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Keeping’em Moderatorated
2018 Adventure Sports DCT
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I only recall reading one issue, but with DCT surging , I believe it was a ECU issue in his case. But that aside, the shop was supposed to flush out your tank, granted per Honda it’s basically adding fuel to the tank swirling it around for X amount of time then doing that again, Honda paid them time to do that along with replacing the filter. Contact Honda and report what happened, did this happen on your first ride after they worked on it ?


BTW.. Hi and welcome to the forum..
 

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What you describe regarding a cone drill, sounds like lateral oscillations, similar to an instant tire failure. Did one of your tires blow? It may be just the angle, but is the rear tire bead broken from the rim in the photo?
 

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Keeping’em Moderatorated
2018 Adventure Sports DCT
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What you describe regarding a cone drill, sounds like lateral oscillations, similar to an instant tire failure. Did one of your tires blow? It may be just the angle, but is the rear tire bead broken from the rim in the photo?
I thought about that too, but I would expect to see that rear tire looking like it’s about to fall off the rim and too chances are pretty low on a tube tire to have sudden rapid decompression, usually you feel it getting loose in the rear…
 

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Jeez @treydizzle45 - dismal to read this unfortunate experience.

It appears you have a non-DCT model, so I would hazard to suspect a poor electrical input into the ECU (loose wire, bad ground?) as AT-Dragon suggests.

For what its worth, welcome to the Forum. Hopefully you will stick around and continue to share your story as it unfolds. Maybe introduce yourself at the New Member Introductions area of the Forum.
 

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Keeping’em Moderatorated
2018 Adventure Sports DCT
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So I took my 2019 Africa twin adventure sport to the shop and all they did was change the fuel filter they didn't flush out the tank or the fuel system and I ended up wrecking a hundred yards from my house. Shop is only 10 minutes away. I was following behind a car when all of a sudden the bike went crazy and slammed me down. Going 3rd gear around 48-50mph. Now I'm not blaming the shop just wondering what y'all think? I've got 50 sutures in my right arm. The bike was off when I went to get the key. The best way I can describe is the bike slung back and forth like it was going through a cone drill before slamming me.. Traction control on and ABS. Can anyone guess what happened?
What you describe regarding a cone drill, sounds like lateral oscillations, similar to an instant tire failure. Did one of your tires blow? It may be just the angle, but is the rear tire bead broken from the rim in the photo?
@treydizzle45
It would be good to know about the current air pressure in your rear tire. Since you have tube tires they most likely will have air in them after an accident, unless the tires were uber low on pressure and hit something hard enough to pinch the tire and the tube to flatten it, even then that is most likely to happen to the front wheel. But looking at the pics, the condition of the bike and where it’s at I would expect to find air in both tires. Tubeless would be a 50/50 chance on a tubeless if the side of the tire is rolled enough or enough lateral force is applied, both of which can easily happen in a accident, then you would have a flat/flats ..

chopperbob is right, it is very had to see if that tire is still locked on the bead or not. To me it doesn’t look like it is. But if it is then that is your culprit, especially if you did some hard acceleration before it happened, you could of spun the rim on the the tire and popped the beads…
 

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Tank slapper...

Trying to correct it by grabbing the bars more firmly only reinforces the oscillations and they become quicker/more violent. The only solution to ending it while it's happening is an abrupt change of speed, be it accelerating, decelerating or, in some cases, crashing.
ALL bikes have speed "zones" in which these steering oscillations will occur. Most times it comes on quite quickly, some times it starts as a gentle weaving. Once started, the speed of the oscillations only increases in frequency until they peak for the conditions that set them in motion.

This guy's tank slapper is famous. For the longest time, rumor was that it killed him. Not true. He starts giving his perspective of "slappers" around the 3:30 mark...
 

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Keeping’em Moderatorated
2018 Adventure Sports DCT
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Yes they do in excessive speed especially deceleration, but at 48-50 MPH it is neither. At that speed the AT is stable. I’ve stood up taken both hands off the bars and stretched out, on long rides. It’s a sympathetic wobble to the gyroscopic effect of the wheels. Anyone who’s played with a gyroscope has done it. Get rocking back and forth at the right frequency and it will quickly escalate out of control. But , point being it needs an outside force to do it. That being said the other effect is the slower the wheel is turning the less effect it has and the less inertia..

BTW if it happens it’s always the opposite of what caused it, if acceleration then deceleration the opposite for deceleration or enough of a move towards the opposite I should say..
At 160+ MPH most any mistake is unforgiving..
 

