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As a matter of fact I just ran out last Friday about 300 ft from the gas station. At least it wasn't too far to push. The gauge said I still had 16 miles. I knew it was coming though because the throttle was chopping on my '20 CRF1100 AS ES DCT. I should note as someone above said I did not lay the bike down to jostle the fuel from the left side to the right where the pump is since it was rush hour traffic in SoCal on a Friday night. Admittedly I am what my buddy calls me a "bottom tanker" and I tend to push the limit. Now I know....pushing my luck below 20 miles.
 

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I have run my 2018 ATAS out of gas. The light was on but it was indicating a 40 mile range. We were on the expressway and knew there was gas at the next two exits. Wanted to stop at the 2nd as it had something we wanted and thought we had plenty of range to cover the 8 miles. Shortly after passing the first exit it suddenly went from 40 miles to 20 and a mile later 12, etc. Before we new it it read zero and the bike was coughing. Got it about another mile or so before it was dead. Lesson learned. After that I never let it drop below 50 if I can help it. Crazy that there is no buffer with this bike. The fuel gage on my Vstrom was very accurate.
 

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As a matter of fact I just ran out last Friday about 300 ft from the gas station. At least it wasn't too far to push. The gauge said I still had 16 miles. I knew it was coming though because the throttle was chopping on my '20 CRF1100 AS ES DCT. I should note as someone above said I did not lay the bike down to jostle the fuel from the left side to the right where the pump is since it was rush hour traffic in SoCal on a Friday night. Admittedly I am what my buddy calls me a "bottom tanker" and I tend to push the limit. Now I know....pushing my luck below 20 miles.
I doubt that laying the bike over will accomplish anything. It appears the lowest part of the tank is where the the fuel pump is and both sides of the tank are common there.
 

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I doubt that laying the bike over will accomplish anything. It appears the lowest part of the tank is where the the fuel pump is and both sides of the tank are common there.
It does, the tank has a hump in it. Ours is not very big but it’s still there. But getting the gas over also means you can’t lean the bike back to that side or the gas will of course go back too.
 

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The last bar started flashing red with 47 miles left. Way closer than I like to cut it. I rarely get much below half tank. With the fluctuations in temperature and high humidity here, I try to keep her relatively full to avoid condensation in my tank.
 

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I suppose the old saying of "pushing the envelope" to see how far you can travel on a tank of fuel is better than pushing the bike....... that would be my luck!
 

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I suppose the old saying of "pushing the envelope" to see how far you can travel on a tank of fuel is better than pushing the bike....... that would be my luck!
Two weeks ago I hit an average of 27.5km/L on a 380km ride, which means I could have gotten about 500km on one tank of fuel. But... that was highway, barely traffic, and just cruising at 98km/h GPS. Was there any fun: Not much more than riding the bike instead of a car.

But while commuting 180-190km before/after a day at work, I prefer just an easy and steady ride to work/back home over "fun".
 

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Two weeks ago I hit an average of 27.5km/L on a 380km ride, which means I could have gotten about 500km on one tank of fuel. But... that was highway, barely traffic, and just cruising at 98km/h GPS. Was there any fun: Not much more than riding the bike instead of a car.

But while commuting 180-190km before/after a day at work, I prefer just an easy and steady ride to work/back home over "fun".
At my best mpg which was mellow riding at about 40-50mph/60-80km/h I would have 371 miles 594KM to empty. I've ridden it over 300 miles on a tank a bunch of times now.

It gets superb economy at lower speeds for the engine size and about what you'd expect at highway speed from an 1100.
 

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2022 CRF1100 ATAS ES DCT
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Yes, 55-60mph seems to be a sweet spot for the engine, did about 30 miles at that speed one time and the average was showing as 67mpg but it soon dropped to my normal 52mpg when I got onto the roads I like, narrow winding, hilly roads.
 

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Yes, 55-60mph seems to be a sweet spot for the engine, did about 30 miles at that speed one time and the average was showing as 67mpg but it soon dropped to my normal 52mpg when I got onto the roads I like, narrow winding, hilly roads.
Agreed. Like most dino-burnin' vehicles on average: 90 km/h on horizontal surfaces is sweetest.

The Africa Twin is a pig at elevated freeway speeds - not surprising really.
 

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Agreed. Like most dino-burnin' vehicles on average: 90 km/h on horizontal surfaces is sweetest.

The Africa Twin is a pig at elevated freeway speeds - not surprising really.
I think it’s pretty average for a 1100, low 40’s maybe upper 30’s.

Now a Pig was my RX3, a 250cc into a 50mph headwind at redline for hours WOT. 29mpg. My all time lowest mpg ever on any motorcycle. Second place goes to the MG Stelvio at 33mpg at 80mph.

Who said 250’s get good mpg!
 

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I think it’s pretty average for a 1100, low 40’s maybe upper 30’s.

Now a Pig was my RX3, a 250cc into a 50mph headwind at redline for hours WOT. 29mpg. My all time lowest mpg ever on any motorcycle. Second place goes to the MG Stelvio at 33mpg at 80mph.

Who said 250’s get good mpg!
... I suppose the keyword here was "redline". That is pretty special. :)
 
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