Fuelpincher,
Have you used the Bead Buddy on the AT tires? I was wondering about this gadget on AT sized tires/rims. I have been so close to buying one a couple of times.
 

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Fuelpincher,
Have you used the Bead Buddy on the AT tires? I was wondering about this gadget on AT sized tires/rims. I have been so close to buying one a couple of times.
Yes. It works as designed for the front wheel but it is too short to fit over a spoke on the wide rear. I used a tie wrap to attach it to a rear spoke. Not as convenient and it does not push the bead down on the rear as far as I would like but still better than not using it. Maybe they will come out with a larger one for the now popular wide rims. Bead Buddy also makes a different design model that attaches with a thumb screw clamp. I never tried one of them but it may be the ticket for the rear. Anybody who has one of these, let us know.
 

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Bummer, that's what I was worried about on the rear wheel. The front tire is much easier, it's when I'm dealing with the rear tire I invent new swear words. I hope MotionPro is listening, I like their stuff so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all the advice guys, I just need to practice it more I think and get comfortable.

What's the best bead breaker? How's the motion pro bead pro?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks everyone,

Motion pro bead breaker on order should arrive Tuesday/Wednesday and I can start practising some more and getting comfortable.

Now my main anxiety is blowouts due to the tube tearing. How dramatic has this been for you guys? Sorry tubes are very new to me.
 

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Thanks everyone,

Motion pro bead breaker on order should arrive Tuesday/Wednesday and I can start practising some more and getting comfortable.

Now my main anxiety is blowouts due to the tube tearing. How dramatic has this been for you guys? Sorry tubes are very new to me.
If you mean catastrophic tire failure (exploding tire), like seen on cars and trucks, I believe is rare on motorcycles, tubed or tubeless. Motorcycle tires are rated for speeds and heat and load above the typical riding conditions. A tubed tire may lose it's air rapidly from a torn or pinched tube but the tire will remain intact. Usually this will happen off-road from striking a sharp rock or other obstacle and the motorcycle will be traveling at less than highway speeds. From my experience, highway punctures are caused by nails and will lose air slowly. It still remains tough for some riders to keep control whilst coming to a stop but can be done safely if one doesn't panic, slam on the brakes and over control the bike.
 

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Many times, just not on the AT yet. Typically I just lay the bike on its side, spoon off one side of the tire, pull the tube out where punctured and patch. If I need to change the tube I'll pull the axle just enough to slip the tube through.

I've done 8000 miles on my AT since last year, most of that in Europe on 2 long trips last summer. Luckily I've not had to deal with a puncture yet... But it's always on the back of my mind. I have comprehensive european breakdown cover so I know that any issue would be dealt with if I couldn't deal with it myself, but the amount of time lost to a puncture with tubed tyres wouldn't be great. I carry my levers, 2 spare front and 2 spare rear tubes (I know, excessive) puncture repair kit, valve stem remover, and everything I need to repair a puncture by the road. In my garage I've changed my tyres myself using only the kit I carry on my bike, and it went fine.

But the last time I tried to change my tyres myself, a month or so ago, I couldn't break the bead and gave up and took it into the shop. I'm definitely not that confident with dealing with a puncture myself, by the side of a road somewhere in Europe! The fact I couldn't break that bead that time really dented my confidence.

Has anyone had any experience with dealing with a puncture yet with the tubed tyres?

Cheers!
 

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Many times, just not on the AT all yet. Typically I just lay the bike on its side, spoon off one side of the tire, pull the tube out where punctured and patch. If I need to change the tube I'll pull the axle just enough to slip the tube through.
Graves,
What kind of patch kit are you using? Do you have a link?
 

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Just the cheapees from Wal Mart. Just remember, once you open that tube of glue, it's finished, buy another kit. I dont know what happens to the glue, but the next time you go to use it the tube is empty.

Graves,
What kind of patch kit are you using? Do you have a link?
 
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