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No.
The cure is to get through the condition that is causing the problem. If you're either accelerating or decelerating, you can can get through it if you apply more of what you're doing, assuming you're not already at the limits of your gassing or braking.
I've done it on sport bikes at street speeds - decel and accel - as slow as 35mph, sportbikes at track speeds - decel and accel. GoldWings at steady, elevated highway speeds by taking a hand off the bars - started as a slow weave, increasingly progressive, would've ended badly but stopped immediately when I put the other "phase" of the two-handed steering damper back in place.
EVERY bike I've ever ridden has a couple/few zones where this phenomenon can present itself so I assume it's not bike specific. That you inferred differing sizes of wheels being a factor does change the conditions in which this may occur, and I've done it on an XR650L, as well...not one I'd like to repeat. The huge wallowing due to long suspension strokes exacerbates the situation.
Downhill turns, uphill turns, one-handed riding at that certain steady speed, flat leisurely accelerating/decelerating, it doesn't really matter. What matters is the steering/suspension geometry, including tire profiles and the bike's attitude, in which those dynamic components become effected. There are likely a near infinite number of combinations that can induce a tankslapper, just as there are a near infinite number of combinations that can eliminate them. Once in a while, you're likely to find yourself in that threshold and get caught out. Many, many more times you'll cross the threshold and not even know it cuz you've continued on through it before it could take hold. You won't know what conditions will set it off until you experience them presenting themselves...and then you learn to eliminate factors of those conditions through varying your riding technique(s) or altering your bike's settings. Altering settings can be good or bad. Depending on which direction you go, you could eliminate the occurrence in that one situation only to promote it in another.

As to your bicycle wheel example, the outside forces would be a motorcycle's rear wheel, the bike's attitude, the steering angle, the suspension geometry and settings, the tire, the wheels' balance, the pitch/camber and surface of the road, the rider's style/technique and the rate of progress. Pick one, or more, to either induce or eliminate the occurrence.
 

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With the tires and terrain in pic guessing you hit the gas and bike went sideways planting you before you realized. Not being mean at all but those tires+ that wet grass and mud+ throttle equals disaster. Its rider error
 

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No.
The cure is to get through the condition that is causing the problem. If you're either accelerating or decelerating, you can can get through it if you apply more of what you're doing, assuming you're not already at the limits of your gassing or braking.
I've done it on sport bikes at street speeds - decel and accel - as slow as 35mph, sportbikes at track speeds - decel and accel. GoldWings at steady, elevated highway speeds by taking a hand off the bars - started as a slow weave, increasingly progressive, would've ended badly but stopped immediately when I put the other "phase" of the two-handed steering damper back in place.
EVERY bike I've ever ridden has a couple/few zones where this phenomenon can present itself so I assume it's not bike specific. That you inferred differing sizes of wheels being a factor does change the conditions in which this may occur, and I've done it on an XR650L, as well...not one I'd like to repeat. The huge wallowing due to long suspension strokes exacerbates the situation.
Downhill turns, uphill turns, one-handed riding at that certain steady speed, flat leisurely accelerating/decelerating, it doesn't really matter. What matters is the steering/suspension geometry, including tire profiles and the bike's attitude, in which those dynamic components become effected. There are likely a near infinite number of combinations that can induce a tankslapper, just as there are a near infinite number of combinations that can eliminate them. Once in a while, you're likely to find yourself in that threshold and get caught out. Many, many more times you'll cross the threshold and not even know it cuz you've continued on through it before it could take hold. You won't know what conditions will set it off until you experience them presenting themselves...and then you learn to eliminate factors of those conditions through varying your riding technique(s) or altering your bike's settings. Altering settings can be good or bad. Depending on which direction you go, you could eliminate the occurrence in that one situation only to promote it in another.

As to your bicycle wheel example, the outside forces would be a motorcycle's rear wheel, the bike's attitude, the steering angle, the suspension geometry and settings, the tire, the wheels' balance, the pitch/camber and surface of the road, the rider's style/technique and the rate of progress. Pick one, or more, to either induce or eliminate the occurrence.
You dont have a fork brace.... it's a game changer on and off road on brp
 

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Fork brace? Last time I saw one of those was back in the '70s...when they needed 'em. Wait. I take that back. My little YSR roadracer ('88) has an aftermarket fork brace...which is understandable given the fork tubes are only about an inch in dia.
I imagine any other bike today that's fitted with one prolly coulda avoided it if they simply used larger diameter fork tubes.

brp?
 

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My dad out a superbrace fork brace on 95 GW that he gave me. Couldn't imagine Hossing it without. I put a fork brace on my tricked 2014 xrl650 and huge difference. No speed wobbles and more point shoot off-road.
 

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I can see that. I think the GW I rode was from that era. My XR650L prolly coulda used one but I never liked it enough to keep it, much less trick it out.
 
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