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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up a new 2022 AT basic Friday. I wanted the lightest bike with a manual transmission. At 5'9" and 154 lbs I was already on the edge. My last bike was a Harley Davidson FLHT which tipped the scales at about 880 lbs so the 505 for the AT seems nimble. Loaded it on a trailer at the dealer and have only ridden it about 100 yards to the garage. I can't ride it on the road yet as my helmet hasn't arrived yet. I've owned four Honda's and three HD's over the course of 52 years.
 

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Welcome to the light side @TM44!

Tease the Forum with outgoing and incoming photos of the bikes.

100 yards? Bah, probably shoulda put down 3600" - the number looks much bigger. :)

Hopefully your experience is fantastic. Can't wait to read your riding review.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
LOL Yeah that does sound a little better. It's looking like Wednesday before the helmet arrives so I'm just trying to familiarize myself with the setup screens. I've ordered a center stand and wind deflectors. The outback crash bars seem to be out of stock. From reading here they seem to be well regarded.
Tire Wheel Vehicle Window Automotive tire
 

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2018 Adventure Sports DCT
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Hi and welcome
 

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Great looking bike. Let the farkling begin!! I just received and installed my outback bars and am impressed with the quality. They did take over two months to get here though.BTW, there is no written instructions for installation and the videos from the website truly suck. The video for the lower crash bars especially. Mounting points are very tight but no way around that.
Be safe
 

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I picked up a new 2022 AT basic Friday. I wanted the lightest bike with a manual transmission. At 5'9" and 154 lbs I was already on the edge. My last bike was a Harley Davidson FLHT which tipped the scales at about 880 lbs so the 505 for the AT seems nimble. Loaded it on a trailer at the dealer and have only ridden it about 100 yards to the garage. I can't ride it on the road yet as my helmet hasn't arrived yet. I've owned four Honda's and three HD's over the course of 52 years.

If it ever gets to feeling too heavy have a look at the newer CB500x's with the 19" front. They redid the suspension (more travel) and added dual calipers.

My father was looking to get an AT (He's 70) and decided it was too heavy and things are only getting heavier for him so he went with the CB. That bike is fantastic for anyone looking for something lighter and easier to manage. It shouldn't have any issues going down any typical gravel road that the AT was made for with ease.

I think it's 439lbs wet and has similar range to the ATAS. The 500's mellow but the tradeoff is excellent mpg on 87 octane. We already hit 74.4mpg average on one tank with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you for your comments. I considered the 500x but living in the southeast and wanting to explore the western US I wanted a more capable road bike. Something that would run all day at interstate speeds. It's a long way out there. I originally was looking at a Yamaha Tenere 700 but after waiting a few months for one I concluded it was the mythical unicorn. Plus I really wanted cruise control for the long road. My last bike was a HD with cc and became addicted to it.
 

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Thank you for your comments. I considered the 500x but living in the southeast and wanting to explore the western US I wanted a more capable road bike. Something that would run all day at interstate speeds. It's a long way out there. I originally was looking at a Yamaha Tenere 700 but after waiting a few months for one I concluded it was the mythical unicorn. Plus I really wanted cruise control for the long road. My last bike was a HD with cc and became addicted to it.
I think the 500x would have no problems out west. I lived out in Utah for 3 years. They do move fast on the highway at 80-90mph but the 500x will do that no problem, it just accelerates like a typical 4 cyl car at those speeds compared to a 1100cc bike like the AT which is more snappy.

The AT has cruise control though which is really nice. And CarPlay is great for the number of mapping options we have access too.

That CB actually isn’t stressed at all at 80mph if anyones looking at one. But it won’t accelerate like a typical liter bike at those speeds, but it’s not being murdered at redline like a CRF300L would be at 75-80mph. The RPM was in the same range as my previous Versys 650 at higher highway speeds. It just gets way better fuel economy. It’s actually a much smoother engine in the CB at typical cruising speeds. It’s a very smooth bike.

If you head out west try to use the old US highway system routes instead of the interstate. You can still cruise along at 65-75mph and there’s far less 18 wheelers and traffic. Plus it’s just better views the whole way. I’ve been across the USA about a dozen times now and up to Alaska and over to Newfoundland. I just need to head far south now.

One thing I’ve noticed with my 1100 AT is it puts off a lot of heat on the legs. (I’m in Alabama). It was upper 80’s the other day and it was pretty noticeable. Definately one of the hottest bikes I’ve ridden in that respect. I’m hoping it’s not really bad on 90+ days at low speeds. It’s probably a byproduct of them having to run bikes leaner and leaner for emissions and the header pipes are extremely hot with the high EGT temps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think the 500x would have no problems out west. I lived out in Utah for 3 years. They do move fast on the highway at 80-90mph but the 500x will do that no problem, it just accelerates like a typical 4 cyl car at those speeds compared to a 1100cc bike like the AT which is more snappy.

The AT has cruise control though which is really nice. And CarPlay is great for the number of mapping options we have access too.

That CB actually isn’t stressed at all at 80mph if anyones looking at one. But it won’t accelerate like a typical liter bike at those speeds, but it’s not being murdered at redline like a CRF300L would be at 75-80mph. The RPM was in the same range as my previous Versys 650 at higher highway speeds. It just gets way better fuel economy. It’s actually a much smoother engine in the CB at typical cruising speeds. It’s a very smooth bike.

If you head out west try to use the old US highway system routes instead of the interstate. You can still cruise along at 65-75mph and there’s far less 18 wheelers and traffic. Plus it’s just better views the whole way. I’ve been across the USA about a dozen times now and up to Alaska and over to Newfoundland. I just need to head far south now.

One thing I’ve noticed with my 1100 AT is it puts off a lot of heat on the legs. (I’m in Alabama). It was upper 80’s the other day and it was pretty noticeable. Definately one of the hottest bikes I’ve ridden in that respect. I’m hoping it’s not really bad on 90+ days at low speeds. It’s probably a byproduct of them having to run bikes leaner and leaner for emissions and the header pipes are extremely hot with the high EGT temps.
I'm not a stranger to engine heat. The HD put out plenty. Nice in the winter not so in the summer. Yeah to get the emissions down they're all lean burning them.
 

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2020 Africa Twin DCT
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I bought the full Heed bars for mine, they were shipped from Poland in 5 days and I had installed within a week of ordering them. They also have a rear bar (~$130) that adds excellent hand hold/strap mounting location.
 

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Any pictures of that setup?
Heed full DCT crash bars on a 2020 standard with Heed rear crash bars also added. Also you’ll see a Givi 1179fz rear carrier that plays well with the Heed rear bar.
 

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Thank you for the pictures. Is that the oem center stand?
Yes, I installed the OEM center stand this past weekend, it wasn’t nearly as difficult as others let on. In fact, all you need is a longish (1 foot or so) heavy-duty flat-blade screwdriver with a smooth shaft to install the two springs one at a time.
I’d suggest starting on the right side of the bike, hook the spring on the screwdriver about 1/3 way up from the tip, and put the tip of the screwdriver 1/4” or so into the spring capture notch on the stand. DON’T TIE OR HOLD THE STAND CLOSED, it needs to be down a bit to lever the screwdriver and also so you can see what you’re doing. Leverage the screwdriver in the notch to pull the spring taut. As you pull the screwdriver further to stretch the spring beyond the notch point it will eventually slide down the shaft and off the end of the screwdriver, the notch will catch the spring hook and that’s it. Once one spring is installed you’ll have to push down to hold the stand slightly open again with one hand while levering the screwdriver from the other (left) side. If the spring doesn’t catch in the notch, try again a couple of times until it does, only takes a few minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the install tips.I have an oem stand on order which should arrive early next week. Somewhere I have an old drum brake spring tool which I thought I'd try. It's essentially similar to the screwdriver except it has a dimple in the end to engage the stud the spring installs on. Not sure if it will work any better than a screwdriver but I have both.
 
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